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Thread: explanation please to those questions

  1. #1
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    explanation please to those questions



    I need an answer please and i would be very thankful to your efforts

    1-Is that right that autosomal-DNA test show where your ancestors came recently from contrawisely to mt-DNA and Y-DNA tests that show where they came from very old times?

    2-Can autosomal-DNA test show from where speaking people were your ancestors?I mean if you were mostly northern european (65% as an instance northern european and 35% southern european)Does that mean that your ancestors came recently from northern europe and were from people who were speaking germanic languages? and if you were mostly continental european(65% as an instance continental european and 25% northern european and 10% subsaharan) does that mean that your ancestors were from celtic speking tribes in europe and came recently from continental europe?

    In a summary:Can autosomal-DNA test show which part of divisions were your ancestors frm like slavic,celtic,germanic,latin,semitic,uralic ....ext?

    3-Is it fit to be a two persons have the mt-DNA and Y-DNA haplogroups`subclades but different in autosomal-DNA?I mean Is it to fit that two persons have the same mt-DNA HAPLOGROUP (H1a as an instance) and the same Y-DNA haplogroup (R1b as an instance) but differ in autosomes (one of them is 70%middle eastern and the other 70% northern european)?

    4-I know that X-chromosome is recombined through generations so it is difficult to make SNP test for it so Could you tell me what the benefit of X-STR test then is?
    Last edited by motatalea; 28-03-09 at 18:26.

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    Quote Originally Posted by motatalea View Post
    1-Is that right that autosomal-DNA test show where your ancestors came recently from contrawisely to mt-DNA and Y-DNA tests that show where they came from very old times?

    2-Can autosomal-DNA test show from where speaking people were your ancestors?I mean if you were mostly northern european (65% as an instance northern european and 35% southern european)Does that mean that your ancestors came recently from northern europe and were from people who were speaking germanic languages? and if you were mostly continental european(65% as an instance continental european and 25% northern european and 10% subsaharan) does that mean that your ancestors were from celtic speking tribes in europe and came recently from continental europe?
    Autosomal DNA means all the DNA of all chromosomes except X and Y (and mtDNA, which is outside the cell's nucleus, so outside the chromosomes).

    Autosomal DNA recombines at every generation, so instead of having one ethnic association, a person will typically be an admixture of several ethnicities. It all depends at what level we compare "ethnicities". It is very easy to distinguish European, East Asian or sub-Saharan African autosomal DNA and give a percentage for each. Middle Easterners, Indians and Central Asians will usually have a strong admixture of European and East Asian.

    New comparative studies make it easier to distinguish between northern, southern, western and eastern Europeans, for example, but at present no (commercial) DNA test can give the admixture at a national or regional level. It will come in due time though.


    In a summary:Can autosomal-DNA test show which part of divisions were your ancestors frm like slavic,celtic,germanic,latin,semitic,uralic ....ext?
    Not yet, or at least not accurately. It is also important to keep in mind that language groups do not often coincide with genetics. For example, Moroccans, Tunisians, Egyptians, Lebanese and Yemeni are all Arabic speakers, but all completely different in terms of DNA. On the contrary, Turks and Greeks may think of themselves as ethnically different because they speak a completely different language and have a different religion, but their DNA is very close. That's why it would make more sense to use a single Greco-Anatolian ethnic group for regional comparisons.

    3-Is it fit to be a two persons have the mt-DNA and Y-DNA haplogroups`subclades but different in autosomal-DNA?I mean Is it to fit that two persons have the same mt-DNA HAPLOGROUP (H1a as an instance) and the same Y-DNA haplogroup (R1b as an instance) but differ in autosomes (one of them is 70%middle eastern and the other 70% northern european)?
    I don't understand your question. What do you mean by "fit" ? It is possible that two people with completely different autosomal DNA have the same Y-DNA and mtDNA haplogroup, but unlikely.

    4-I know that X-chromosome is recombined through generations so it is difficult to make SNP test for it so Could you tell me what the benefit of X-STR test then is?
    At present, the only benefit of X-STR tests is to confirm that two individuals are related within a few generations. It may be useful for a woman who was adopted and wants to know if someone is really their biological parent or sibling. But it's more effective with a full-scope DNA test like 23andMe. X-STR alone is already outdated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    Autosomal DNA means all the DNA of all chromosomes except X and Y (and mtDNA, which is outside the cell's nucleus, so outside the chromosomes).

