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Thread: Rice in European food

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    Post Rice in European food



    Rice has played an important role in European culinary habits for a long time. Risotto has been part of North-Western Italian cuisine since the 14th century, while rice was used in Spain to make dishes such as paella since its introduction by the Arabs in the 8th century. South-Eastern Europeans (Bosnians, Romanians, Greeks, Turks...) eat rice in a variety of dishes, such as pilaf.

    Rice thus predates potatoes, which only arrived in 1537 in Europe, but not widespread before the 17th century. Nowadays, naturally, Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese and Indian food have all become so popular that rice is eaten more than potatoes, especially among younger generations of Europeans, and especially in Britain and Latin countries.

    But rice has been used in traditional dishes in many European countries, and not just Mediterranean ones. One of the most popular desserts in France is named riz au lait (rice pudding), i.e. rice cooked in sweeten milk, and often eaten with brown sugar. All big dairy product makers, like Danone, Yoplait or Nestle, have their riz au lait, which fill the shelves of any supermarket in France, Switzerland or Belgium. Families often make their own at home, as it is one of the easiest dessert to prepare (just cook rice 45min in milk, maybe some vanilla sweetener and/or an egg, then serve in a bowl and add some brown sugar).

    In Belgium, one of the local specialities is the tarte au riz (rice tart), which originally comes from the town of Verviers, between Liege, Maastricht (in the Netherlands) and Aachen (in Germany). You can find it in virtually any Belgian bakery.

    There are many other traditional dishes in France and Belgium served with rice (e.g. with a Provencal sauce), and rice is indeed eaten a lot, as the quantities of rice boxes and bags in these countries' supermarkets confirm.

    With the emergence of fusion cuisines, with strong Asian influences, rice has a assured future in Europe.

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    Rice pudding is popular here too - Muller is the main shop-bought one. There is a dish called kedgeree, which is rice and fish - it's named after an Indian dish, but is quite different.

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    Umm paella and risotto, those are some of my favorite dishes.

    I heard that in Northen Italy, rice is more consumed than pasta. They even have pasta shaped almost like rice called "orzo" which is often used in soups and salads.

    The variety of rice dishes from Europe seems more popular than their food with plain rice in Japan among young generation.

    Are there any well-known German dishes with rice?

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    There is a german souffle with rice raisins, apple, egg, rhum and honey but I don't remenber the name...

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    Quote Originally Posted by misa.j
    Are there any well-known German dishes with rice?
    Not necessarily German, but rather Austrian (originally Hungarian and Serbian):

    Reisfleisch (rice meat)



    There's also Reisauflauf (rice casserole, usually sweet).


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    Thanks Lacan and thomas!

    I did a quick search and found out that rice pudding was pretty common in Scandinavian region as well.

    Hashed beef(Hayashi rice) they have in Japan is originated in Europe, but it's been Japanized to suit their taste. It is nothing like the hash browns with corned beef & potatos you get in the US.

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    Quote Originally Posted by misa.j
    Are there any well-known German dishes with rice?
    I found one on the ..uuh ... internet

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    Oh yeah, a sausage on top of fake rice baby!

    A good German beer helps chow down everthing!

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    I know in my family that we always cook rice with something to give it flavor. Usually its a meaty product to let the juice sink in the rice and give it taste... one of those square flavor paked concentrated things also works... in french i think it's called bouillon. I don't know in other nations but in Albanian and Turkey we at times mix rice with beans. Rice itself in a cooked manner is no longer called just simple rice but Pilaf, and the beans cooked in the soup manner are called fasule. So usually one puts rice on the plate and then pours the beans and their souplike, but thicker, juice into the rice and you can either mix it or make a kind of volcano arrangament with the beans and juice simmering in themiddle of the rice formation It's actually quite tasty and full of nutrient goods. It's also refered to as the poor man's meal because rice and beans are among the cheapest food commodities to buy.

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    The traditional Finnish foods that include rice are casseroles (e.g. carrot casserole), sausages, carelian pies and rice porridge. I guess there are other foods, too, but I think rice has been more of a supplement in foods in order to make up for meat... I don't know if it's always been so, but the traditional rice-including foods are nowadays eaten on Christmas, so maybe this is because rice was more expensive than other ingredients so it was used once a year to make foods that will fill you up really well.

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    The Dutch eat more rice since we, from the former Dutch East Indies, came to settle down in the Netherlands. Also the many Chinese restaurants brought rice to the Dutch. And today many Turks an Moroccans eat rice by their meals. So in the Supermarkets you will now find all type of rice.
    I love the Pandan and the Basmati rice. But I love the Italian risotto as well.
    But sorry I cann't eat sweet rice. That's a matter of taste.

