It's amazing to me how they went out into the sea in these things. Brave people.

See:

http://www.archaeology.org/news/5386...l-replica-ship

"The Times of Israel reports that a replica of a 2,500-year-old ship has been christened the Ma’agan Michael II, for the kibbutz where a fifth-century B.C. shipwreck was found in 1985. The first Ma’agan Michael was constructed of Aleppo pine and oak, and is thought to have measured about 37 feet long and 13 feet wide. Ballast at the wreck site is thought to have come from the Greek island of Euboea and southern Cyprus. Archaeologists also recovered a carpenter’s toolbox from the site, and used traditional tools to build the replica ship. After the ceremony, the Ma’agan Michael II was sailed in the Bay of Haifa. Archaeologists are preparing to take the vessel on a three-day journey from Haifa down the Mediterranean coast to Herzliya, and test ways that ancient sailors might have sailed against the sea’s winds and currents. “We have no idea how they did it,” commented archaeologist Deborah Cvikel of Haifa University."





This is about a replica of a 2500 years old Athenian warship: