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Thread: Curing addictions.

  1. #1
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    Curing addictions.



    I found this article about curing addictions in a Canadian newspaper. If these scientists are on the right track, their work could help people all around the world.

    "Western University scientists say they’ve made a discovery that could some day stem the scourge of opiate addiction in Canada by “essentially switching an addicted brain back to a non-addicted brain.”
    A team from the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry has identified the molecular pathway in the brain that’s switched on during addiction and controls the memories of euphoria that can send people back to drug use.
    That raises the possibility someday of blocking the pathway and the memories, and, as a result, preventing relapses.
    “This is an important step forward,” research team leader Steven Laviolette said.
    “Addiction is obviously a huge social issue. It’s a very important issue that touches most of our lives in one way or another. Reversing the effects of what opiates do to the brain that lead to this compulsive addiction behaviour . . . that is the ultimate target of these experiments.”
    Researchers are increasingly viewing addiction as a learning or memory disorder, Laviolette said in an interview.
    “One of the biggest problems preventing someone addicted to opiates from successfully breaking the habit is the problem of relapse. Someone addicted to opiates will often encounter some stimulus in their environment that triggers these memories that have been associated with the euphoric effects of opiates, be it heroin or prescription narcotics.”

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    in fact this concern reflex system? but the seat is not only in the brain but concern all the autonomic nervous system including the stomach and the risk of loss of apetite, see breathing?
    The remedy he could not become the worst evil and how to isolate the desired effects of unwanted effects.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aberdeen View Post
    I found this article about curing addictions in a Canadian newspaper. If these scientists are on the right track, their work could help people all around the world.

    "Western University scientists say they’ve made a discovery that could some day stem the scourge of opiate addiction in Canada by “essentially switching an addicted brain back to a non-addicted brain.”
    A team from the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry has identified the molecular pathway in the brain that’s switched on during addiction and controls the memories of euphoria that can send people back to drug use.
    That raises the possibility someday of blocking the pathway and the memories, and, as a result, preventing relapses.
    “This is an important step forward,” research team leader Steven Laviolette said.
    “Addiction is obviously a huge social issue. It’s a very important issue that touches most of our lives in one way or another. Reversing the effects of what opiates do to the brain that lead to this compulsive addiction behaviour . . . that is the ultimate target of these experiments.”
    Researchers are increasingly viewing addiction as a learning or memory disorder, Laviolette said in an interview.
    “One of the biggest problems preventing someone addicted to opiates from successfully breaking the habit is the problem of relapse. Someone addicted to opiates will often encounter some stimulus in their environment that triggers these memories that have been associated with the euphoric effects of opiates, be it heroin or prescription narcotics.”
    Very interesting. Another avenue of research might lie in identifying and analyzing the genetics of people who don't get that euphoric feeling. For some people, not only is there no euphoria, but taking them results in anxiety and nightmares and sometimes in nausea. Of course, that's not an optimal situation either, because they're very important in pain management, and when people are in pain, they don't heal very well.

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    curing addictions is a cool subject

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