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    Quote Originally Posted by miu
    The traditional Finnish foods that include rice are casseroles (e.g. carrot casserole), sausages, carelian pies and rice porridge. I guess there are other foods, too, but I think rice has been more of a supplement in foods in order to make up for meat... I don't know if it's always been so, but the traditional rice-including foods are nowadays eaten on Christmas, so maybe this is because rice was more expensive than other ingredients so it was used once a year to make foods that will fill you up really well.
    Interesting, as Finland is such a cold country I didn't expect people over there would eat rice traditionally. I am interested to go to Finland for Xmas. I heard Santa clause lives there.

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    I am an Australian and I am currently living in Strasbourg, France. In this province people eat potatoes traditionally rather than the French bread baguette. I have been invited quite a few times by French families for dinners at their homes; but I have never been served rice before during those invites.
    Yes there are a lot of varieties of rice sold in supermarkets but in Australia there are more varieties. For example I never able to find brown rice sold here.
    Last edited by Minty; 26-02-06 at 18:59.

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    Hi Minty,

    I think that speaking about brown rice is what we call unpolished rice in the Netherlands? Yes you can buy this rice in Holland, it is rich of vitamine B.
    But I never see it in restaurants, the white rice looks better on the table.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth van Kampen
    Hi Minty,
    I think that speaking about brown rice is what we call unpolished rice in the Netherlands? Yes you can buy this rice in Holland, it is rich of vitamine B.
    But I never see it in restaurants, the white rice looks better on the table.

    Hi there, Elizabeth!

    Thanks for the information about brown rice. Unfortunately I would not go all the way to the Netherlands just to purchase brown rice. Honestly I never saw any sold here.

    Japanese rice is easy to find, for Chinese food I prefer Jasmine rice by sun rice which is an Australian brand, but I am told here by a supplier that Jasmine rice do not exists, yet I have been eating it in Australia for years. Since I canft find Jasmine rice, I try a few varieties of other rice like basmati which is Indian rice and rice from Vietnam and Thailand. In the end I decided the Thai rice tastes the best out of the three for me, Vietnamese rice is too hard and Indian rice is too dry.

    Yes white rice look better on table I don't really have a problem with eating white rice, sushi one of my favourite food needs to made with white rice otherwise it won't stick.


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    Well we also do not eat much rice ...more pasta and pizza as all know
    in the noth of Italy there are differt plates with rice...
    we eat a first dish than meat or fish and saled....with bread
    not like in oriente that they eat with meat or fish as we eat salad.
    Unfortanly we eat too much....each italian region (19) has her gatronomy and particular local dishes...there is a big difference
    of what you eat in Venice and Palermo in Sicily.
    bye

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    In Portugal, when I go to the local supermarket, I have 4-5 varieties of rice available. And as for traditional recipes there are several popular dishes like "arroz de marisco" (seafood cooked with rice) or "arroz doce" (sweet rice, roughly translated but it is simlar to a rice pudding).

    er... never seen it with so many shrimp, but it is basically it.

    traditionally it is decorated with patterns made of cinnamon.

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    Wow, "arroz de marisco" looks really good! It looks a lot like paella.

    I love rice dish with seafood in it, but I can never seem to cook it well. The seafood always gets over-cooked before the rice is done.

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    Maybe you should cook them separately then mix them

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    You are right Duo, I should put seafood right at the end, or I should just read the recipe.

    Quote Originally Posted by Duo
    I don't know in other nations but in Albanian and Turkey we at times mix rice with beans.
    Hmm, beans & rice! Those are great. They are good by themselves, or I often use them as stuffing for my wraps with spiced chicken, cheese, lettuce, tomatos and salsa.
    They are very cheap and come in a bag with seasoning already in it, but I'm sure your family tradition dish is much better than that.

    Oh man! I love learning about foods around the world. Can we please have the food forum in Eupedia too?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo
    Rice has played an important role in European culinary habits for a long time. Risotto has been part of North-Western Italian cuisine since the 14th century, while rice was used in Spain to make dishes such as paella since its introduction by the Arabs in the 8th century. South-Eastern Europeans (Bosnians, Romanians, Greeks, Turks...) eat rice in a variety of dishes, such as pilaf.
    Rice thus predates potatoes, which only arrived in 1537 in Europe, but not widespread before the 17th century. Nowadays, naturally, Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese and Indian food have all become so popular that rice is eaten more than potatoes, especially among younger generations of Europeans, and especially in Britain and Latin countries.
    But rice has been used in traditional dishes in many European countries, and not just Mediterranean ones. One of the most popular desserts in France is named riz au lait (rice pudding), i.e. rice cooked in sweeten milk, and often eaten with brown sugar. All big dairy product makers, like Danone, Yoplait or Nestle, have their riz au lait, which fill the shelves of any supermarket in France, Switzerland or Belgium. Families often make their own at home, as it is one of the easiest dessert to prepare (just cook rice 45min in milk, maybe some vanilla sweetener and/or an egg, then serve in a bowl and add some brown sugar).
    In Belgium, one of the local specialities is the tarte au riz (rice tart), which originally comes from the town of Verviers, between Liege, Maastricht (in the Netherlands) and Aachen (in Germany). You can find it in virtually any Belgian bakery.
    There are many other traditional dishes in France and Belgium served with rice (e.g. with a Provencal sauce), and rice is indeed eaten a lot, as the quantities of rice boxes and bags in these countries' supermarkets confirm.
    With the emergence of fusion cuisines, with strong Asian influences, rice has a assured future in Europe.

