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Thread: What is the best food in Europe?

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    Italian food is the best meal as for my taste. European food is adored by many people, because they can find the food they like.

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    Surprised no one mentioned Portuguese Cuisine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aiden View Post
    Pizza is a best food in Europe.You can enjoy Pizza in all over the world but no one can match in taste with Europe.Specially ITALY is a home land for pizza.
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    True, there is some food that we Italians can't eat abroad like pizza, pasta or gelato (ice cream). Anyhow we don't have just this, foreigners always associate Italy with these things, but we have a great variety of dishes.
    The best place to eat abroad for me is France. I love potages.

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    Italian (risotto) and French (croissants), including a good pinot noir are my vote. Bon Apatito!

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    Danish cuisine

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHorsto View Post
    Danish cuisine
    Yuck. I'd prefer German one though. At least those of the Palatinate region.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Balder View Post
    Yuck.
    Danish tradidional main dishes and desserts are simple but delicious, similar to north-german, but better. I don't like the "New danish kitchen" though.
    I find myself surprised to prefer cuisine of a protestant country, because catholic regions are known to cook better.

    I'd prefer German one though. At least those of the Palatinate region.
    Agree, Palatinate food is the best from germany and my 2nd favourite close after danish. I also like polish food, it is fat and unhealthy just like the danish . Some say the czech cuisine is the most original german/austrian one, but I'm not a fan of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHorsto View Post
    Agree, Palatinate food is the best from germany and my 2nd favourite close after danish. I also like polish food, it is fat and unhealthy just like the danish . Some say the czech cuisine is the most original german/austrian one, but I'm not a fan of it.
    The more north one goes in Europe (and in the world in general) the fattier the food becomes. Colder climates require burning more fats to warm the body.

    I like the traditional central european cuisine, but I also like the mediterranean foods with lots of ripe fruit and veggies and seafood.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LeBrok View Post
    The more north one goes in Europe (and in the world in general) the fattier the food becomes. Colder climates require burning more fats to warm the body.
    Yes, and also the kind of fat differs: butter in the north, oil in the south. France is one intermediate example where both is being used.
    Butter is important in the north due to vitamin D supply. In winter I feel a stronger desire to eat butter than in summer.

    I like the traditional central european cuisine, but I also like the mediterranean foods with lots of ripe fruit and veggies and seafood.
    Med. food is of course awesome and from nutritional perspective superior, but I wouldn't like to eat it every day.

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    I might agree with vitamin D

    In south Europe you need much provitamin A, sun then does its job

    also in North you need more Vitamin C which in South is plenty.

    but in Southern foods vitamins B are rare while in North due to more milk and wheat feeding is enough.

    I think that main, in European feeding,problem is that,
    Vitamin C in North,
    Vitamins B in South

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yetos View Post
    I might agree with vitamin D

    In south Europe you need much provitamin A, sun then does its job

    also in North you need more Vitamin C which in South is plenty.

    but in Southern foods vitamins B are rare while in North due to more milk and wheat feeding is enough.

    I think that main, in European feeding,problem is that,
    Vitamin C in North,
    Vitamins B in South
    Many foods are now fortified with vitamins, at least in Canada, in dairy products and wheats. Lack of D3 might be a problem in south Europe too these days, many people try to stay pale and use sunscreen all the time, especially on kids.

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cattel View Post
    Thanks Cattel, that was fun; made me homesick, so it's a good thing I'm leaving soon.

    I'm very traditional when it comes to food, so while I admire the genius and creativity of someone like Massimo Bottura in Modena, food like that is not what I want to eat every day, even if I could afford it. If it's not broke don't fix it, or for another cliche, why mess with perfection. So, I'll stick with nonna's or mamma's food.

    Here he is with his riff on Parmigiano Reggiano for those who aren't familiar with him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Thanks Cattel, that was fun; made me homesick, so it's a good thing I'm leaving soon.

    I'm very traditional when it comes to food, so while I admire the genius and creativity of someone like Massimo Bottura in Modena, food like that is not what I want to eat every day, even if I could afford it. If it's not broke don't fix it, or for another cliche, why mess with perfection. So, I'll stick with nonna's or mamma's food.

    Here he is with his riff on Parmigiano Reggiano for those who aren't familiar with him.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LO4ZXsyI6AU
    I'm glad you liked it, Angela.

    Made me homesick... and salivate. For me, the best food is the Mediterranean.
    Btw, the Italian foods of our immigrants were a bit different. For example, there was no pizza. The diet, not much sophisticated, was based mostly on polenta (by far the main colonial food), formai, salame, pan, vin, galeto, agnolini (you call capeletti), few kinds of pasta, minestrone, radicci...

    Thanks for the video. Indeed, people often do not consider the age issue.
    I'm particularly fan of Grana Padano - which is being produced here too, under license, with Italian know-how.
    http://revistagloborural.globo.com/G...2-1641,00.html
    http://revistagloborural.globo.com/G...1641-2,00.html

    On mamma's food, no way of disagreement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cattel View Post
    I'm glad you liked it, Angela.

