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Thread: Beginner questions about Y-DNA

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  1. #1
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    Beginner questions about Y-DNA

    I've been interested in Y-DNA recently but since I've never studied anything about it in depth (I am studying something completely different) and my research didn't answer some of my questions, I'd like to ask some. I hope you don't mind asking newbie questions here and please excuse my ignorance.

    How exactly is it determined? When I checked the Y-DNA frequency table I noticed that each country has a certain percentage of a certain haplogroup. For example, if there is 82% of R1b in Wales, does that mean that 82% of the people tested carry this specific haplogroup only?

    Furthermore, since females don't have a Y-chromosome, does that mean that each person will have the same haplogroup as his father? Does the mother have any effect on the Y-DNA of the offspring? My guess is that since her father has a Y-chromosome then it could somehow pass to the offspring but this is just my made up theory and it is probably false.

    Also, does Y-DNA have any effect on a person's appearance? I guess it would be relatively easy to distinguish E1b (non-native European) from I1 (native European) but what about native European groups such as R1b and R1a - does each of them have some certain characteristics such as hair colour, eye colour, skin tone etc?

    Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Heathen View Post
    I've been interested in Y-DNA recently but since I've never studied anything about it in depth (I am studying something completely different) and my research didn't answer some of my questions, I'd like to ask some. I hope you don't mind asking newbie questions here and please excuse my ignorance.

    How exactly is it determined? When I checked the Y-DNA frequency table I noticed that each country has a certain percentage of a certain haplogroup. For example, if there is 82% of R1b in Wales, does that mean that 82% of the people tested carry this specific haplogroup only?

    Furthermore, since females don't have a Y-chromosome, does that mean that each person will have the same haplogroup as his father? Does the mother have any effect on the Y-DNA of the offspring? My guess is that since her father has a Y-chromosome then it could somehow pass to the offspring but this is just my made up theory and it is probably false.

    Also, does Y-DNA have any effect on a person's appearance? I guess it would be relatively easy to distinguish E1b (non-native European) from I1 (native European) but what about native European groups such as R1b and R1a - does each of them have some certain characteristics such as hair colour, eye colour, skin tone etc?

    Thanks.
    Yes, 82% of the males of Wales is R1b (anyway there're many different subtypes of R1b)

    Y-chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) is passed from father to son along an all-male line (highlighted in blue). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed from mother to child along an all-female line (highlighted in pink). Males pass Y-DNA to their sons, but do not pass mtDNA to their children.



    Y-DNA and mt-DNA are just two ascendency lines of millions. They only show your greatgreatgreatgreat...................... grandfather and your greatgreatgreatgreat..................... grandmother.

    If you want to know your real genetic composition/ascendency, you should take an autosomal test.

    Y-DNA is just useful when we're talking about percentage in groups or migrations but in a individual sense isn't important. So... no, you could be 7/8 black and you would be R1b if your white great grandfather was R1b. Anyway, for example, there are a correlation between percentage of R1b and percentage of Red Hair. The same to I1 and Blond Hair.

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    Also, does Y-DNA have any effect on a person's appearance?

    It depends if it is a recent migration or not. I have a seen a blond man, with blue eyes, whose father was also blond with blue eyes typical Scandinavian looking (going back few hundred years, as far as memory serves). The whole male lineage turned out to be E1b1a.

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    Thank you. How far back could the male lineage be traced and also does it ever change?
    If you want to know your real genetic composition/ascendency, you should take an autosomal test...Y-DNA is just useful when we're talking about percentage in groups or migrations but in a individual sense isn't important.
    Autosomal tests = Y-DNA and mtDNA?
    Last edited by Heathen; 28-04-11 at 21:57.

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