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Thread: Vikings had rare mtDNA haplogroups

  1. #1
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    Arrow Vikings had rare mtDNA haplogroups



    DNA analysis have been made on skeletons from Viking tombs. The Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups found were the same as those found nowadays in Europe, but with a much higher percentage of the now very rare haplogroups I and X.

    Haplogroups I and X are each found in only 1% of the modern European population. Haplogroup I has been found in over 10% of the bodies in tested from Viking cemeteries. Other studies also found mtDNA haplogroup X in Anglo-Saxon skeletons, suggesting a possible Germanic origin.

    Mitochondrial DNA regulates the body's energy production, as well as muscle power and endurance, among others.

    Plos One : Evidence of Authentic DNA from Danish Viking Age Skeletons Untouched by Humans for 1,000 Years

    Y-DNA

    The Y-chromosome side is more consistent with the present incidence. Ancient Norse appeared to belong mostly to Y-DNA haplogroups I, R1a and R1b (S21+). There are nevertheless great disparities between the regions of Scandinavia. Denmark, along with Friesland, northern Germany and the Netherlands, have the highest incidence of hg R1b. Over 40% of Swedes belong to hg I1a, and another 10% to I1c. In Norway, the three haplogroups have about the same share, but with stronger R1b concentration in the South-West and R1a in the North.

    It appears that Scandinavia already shared this variety of haplogroups 2000 years ago. The only thing that has changed over time is the increased blending between the original ethnic groups that converged in northern Europe.

    Science Daily : New Research Refutes Myth Of Pure Scandinavian Race

    Dr David Faux suggested the existence of a genetic connection between Scandinavians and Central Asians (PDF). He argues that the presence of haplogroup Q in Scandinavia might be due to the migration of a Hunnic tribe to Scandinavia during the Great Migrations of the 4th and 5th centuries. The Huns were allied to the Goths, whose homeland was Sweden.

    Dr Faux also hypothetizes a Central Asian origin of haplogroup R1a, found nowadays in Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, Central Asia and South Asia. This haplogroup might have been associated with the ancient Scythians, among others.

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    I believe if you are as knowledgeable about the case as you claim.. you already then know that the MTdna Hg's are drawn from heavily damaged DNA in this case..

    there are repeated examples of researchers publishing spectacular claims about the population genetics their results 'discovered' right before they were up for a grant consideration, funding review..???

    We have had the aimsbury archer, africans, roma gypsies, etc.. all these were published as legitimate and then later we find the DNA was heavily damaged, and the results are 'interpreted' from what could salvaged..

    it would be interesting if true, but making spectacular claims and then alter ...''well this COULD BE the results, we cant say for sure, the dna was too degraded''... no if you ken what you were talking about you would not be so quick to jump at these claims unless they can be confirmed in a double-blind test. These are results that no one can disprove are possible,so they make them and the news-story omits the part about how heavily degraded the sample was..

    this is now one time too many for this same nonsense

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    very, very interesting... so the mtDNA of vikings is shared with the israeli druze... it makes sense when contextualized with the leading theory that the I yDNA haplogroups(which i belong to) were the first to leave the middle east, and followed the melting ice sheats north to scandinavia... whereas the other modern day europeans (the R haplogroups) first went to what is now the russian steppes for several millennium before then migrating west and populating most of continental europe...

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    Viking disease

    Your infomation provided on the vikings, might this include why some in Europe and the UK have inherited the hand problem called the Viking disease.

    Frederic von Ebert

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    Quote Originally Posted by von_Ebert View Post
    Your infomation provided on the vikings, might this include why some in Europe and the UK have inherited the hand problem called the Viking disease.

    Frederic von Ebert
    Actually, there is a form of breast cancer that is much more common in two or three cities in Northern Portugal than anywhere else in the country. This has been attributed to Viking settlement of the area in the 9th through 11th centuries. Until recently, endogamy was strictly practiced in these towns, essentially preserving the Nordic gene pool and creating a greater tendency for the cancer. The city of Povoa de Varzim, just north of Porto, is the best example of this.
    Last edited by Cambrius (The Red); 12-09-09 at 06:45.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaden View Post
    very, very interesting... so the mtDNA of vikings is shared with the israeli druze...
    Israeli Druze are a mix of various people, not necessary native Middle Easterners. They also carry E-V13 & various other lineages along with Hellenic based beliefs that glorify Alexander the Great, for 1000yrs mating amongst themsleves so founder effect at its best.

    IMO I-M170 was never in the Middle East until it spread from Europe, its closest cluster that can be considered a candidate of I* is to the North of Thrace, assuming thats the oldest I-M170its still in Europe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post


    Y-DNA

    The Y-chromosome side is more consistent with the present incidence. Ancient Norse appeared to belong mostly to Y-DNA haplogroups I, R1a and R1b (S21+). There are nevertheless great disparities between the regions of Scandinavia. Denmark, along with Friesland, northern Germany and the Netherlands, have the highest incidence of hg R1b. Over 40% of Swedes belong to hg I1a, and another 10% to I1c. In Norway, the three haplogroups have about the same share, but with stronger R1b concentration in the South-West and R1a in the North.

    It appears that Scandinavia already shared this variety of haplogroups 2000 years ago. The only thing that has changed over time is the increased blending between the original ethnic groups that converged in northern Europe.
    Maybe I missed something, but neither of the articles you quoted seem to have tested any Y-DNA.

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