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Brooker
05-10-04, 10:21
It's always been a dream of mine to go to space. SpaceShipOne has just brought all of us one step closer to being able to do just that.


MOJAVE, CALIFORNIA -- Human flight took a significant step forward today as the privately built SpaceShipOne flew into suborbital space for the second time in five days, securing the $10 million Ansari X Prize.

With pilot Brian Binnie at the controls, SpaceShipOne rocketed to a winning height of 367,442 feet (112 kilometers), setting a new altitude record for the craft and proving that private industry can build a viable vehicle for sending paying passengers to space.


Binnie was the 434th human to have left our planet to go into space, Searfoss noted.

Complete story...
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/xprize2_success_041004.html

Duo
05-10-04, 21:30
Hmm, I don't know that I would trust this thing yet, I mean yeah its a successful thing and what not, but I'd wait a little before I would buy a tiket, which I would need about lots of money that I dont have, so I dont see it happening soon. And also, spaceship one doesnt reallly go into space, barely just the edge, It doesn't go very beyond earth's atmosphere if it leaves it at all. Anyhow, this is a good firs step. Maybe in the next 20/30 years who knows they will develop a much better/bigger/stronger aircraft that will really allow us go into space safely and in a reasonable price.

Fantt
05-10-04, 21:31
Someone's already offered a $50 million prize for getting a private orbiting craft into space with a crew of 7. We're on the way.

Glenn
06-10-04, 01:13
It may be just barely the edge, but that's just nitpicking to me. The point here is that the craft gets up to where air resistance virtually becomes a non-factor, and it allows for extreme supersonic speeds. Going from New York to Tokyo in 3 hrs. sounds great to me!

By the way, I remember hearing about this sort of thing on the Discovery Channel a few years ago. It seems that some people think that the Reagan administration had a project of this nature in the budget, called the "Aurora Project."

Lina Inverse
06-10-04, 01:17
Yes, I always suspected that it would be SpaceShipOne to cash in the price :haihai:

bossel
06-10-04, 02:48
By the way, I remember hearing about this sort of thing on the Discovery Channel a few years ago. It seems that some people think that the Reagan administration had a project of this nature in the budget, called the "Aurora Project."
AFAIK, several nations had plans for sub-orbital jets, but all didn't get realized for being too expensive. That's where I see the main advance now: the contestants for the X-Prize proved that it doesn't have to be multi-billion dollar enterprise.

Sadly I probably won't live to see space travel become a common occurrence (& experience it myself). I suppose, during my life time it will only be an opportunity for the rich.

Brooker
06-10-04, 06:15
Hmm, I don't know that I would trust this thing yet, I mean yeah its a successful thing and what not, but I'd wait a little before I would buy a tiket, which I would need about lots of money that I dont have, so I dont see it happening soon. And also, spaceship one doesnt reallly go into space, barely just the edge, It doesn't go very beyond earth's atmosphere if it leaves it at all. Anyhow, this is a good firs step. Maybe in the next 20/30 years who knows they will develop a much better/bigger/stronger aircraft that will really allow us go into space safely and in a reasonable price.

Yeah, but the Wright Brothers first flight flew about twenty feet into the air and flew for less than a minute I think. Just because you couldn't buy a first class ticket to Tokyo the next week doesn't mean that it wasn't an incredibly important event and a sign of things to come in the future. I think the situation with SpaceShipOne is exactly the same.

Winter
06-10-04, 20:50
Ah, but this is the age of impatience, Booker.

Fantt
06-10-04, 20:57
Winter, that is a truly awesome pic in your sig.

Lina Inverse
07-10-04, 03:59
Winter, that is a truly awesome pic in your sig.
Agreed, that pic rules! :cool:

Miss_apollo7
08-10-04, 14:59
I am afraid that I can't afford such a ride....would be fantastic though! :-) Maybe I can go when I become an old lady with blue hair, fake teeth and grandchildren...?? :D By that time, it is maybe cheaper for us to get a ticket, and the technology has improved...and I have had time to save up and collect my huge pension.... :D :D

Brooker
08-10-04, 20:13
Your children might be able to go.

Miss_apollo7
10-10-04, 00:00
Your children might be able to go.

HAHA..:D Yeah!! And they can come down to earth and tell me about the experience, as I'd be an old lady by then! :D

Melkor
10-10-04, 00:05
Well bossel, you could always go the route of cryogenic freezing and hope you survive the initial freezing. Then you just wait until someone figures out how to thaw a frozen person without kill them. By that time, space travel shouldn't be too much trouble. Besides, think of the interest your money would have accumulated in the mean time.

Keep in mind though, that I'm not recommending that course of action.

bossel
10-10-04, 01:19
Well bossel, you could always go the route of cryogenic freezing and hope you survive the initial freezing. Then you just wait until someone figures out how to thaw a frozen person without kill them. By that time, space travel shouldn't be too much trouble. Besides, think of the interest your money would have accumulated in the mean time.
Nice idea, but after I paid for the freezing I would have to be very afraid of the accumulated interest. For it would be on a loan, & I would have to pay several fortunes. :(

Fantt
10-10-04, 06:02
Bossel, you just pay now for enough life insurance to cover freezing your head. When you die, your beneficiary payout will be the cryo firm. When you wake up you get the extra bonus of a new body!

You may think I'm joking, but I'm not (http://www.alcor.org/). Well, maybe a bit.