    Autosomal DNA recombines at every generation, so instead of having one ethnic association, a person will typically be an admixture of several ethnicities. It all depends at what level we compare "ethnicities". It is very easy to distinguish European, East Asian or sub-Saharan African autosomal DNA and give a percentage for each. Middle Easterners, Indians and Central Asians will usually have a strong admixture of European and East Asian.

    New comparative studies make it easier to distinguish between northern, southern, western and eastern Europeans, for example, but at present no (commercial) DNA test can give the admixture at a national or regional level. It will come in due time though.




    Not yet, or at least not accurately. It is also important to keep in mind that language groups do not often coincide with genetics. For example, Moroccans, Tunisians, Egyptians, Lebanese and Yemeni are all Arabic speakers, but all completely different in terms of DNA. On the contrary, Turks and Greeks may think of themselves as ethnically different because they speak a completely different language and have a different religion, but their DNA is very close. That's why it would make more sense to use a single Greco-Anatolian ethnic group for regional comparisons.



    I don't understand your question. What do you mean by "fit" ? It is possible that two people with completely different autosomal DNA have the same Y-DNA and mtDNA haplogroup, but unlikely.



    At present, the only benefit of X-STR tests is to confirm that two individuals are related within a few generations. It may be useful for a woman who was adopted and wants to know if someone is really their biological parent or sibling. But it's more effective with a full-scope DNA test like 23andMe. X-STR alone is already outdated.
    Thank you too much
    but iam really sorry for inconvemience there are some questions
    Is that right that M1 mt-DNA haplogroup is belong to the sub-saharan haplogroups?
    2-Is that right that L2 and L3 are a sub saharan haplogroups?
    3- Could you tell me which people mt-DNA haplogroup U6 represents the higheast proporation on them are?

    4-What is the specific mt-DNA haplogroup of afro-asiatic speakers?Is it U6 or L3 or M1 or all of them?

    5-I have heared that mt-DNA haplogroup H1a has the most proportion in western europe and i heared also that H1b has the most frequency in eastern europe but my question is Is it right that the H1a haplogroup has the most proportion too in eastern europe like in western europe?

    6-Why they donnot study the gene in the autosomal-dna which responsible for physical features to determine why people are so different in their appearence to this degree?

    I really would be too thankful and take care

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    Quote Originally Posted by motatalea View Post
    Is that right that M1 mt-DNA haplogroup is belong to the sub-saharan haplogroups?
    Not exclusively. M1 is found in eastern Africa and the Middle East.

    2-Is that right that L2 and L3 are a sub saharan haplogroups?
    Yes. Haplogroup L is the oldest of all mtDNA haplogroups. L0, L1, L2 and L3 all originated (and are still most common) in sub-Saharan Africa.

    3- Could you tell me which people mt-DNA haplogroup U6 represents the higheast proporation on them are?
    U6 is typical of the people of North Africa. Its highest proportion is found among the Berbers of the Maghreb.

    4-What is the specific mt-DNA haplogroup of afro-asiatic speakers?Is it U6 or L3 or M1 or all of them?
    All of them, but U6 is more common in North-West Africa, M1 in the Middle-East and North-East Africa, and L2/L3 in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Keep in mind that there are many other haplogroups in the Middle East and North Africa. The most common is by far haplogroup H, like in Europe. Haplogroups HV, J, T, U and K are also common among Afro-Asiatic speakers. You could say that Europeans, Berbers and Arabs share over half of their mtDNA haplogroups (but not necessarily the same subclades). It is especially the Y-DNA that distinguish ethnicities apart.

    5-I have heared that mt-DNA haplogroup H1a has the most proportion in western europe and i heared also that H1b has the most frequency in eastern europe but my question is Is it right that the H1a haplogroup has the most proportion too in eastern europe like in western europe?
    H1 has the highest frequency in Western Europe, especially in Iberia, Western France, Britain and Norway. It is also found in the Maghreb and in Berber people as far east as Egypt (I guess that is why you ask). I am not sure about the proportion of H1a and H1b within H1.

    6-Why they donnot study the gene in the autosomal-dna which responsible for physical features to determine why people are so different in their appearence to this degree?
    It is being studied, but is is much more complex than Y-DNA or mtDNA haplogroups. Genetic research is still quite slow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    Not exclusively. M1 is found in eastern Africa and the Middle East.



    Yes. Haplogroup L is the oldest of all mtDNA haplogroups. L0, L1, L2 and L3 all originated (and are still most common) in sub-Saharan Africa.