    Made me homesick... and salivate. For me, the best food is the Mediterranean.
    Btw, the Italian foods of our immigrants were a bit different. For example, there was no pizza. The diet, not much sophisticated, was based mostly on polenta (by far the main colonial food), formai, salame, pan, vin, galeto, agnolini (you call capeletti), few kinds of pasta, minestrone, radicci...

    Thanks for the video. Indeed, people often do not consider the age issue.
    I'm particularly fan of Grana Padano - which is being produced here too, under license, with Italian know-how.
    http://revistagloborural.globo.com/G...2-1641,00.html
    http://revistagloborural.globo.com/G...1641-2,00.html

    On mamma's food, no way of disagreement.
    I'm gathering that you're talking about South America? A lot of distant relatives of mine went to Argentina. In fact, Italians from Argentina are my best matches on 23andme. They still sometimes come back with their families in August. It seems that they have maintained their "Italianicity" better than Italian Americans even when there's been some intermarriage.

    Americans tend to assume that all Italian cuisine is like Italian-American cuisine, when it really isn't even that faithful a copy of southern cooking, much less like the cooking of my people. (Although that has changed in recent years.) They don't believe me when I say that the first pizza I ever ate was in an American school for Friday lunch. :) Our pizza was called farinata and it was made from ceci flour. The closest to pizza would be our focaccia, with olive oil, salt and maybe onions.



    We also didn't eat pasta every day. Where I come from is sort of where Emilia, Liguria, and Toscana meet, and my mother had to do homage to my father's Emilian roots as well, so she always followed a sort of rough rotation: pasta, minestra, risotto, polenta, gnocci, and so forth for the starches, along with things like roasted or boiled potatoes. We probably ate pasta twice a week.

    Yes, they call them cappelletti in parts of Emilia. My nonna from Parma called the big stuffed pasta tordei. They were dressed with cream and grated parmigiano, or melted butter and salvia. My favorite pasta is still my mother's ravioli alla genovese, though; it was to die for. :)

    I tried to keep up these traditions, but it's difficult when you work ten hours a day, so the more complicated stuff had to wait for holidays.

    They ate a lot of parmigiano in those valleys, obviously. Prosciutto too, of course, since one of my father's villages is a valley over from Langhirano. My favorite cured meats, though, are mortadella and culatello.

    Anyway, I'm also very fond of French food, other than that I'm not too big on organ meets. A little bit goes a very long way for me when it comes to them! I like Spanish food too, and Greek to a certain extent. I've also come to really love Chinese food. It can be very complex and sophisticated.

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    El secreto ibérico (for non-vegetarians) ;)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I'm gathering that you're talking about South America? A lot of distant relatives of mine went to Argentina. In fact, Italians from Argentina are my best matches on 23andme. They still sometimes come back with their families in August. It seems that they have maintained their "Italianicity" better than Italian Americans even when there's been some intermarriage.Americans tend to assume that all Italian cuisine is like Italian-American cuisine, when it really isn't even that faithful a copy of southern cooking, much less like the cooking of my people. (Although that has changed in recent years.) They don't believe me when I say that the first pizza I ever ate was in an American school for Friday lunch. :) Our pizza was called farinata and it was made from ceci flour. The closest to pizza would be our focaccia, with olive oil, salt and maybe onions. We also didn't eat pasta every day. Where I come from is sort of where Emilia, Liguria, and Toscana meet, and my mother had to do homage to my father's Emilian roots as well, so she always followed a sort of rough rotation: pasta, minestra, risotto, polenta, gnocci, and so forth for the starches, along with things like roasted or boiled potatoes. We probably ate pasta twice a week. Yes, they call them cappelletti in parts of Emilia. My nonna from Parma called the big stuffed pasta tordei. They were dressed with cream and grated parmigiano, or melted butter and salvia. My favorite pasta is still my mother's ravioli alla genovese, though; it was to die for. :) I tried to keep up these traditions, but it's difficult when you work ten hours a day, so the more complicated stuff had to wait for holidays. They ate a lot of parmigiano in those valleys, obviously. Prosciutto too, of course, since one of my father's villages is a valley over from Langhirano. My favorite cured meats, though, are mortadella and culatello. Anyway, I'm also very fond of French food, other than that I'm not too big on organ meets. A little bit goes a very long way for me when it comes to them! I like Spanish food too, and Greek to a certain extent. I've also come to really love Chinese food. It can be very complex and sophisticated.
    Jesus! All this talk and images made me hungry.

    Oh, yes! I forgot to define that I was talking about South America.
    Argentina indeed received a lot of immigrants, from many parts of Italy. You probably have distant relatives from São Paulo, which, unlike Southern Brazil, received a significant number of immigrants from Liguria, Tuscany, Emilia, among other regions. But the "Italianicity" is kept more strongly in small towns of the South, where is still spoken a peculiar language, generated from that several brought by immigrants.