    My girlfriend thinks all western food is meat and potatos.

    Very unfair i do say so myself, i try to tell her about other european food, and other british dishes, but, her japanese pride blinds her to the fact europes eating habits are as varied if not more so then japans.

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    western food

    Well tell your japanese girlfriend that se should see how a lot of japanese
    girls are enjoing italian food in our restaurtants in these days in Rome.
    100d type of pasta meet fish mashrooms (porcini) may types of
    pizza and a good italian wine.....
    Some of our plates are a little heavy depends not like the light
    japanese cuisine.....anyway every time i go to a jp restaurant
    after the meal i have more hungry then before.....ah ah
    bye

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    I think when people have no experience or donft have enough experiences with people of other cultures they tend to generalize things. Just like the Japanese girl friend of a poster in here who tends to think all Western foods are meat and potatoes, I find that a lot of the Westerners tend to generalize most of the Asians to be Chinese. This is observed from my experiences and experiences of other Asians.


    Especially when white people get mad, even if you are a citizen of the Western country, they tend to say things like gGo back to Chinah and yet many times these people they think are Chinese are actually Vietnamese, Laotians, Thais, Philippinos, Malays, Indonesianscetc.


    Now I have never had that said to me by a Westerner before because Westerners tend to think I am Japanese or Koreans. My conclusion is I donft think Western people really know what Chinese look like.


    In Italy I had to argue I am not Japanese and people just donft believe me.


    The first time I went to Europe with my sister, we had to argue with Western people within the tour group that we are truly sisters. We even had to pull out our passports to prove to them. They pointed out why we are of different nationalities. Well that's because we are immigrants from Malaysia and after we business immigrated to Australia, my sister kept her Malaysian Passport and just remain as a permanent resident of Australia while I changed my nationality to an Australian citizen. We had the same last name as written in the passport at that time to show them.


    But now not anymore because after I got married my maiden name is no longer in my passport, so does that mean we are no longer sisters? What?! Also that South African girl actually said to me gI don't think you look like a Chinese so therefore you are not one.h gWhat???h I said. Then I said "You have no idea what Chinese people are and how diverse we are."
    The thing is my sister looks quite different from me, she is tan looking and I am fair looking (pale skin). I mean I look like my father and she looks like my mum, what is so difficult to believe? And within the Chinese race we have so many provinces with different ethnic groups. The faces change from Southern part of China to the Northern part. The Southerners are darker, tanner and tend to look closer to Vietnamese while the Northerners look closer to Koreans and Japanese.


    There was also one incident where some Canadian girl in the tour got robbed in Paris. She claimed a Chinese in Paris robbed her.


    I mean how would she know he is a Chinese, since Westerners canft tell from Asian to Asian? Generalizing again, not to mention the majority of the Asians in France are Vietnamese.


    I was talking to my husband the other day about going out next Sunday to watch a movie, and he mentioned gMemoir of a Geisha,h then he asked gMichelle Yeoh is in it, is she Malay?h


    I paused and looked at my husband, then I said gNow... now, I know your wife me is a Chinese ( just not from China) and I appear very pale, but didnft I explain to you there are light skin Chinese and there are tan ones and usually the Southerners are tan and Northerners are pale. I know she was Miss Malaysia when she was young, but Malaysia is a multicultural country and you know this because I have explained to you before, there are 63 percent Malays, 28 percent Chinese and 9 percent Indians. Again I donft think Michelle looks like Malay; I donft think you know what Chinese or Malay looks like.h


    So unless more cultural understanding is achieved, these forms of misunderstanding and generalizing will continue.


    Lastly no offence to the Westerners of what I said, if I suggest anything offensive that is but don't worry Asians do the same.


    Well tell your japanese girlfriend that se should see how a lot of japanese
    girls are enjoing italian food in our restaurtants in these days in Rome.
    100d type of pasta meet fish mashrooms (porcini) may types of
    pizza and a good italian wine.....
    Some of our plates are a little heavy depends not like the light
    japanese cuisine.....anyway every time i go to a jp restaurant
    after the meal i have more hungry then before.....ah ah
    bye

    Due to the cold weather and thus the inability for wheat to grow in Strasbourg, Alsace during the ancient times; people here ate potatoes rather than the baguette as staple food. Then as time has passed, due to the improvement of technology, when they began to be able to access wheat massively they have begun to eat more often the wheat products. Today, the people here besides the potatoes, they tend to eat more pasta and baguette than rice. They even have their own version of pasta, Alsacien pasta. Like I said earlier on in this thread in another post of mine, I donft find rice a very common food for the French people here in this province.


    Pasta is also very popular in Australia among the European decent Australians as well as the Asian Australians.


    Speaking of staple foods, I have had an experience where some Westerners think that Asians only eat rice in Ancient times. That is not true. The food style of a culture is certainly first of all determined by the natural resources that are available for its use. For example Chinese food. It is above all characterized by an assemblage of plants and animals that grew prosperously in the Chinese land for a long time. Chinese cooking is the manipulation of these foodstuffs as basic ingredients.


    Starch Staples: millet, rice, kao-liang, wheat, maize, buckwheat, yam, sweet potato.


    Legumes: soybean, broad bean, pea- nut, mung bean.
    Vegetables: malva, amaranth, Chinese cabbage, mustard green, turnip, radish, mushroom.


    Fruits: peach, apricot, plum, apple, jujube date, pear, crab apple, mountain haw, longan, litchi, orange.


    Meats: pork, dog, beef, mutton, venison, chicken, duck, goose, pheasant, many fishes.


    Spices: red pepper, ginger, garlic, spring onion, cinnamon.

    :150:
    Last edited by Minty; 13-03-06 at 19:53.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Minty
    Just like the Japanese girl friend of a poster in here who tends to think all Western foods are meat and potatoes, I find that a lot of the Westerners tend to generalize most of the Asians to be Chinese.
    But most (white-skinned) East Asians are Chinese (over 80% of them, which certainly qualifies as "most").

    Due to the cold weather and thus the inability for wheat to grow in Strasbourg, Alsace during the ancient times; people here ate potatoes rather than the baguette as staple food.
    There were no potatoes in Europe in ancient times (i.e. until the 5t century or so). They were brought from America in the 16th century, and not widespread until much later. There is more to France than baguette (dozens of other kinds of bread), and Alsace was historically longer part of Germany than France anyway. Bread and potatoes have both been common in France and Germany in the last few hundred years. They do not exclude each others. Potatoes are eaten with warm meals, while bread is more for breakfast...

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    But most (white-skinned) East Asians are Chinese (over 80% of them, which certainly qualifies as "most").

    Hmm then you have a different perspective of how most Chinese look, because from my experiences and experiences of others a lot of the South East Asians are mistaken to be Chinese, while the fair skin Chinese like me are mistaken to be Japanese or Korean.

    I am not sure whether we have more pale skin Chinese than tan ones. I do know that the Northern Chinese are generally lighter than the Southern Chinese.


    But in comparison to South East Asians, Chinese is definitely lighter on average. But it is not just about the skin tones, it is also the faces as well. I donft think Chinese look like South East Asians, but Western people seem to have trouble to tell us apart. For example, I know a Swiss guy who is with a Thai woman, he thinks Thai and Chinese look the same, which I disagree.


    I think Northern Chinese's appearances are closer to Koreans and Japanese while the Southern Chinese are closer to Vietnamese.


    There were no potatoes in Europe in ancient times (i.e. until the 5t century or so). They were brought from America in the 16th century, and not widespread until much later.

    My mistake I shouldnft have said gancient timesh but gin the past.h


    There is more to France than baguette (dozens of other kinds of bread), and Alsace was historically longer part of Germany than France anyway. Bread and potatoes have both been common in France and Germany in the last few hundred years. They do not exclude each others.

    I know about the many different kinds of French breads but baguette is the most common one that people buy, all over the place in the hypermarket I see people with baguette more often than other kinds of breads.


    Potatoes are eaten with warm meals, while bread is more for breakfast...

    Yes I notice the French like croissants or petite pains or different kinds of French breads with confiture and butter for breakfast. I donft eat breakfast though.


    I am married to a Frenchman and for dinner very often at my husbandfs family and friendsf place they serve potatoes or French breads or Alsacien pastas as side dishes for dinner. My husband has also taken me to a lot of different types of French restaurants, and for every meal it is accompanied with fresh French bread on the side, except from memory the dish gTarte flambee.h


    I think the French eat just as much bread for dinner/lunch as they do for breakfast. But I am told the traditional dishes of this province are with potatoes rather than with French breads.
    Last edited by Minty; 14-03-06 at 20:45.

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