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Maciamo
27-11-04, 03:48
If you were an influencial politician and had enough power to change (or leave) a few of these things in your country or your ideal country, what would you do ?

1) ID Cards :
a) compulsory for everybody and must be carried at alll times
b) compulsory for everybody but doesn't have to be carried all the time
c) optional (only those who want one can get one)
d) no ID cards for everybody

2) Driving licence :
a) from under 16 years old
b) from 16 years old
c) from 17 years old
d) from 18 years old
e) from over 18 years old

3) Blood group card
a) compulsory for everybody and should be carried at alll times in case of accident
b) tests compulsory for everybody to be sure to know one's blood group
c) optional (only those who ask for one get one)

4) Medical Services
a) medical services 100% paid by the State (through taxes)
b) mostly reimbursed by the State
c) only miniminally reimbursed by the State
d) not subsidized at all (full cost for those who do not have a private health insurance)

5) Dual nationality
a) allowed
b) allowed for some special cases only (children born of parents of different nationalities, etc.)
c) never or very rarely allowed

6) Military service (conscription/draft)
a) compulsory for men and women
b) compulsory for men
c) compulsory for men except university student, objection of conscience, civil service, homosexuality, exemption payment, or other reason.
d) voluntary (although not profesional career in army, but just 1-year or so)
e) no military service apart from professional army

7) Legal drinking age :
a) no minimum
b) 12 or under
c) 13-15
d) 16-17
e) 18-19
f) 20 or over

8) Education :
a) should be completely free for both private and public schools/universities (teachers paid by the State)
b) only public schools/universities should be free
c) all schools/universities should be only partly subsidized by the State
d) no schools/universities should be subsidized at all

I would go for :
1)b or c
2)d
3)a or b
4)a or b
5) a
6) d or e
7) a, b or c
8) a

The best country for me would be the UK which matches all my criteria.

The following countries have things I don't like :
Belgium and France have compulsory ID cards that must be carried at all times.
France, Italy and many other countries have compulsory military service. Belgium and Japan don't accept dual nationality. Japan has a too high drinking age and schools & universities are not free.

The US has no ID cards at all, the driving age is too low, the drinking age too high, lacks medical and educational subsidies from the State.

Please don't go off-topic.

Mimmy_08
27-11-04, 06:43
If you had the power to change your country's system, what would you choose ?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you were an influencial politician and had enough power to change (or leave) a few of these things in your country or your ideal country, what would you do ?

1) ID Cards :
a) compulsory for everybody and must be carried at alll times
b) compulsory for everybody but doesn't have to be carried all the time
c) optional (only those who want one can get one)
d) no ID cards for everybody

2) Driving licence :
a) from under 16 years old
b) from 16 years old
c) from 17 years old
d) from 18 years old
e) from over 18 years old

3) Blood group card
a) compulsory for everybody and should be carried at alll times in case of accident
b) tests compulsory for everybody to be sure to know one's blood group
c) optional (only those who ask for one get one)

4) Medical Services
a) medical services 100% paid by the State (through taxes)
b) mostly reimbursed by the State
c) only miniminally reimbursed by the State
d) not subsidized at all (full cost for those who do not have a private health insurance)

5) Dual nationality
a) allowed
b) allowed for some special cases only (children born of parents of different nationalities, etc.)
c) never or very rarely allowed


6) Military service (conscription/draft)
a) compulsory for men and women
b) compulsory for men
c) compulsory for men except university student, objection of conscience, civil service, homosexuality, exemption payment, or other reason.
d) voluntary (although not profesional career in army, but just 1-year or soe) no military service apart from professional army

7) Legal drinking age :
a) no minimum
b) 12 or under
c) 13-15
d) 16-17
e) 18-19
f) 20 or over

8) Education :
a) should be completely free for both private and public schools/universities (teachers paid by the State)
b) only public schools/universities should be free
c) all schools/universities should be only partly subsidized by the State
d) no schools/universities should be subsidized at all

Nothingness
27-11-04, 07:02
1)a
2)b
3)a
4)a
5)c
6)d
7)f
8)a

jeisan
27-11-04, 08:18
1) ID Cards :
b) compulsory for everybody but doesn't have to be carried all the time

2) Driving licence :
b) from 16 years old
ive been driving since i was 12...


3) Blood group card
c) optional (only those who ask for one get one)
i actually dont have much of an opinion on this one...

4) Medical Services
a) medical services 100% paid by the State (through taxes)

5) Dual nationality
a) allowed

6) Military service (conscription/draft)
a) compulsory for men and women
2 years of military service or volunteer work, some cort of civil service, very much similar to the system in germany, 2 years for the state to "pay" for free education and health care.