    U6 is typical of the people of North Africa. Its highest proportion is found among the Berbers of the Maghreb.



    All of them, but U6 is more common in North-West Africa, M1 in the Middle-East and North-East Africa, and L2/L3 in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Keep in mind that there are many other haplogroups in the Middle East and North Africa. The most common is by far haplogroup H, like in Europe. Haplogroups HV, J, T, U and K are also common among Afro-Asiatic speakers. You could say that Europeans, Berbers and Arabs share over half of their mtDNA haplogroups (but not necessarily the same subclades). It is especially the Y-DNA that distinguish ethnicities apart.



    H1 has the highest frequency in Western Europe, especially in Iberia, Western France, Britain and Norway. It is also found in the Maghreb and in Berber people as far east as Egypt (I guess that is why you ask). I am not sure about the proportion of H1a and H1b within H1.



    It is being studied, but is is much more complex than Y-DNA or mtDNA haplogroups. Genetic research is still quite slow.
    Merci becoup ,thank you my friend

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    Not exclusively. M1 is found in eastern Africa and the Middle East.



    Yes. Haplogroup L is the oldest of all mtDNA haplogroups. L0, L1, L2 and L3 all originated (and are still most common) in sub-Saharan Africa.



    U6 is typical of the people of North Africa. Its highest proportion is found among the Berbers of the Maghreb.



    All of them, but U6 is more common in North-West Africa, M1 in the Middle-East and North-East Africa, and L2/L3 in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Keep in mind that there are many other haplogroups in the Middle East and North Africa. The most common is by far haplogroup H, like in Europe. Haplogroups HV, J, T, U and K are also common among Afro-Asiatic speakers. You could say that Europeans, Berbers and Arabs share over half of their mtDNA haplogroups (but not necessarily the same subclades). It is especially the Y-DNA that distinguish ethnicities apart.



    H1 has the highest frequency in Western Europe, especially in Iberia, Western France, Britain and Norway. It is also found in the Maghreb and in Berber people as far east as Egypt (I guess that is why you ask). I am not sure about the proportion of H1a and H1b within H1.



    It is being studied, but is is much more complex than Y-DNA or mtDNA haplogroups. Genetic research is still quite slow.
    please there is question Mr maciamo :does the mutation happen to the haplogroup itself or its markers? i mean if two persons have different haplogroups Is it possible that a mutation occur to them and convert their haplogroups to be the same? I mean if a person has haplogroup G for instance ,Is it possible that a mutation occur to him and make him has a different haplogroup like R1b ?
    In summary :Do the nature or climate or enviroment affect on the kind of haplogroup so that the people who live in the same region and climate have the same haplogroup?

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    Quote Originally Posted by motatalea View Post
    please there is question Mr maciamo :does the mutation happen to the haplogroup itself or its markers? i mean if two persons have different haplogroups Is it possible that a mutation occur to them and convert their haplogroups to be the same? I mean if a person has haplogroup G for instance ,Is it possible that a mutation occur to him and make him has a different haplogroup like R1b ?
    In summary :Do the nature or climate or enviroment affect on the kind of haplogroup so that the people who live in the same region and climate have the same haplogroup?
    Haplogroups are define by many mutations, not just one. Have a look at this haplogroup tree Mutations are cumulative. R1b has all the mutation of R1, which has the mutations of R*, which has the mutations of P*, which has the mutations of K*, which has the mutations of IJK*, which has the mutations of F*, etc. until the common male ancestor to all humans on Earth (called "Y" on the tree).

    The * means that it is the haplogroup without subclades. R1b has all the mutations of K*, but it lacks the mutations of K2 (P60, P304, P308), for example.

    Some mutations exist in more than one haplogroup. For example, M64 defines both haplogroup D2 and R1a1a3. But That is only one of many mutations for each haplogroup. D2 will also have the mutations M1/YAP, M145/P205, M203, P144, P153, P165, P167, P183, M55, M57, M174, M179, M359.1, P37.1, P190, 12f2.2 which R1a1a3 does not have. R1a1a3 has even more mutations than D2 does not have.

    Knowing only one mutation is not good enough to determine the haplogroup. You have to test hundreds of SNP's and count all those that you have or don't have.

    MtDNA haplogroups are more difficult to determine with the basic HVR1 and HVR2 tests because many mutations happen in many haplogroups. That's why it mistakes in haplogroup happens often for cheap mtDNA tests. It's also safer to test the coding region too (some companies call it "backbone SNP test").

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