    In the Southern colonies, there was no pizza and nothing like it, and pasta was restricted to a few types, such as one that seems "rigatoni" (but we don't use this word). I'm talking about the more traditional cuisine, of course, and it really wasn't so diverse, comparing to what we have today.

    Interesting to know about "tordei". We call "torTei" a very popular pasta that I forgot to mention. It's filled with a kind of pumpkin cream and boiled in water. It's great! Other popular dish is the "fortaia".
    Salvia is the major flavor of our galeto and menarosto, and it's also used for tea.

    I looked in G. Earth the region that you mentioned. I would have not managed to leave such a beautiful place.
    Well, my people were mainly from TV area, but I have fingers near Lake Garda, BL, and even ancestry traces in VI and UD.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cattel View Post
    Jesus! All this talk and images made me hungry.

    Oh, yes! I forgot to define that I was talking about South America.
    Argentina indeed received a lot of immigrants, from many parts of Italy. You probably have distant relatives from São Paulo, which, unlike Southern Brazil, received a significant number of immigrants from Liguria, Tuscany, Emilia, among other regions. But the "Italianicity" is kept more strongly in small towns of the South, where is still spoken a peculiar language, generated from that several brought by immigrants.

    In the Southern colonies, there was no pizza and nothing like it, and pasta was restricted to a few types, such as one that seems "rigatoni" (but we don't use this word). I'm talking about the more traditional cuisine, of course, and it really wasn't so diverse, comparing to what we have today.

    Interesting to know about "tordei". We call "torTei" a very popular pasta that I forgot to mention. It's filled with a kind of pumpkin cream and boiled in water. It's great! Other popular dish is the "fortaia".
    Salvia is the major flavor of our galeto and menarosto, and it's also used for tea.

    I looked in G. Earth the region that you mentioned. I would have not managed to leave such a beautiful place.
    Well, my people were mainly from TV area, but I have fingers near Lake Garda, BL, and even ancestry traces in VI and UD.
    A few of my friends here have accused me of posting "food porn". I do love to cook, and not just Italian food. I'm one of many people who cooked myself all the way through Julia Child's "Mastering the Art of French Cooking". I just wasn't as clever as Julie Powell, so I didn't cash in by writing a book about it.

    One of the things that attracted me to this site is that there are sections for travel, and music, and food etc. I would post on French food, Spanish food etc. but I worry that members from those countries might feel I was trampling on their preserve.

    Here I posted about a memorable wedding banquet I attended in my own little area. It's "a chilometri zero" restaurant, so all locally sourced foods and recipes, which is what I prefer, even where, as here, it meant the restaurant couldn't serve any of the wonderful fish that's only thirty or so minutes away by car.
    http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads...ight=Lunigiana

    Tuscan food is discussed here, in posts 8 and 12:
    http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads...uscan+holidays

    This one is specifically on the food of the Cinque Terre. The links weren't showing, so I fixed it.
    http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads...Cinque%20Terre

    Anyway, tordei was just my grandmother's dialect word for tortelli, which are a form of ravioli. The filling was usually a complicated blend of meat, greens and cheese, but they do indeed have a specialty in Parma called tortelli di zucca:
    http://www.langhiranovalley.it/immag...i_prodotti.jpg

    The only "different" pasta shape I remember from the Veneto is "bigoli".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    A few of my friends here have accused me of posting "food porn". I do love to cook, and not just Italian food. I'm one of many people who cooked myself all the way through Julia Child's "Mastering the Art of French Cooking". I just wasn't as clever as Julie Powell, so I didn't cash in by writing a book about it.

    One of the things that attracted me to this site is that there are sections for travel, and music, and food etc. I would post on French food, Spanish food etc. but I worry that members from those countries might feel I was trampling on their preserve.

    Here I posted about a memorable wedding banquet I attended in my own little area. It's "a chilometri zero" restaurant, so all locally sourced foods and recipes, which is what I prefer, even where, as here, it meant the restaurant couldn't serve any of the wonderful fish that's only thirty or so minutes away by car.
    http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads...ight=Lunigiana

    Tuscan food is discussed here, in posts 8 and 12:
    http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads...uscan+holidays

    This one is specifically on the food of the Cinque Terre. The links weren't showing, so I fixed it.
    http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads...Cinque%20Terre

    Anyway, tordei was just my grandmother's dialect word for tortelli, which are a form of ravioli. The filling was usually a complicated blend of meat, greens and cheese, but they do indeed have a specialty in Parma called tortelli di zucca:
    http://www.langhiranovalley.it/immag...i_prodotti.jpg

    The only "different" pasta shape I remember from the Veneto is "bigoli".
    Thanks for the links. I'm going to explore them. :)

    Well, I'm not myself a great cooker, but certainly I'm a good taster.

    Yes, it's bigoli, but our traditional seems a little different, like this (Jesus!, really nothing to do with rigatoni ):



    This is, I think, the main pasta of immigrants in Southern Brazil. Some people here call it just "massa" or "macarrao". hehe

    And here is the traditional tortei (the filling is lightly sweet):

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    Italian food, such as all sorts of pizzas and pastas.

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