7) Legal drinking age :
a) no minimum
teach responsible drinking not no drinking...

8) Education :
a) should be completely free for both private and public schools/universities (teachers paid by the State)



The US has no ID cards at all...
not true, our drivers lisences are our ID cards. if you wanted just an ID card youd have to get it from the department of motor vehicles anyway. also most states require persons over the age of 18 to be carrying an ID at all times, though its rather loosely enforced...

Maciamo
27-11-04, 11:05
not true, our drivers lisences are our ID cards. if you wanted just an ID card youd have to get it from the department of motor vehicles anyway. also most states require persons over the age of 18 to be carrying an ID at all times, though its rather loosely enforced...

Driving licences are not ID cards. You need to pass a driving test to get it. Real ID cards are available to everybody, and in countries where it exist also for children (eg, in Belgium compulsory from 12 years old, but optional children ID exist before that). ID cards also mention some info like social security number that driving licences don't. What's more an ID card can be used as a passport within certain countries (like EU countries + Switzerland + Lichtestein, Andorra, Norway...), but not driving licences.



6) Military service (conscription/draft)
a) compulsory for men and women
2 years of military service or volunteer work, some cort of civil service, very much similar to the system in germany, 2 years for the state to "pay" for free education and health care.

The only country I know where military service is compulsory for both men and women is Israel.

What's the point of forcing everyone to join the army for 2 years to get free education and healthcare if it's already free (like in the UK). Then I feel that compulsory military service is forcing people to waste 1 or 2 years of their life. I personally would rather change nationality than be forced to join the army or a civil service or forcing me to do anything else I don't want to for a long period of time. School was the worse so far, a complete waste of time for I don't think I have learnt anything that I could not have learnt by myself in a quarter of the time and a more enjoyable manner. University is different as at least we can choose to attend or not and choose the subject(s).

Miss_apollo7
27-11-04, 16:00
My turn now: :-) My answers highlighted in BLUE.

1) ID Cards :
a) compulsory for everybody and must be carried at alll times
b) compulsory for everybody but doesn't have to be carried all the time
c) optional (only those who want one can get one)
d) no ID cards for everybody

2) Driving licence :
a) from under 16 years old
b) from 16 years old
c) from 17 years old
d) from 18 years old
e) from over 18 years old

3) Blood group card
a) compulsory for everybody and should be carried at alll times in case of accident
b) tests compulsory for everybody to be sure to know one's blood group
c) optional (only those who ask for one get one)

4) Medical Services
a) medical services 100% paid by the State (through taxes)
b) mostly reimbursed by the State
c) only miniminally reimbursed by the State
d) not subsidized at all (full cost for those who do not have a private health insurance)

5) Dual nationality
a) allowed
b) allowed for some special cases only (children born of parents of different nationalities, etc.)
c) never or very rarely allowed

6) Military service (conscription/draft)
a) compulsory for men and women
b) compulsory for men
c) compulsory for men except university student, objection of conscience, civil service, homosexuality, exemption payment, or other reason.
d) voluntary (although not profesional career in army, but just 1-year or so)
e) no military service apart from professional army

7) Legal drinking age :
a) no minimum
b) 12 or under
c) 13-15
d) 16-17
e) 18-19
f) 20 or over

8) Education :
a) should be completely free for both private and public schools/universities (teachers paid by the State)b) only public schools/universities should be free
c) all schools/universities should be only partly subsidized by the State
d) no schools/universities should be subsidized at all


That is why Denmark and England suit me... :balloon:

Duo
27-11-04, 17:36
man I feel the socialism engulfing from the European point of view, I am for all the answers that Miss Apollo said, exept the dual nationality, I would allow it, maybe because I am from a nation that emigrates a lot. I saw the americans with the driving age in 16 and stuff, that is totally crazy for me, give sm dumb teenager a huge SUV but don't let him drink until 21 :S. I will never get it :S

CC1
27-11-04, 17:56
Driving licences are not ID cards. You need to pass a driving test to get it. Real ID cards are available to everybody, and in countries where it exist also for children (eg, in Belgium compulsory from 12 years old, but optional children ID exist before that). ID cards also mention some info like social security number that driving licences don't. What's more an ID card can be used as a passport within certain countries (like EU countries + Switzerland + Lichtestein, Andorra, Norway...), but not driving licences.


