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Thread: Most important non-British colonial folkways to America

  1. #1
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    Most important non-British colonial folkways to America



    By now, I hope anyone who is interested in the origin of the culture of the modern United States is familiar with Fischer's Albion's Seed. For those who aren't, the premise is simple: four specific migrations, namely (1) the New England Puritans, (2) the Virginia Cavaliers and their servants, (3) the Delaware Valley Quakers, and (4) the Backcountry borderlanders and Scots-Irish, had tremendous impacts on the culture of America, and specifically shaped the regions of the modern US they migrated to. These weren't the only migrations from Britain to the modern US, of course. There were others, like the Pilgrims, the Jamestowne colonists, the Rhode Island Baptists, etc., but none had nearly the same effect that those four had.

    So, I was wondering if we could identify a similar set of non-British colonial (pre-Revolution), European folkways, that had uniquely important impacts on what would become the United States. Perhaps, following Fischer, a top 4. It would also be great to qualify what these impacts consist of in terms of cultural, religious, political, etc. aspects.

    Some candidates off the top of my head:
    -The Palatines
    -The Huguenots
    -The Dutch settlers of New Netherland
    -The Swedish settlers of New Sweden
    -The Mennonites (specifically those from the Krefeld area who brought Plattdeutsch, rather than the Palatine/Swiss/Alsatian group who were largely part of the Palatine migration)
    -The Jewish migrants to Newport
    -The Acadians of the Great Expulsion

    Any other ideas, or attempts to rank the above?
    Last edited by sparkey; 12-05-12 at 00:39. Reason: To be clear: non-British but still European

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    How about the large-scale Asian immigration which was a huge part of popularizing California?

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    Sorry, forget what I said, missed the "pre-revolution" part.

    Seems like you mentioned all the big ones :S

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