Jeisan is right on this one. You can go to the DMV and be issued a state ID card. It looks just like the drivers license but it states on it that it is for ID purposes only. I believe (not sure) that you can get it at age 13. (I'm sure this varies by state) Most people must have this in order to cash checks, or for identification at banks for access to accounts, or for proof of age to purchase cigs/alcohol. The difference is that it is (as you said) not able to be used as a passport. The ones that I know of do have your social security number on them.

Now...here are my choices:

1) ID Cards :
a) compulsory for everybody and must be carried at alll times

2) Driving licence :

b) from 16 years old
I like what many states in the US do now. Learners permit at 15 (licensed driver in the car with you) But I also suggest that from 16-18 you must remain within 15 miles of your home. (sounds strange, but I have my reasons)

3) Blood group card
c) optional (only those who ask for one get one)
Don't really see a need for this one, as it is only your own life at stake!

4) Medical Services
a) medical services 100% paid by the State (through taxes)
or
b) mostly reimbursed by the State

5) Dual nationality
a) allowed


6) Military service (conscription/draft)
a) compulsory for men and women
compulsory, but like Jeisan time could be served in many ways...ie city/state/fed gov't civil service, nat'l guard, assisting elderly. (but Maciamo has a valid point too)

7) Legal drinking age :
d) 16-17
I can't see allowing children under this age to be drinking.

8) Education :
b) only public schools/universities should be free

Elizabeth
27-11-04, 18:32
1) ID Cards :
d) no ID cards for anyone

2) Driving licence :
b) from 16 years old

3) Blood group card
c) optional (only those who ask for one get one)

4) Medical Services
b) mostly reimbursed by the State (for those not already privately insured or in cases of picking up what private insurance cannot cover)

5) Dual nationality
a) allowed
(In countries where citizenship is a birthright for everyone, the parents' nationality should also be recognized until a certain age when that child would have to choose one of the two or three). If dual nationality is rarely or never allowed anywhere, and it is dependent on the parents' nationality(ies), in some countries but not others, there ends up being too many people without any nationality (such as in Japan).

6) Military service (conscription/draft)
d) voluntary (although not profesional career in army, but just 1-year or so)
(as a supplement to the career military, which is what we have in the US already).

7) Legal drinking age :
e) 18-19

8) Education :
b) only public schools/universities should be partly subsidized by the State
(There would be too much interferance by the govt. in setting standards, curricula etc if everything were fully subsidized).

Maciamo
28-11-04, 04:10
8) Education :
b) only public schools/universities should be partly subsidized by the State
(There would be too much interferance by the govt. in setting standards, curricula etc if everything were fully subsidized).

Actually not. In most EU coutries, the government pays the salary of all school teachers and university professors, and only a small percentage (maybe 10%) of schools are public. However, all private schools are free to decide their own curriculum and there is a lot of competition between them based on how effective or popular the curriculum, teachers and directors' reputation, scholl location and facilities, etc. And there are lot's of differences between schools. Some still have very traditional curriculum, with almost no option and subjects like Latin, Greek and Maths. But others allowed students to choose options from the 1st year (of secondary school), especially regarding the choice of modern languages, the numbe rof hours of sciences and maths, but also completely optional subjects like psychology, economy, graphic arts, music, etc.


Jeisan is right on this one. You can go to the DMV and be issued a state ID card. It looks just like the drivers license but it states on it that it is for ID purposes only. I believe (not sure) that you can get it at age 13. (I'm sure this varies by state) Most people must have this in order to cash checks, or for identification at banks for access to accounts, or for proof of age to purchase cigs/alcohol. The difference is that it is (as you said) not able to be used as a passport. The ones that I know of do have your social security number on them.

Thanks for the explanation. Do all states have this system ?


7) Legal drinking age :
d) 16-17
I can't see allowing children under this age to be drinking.

In Belgium, there was no minimum legal age until recently (now it's 14 or 15 I think, although not enforced). I would have been bothered by a government enforcing strict age control, as I took wine tasting classes at the age of 11. I was the only child, but it didin't seem to bother anybody, not even my parents who thought it was a good idea to be interested in oenology at such a young age. We tried about 7 different wines in the evening (in small quantities, but yet, enough to get tipsy at only 11).

I personally didn't like much go to the pub and drink beer (I dislike beer), but after the mid-term or year-end exam, all secondary school students (from the age of 13) went to town and celebrated the end of the exams by drinking all day (and you know that Belgian beer is famous, and quite cheap in the country where it's made - about 50 cent/glass).

These kinds of parties would not have been possible, but neither could we have had "dancing parties" at the weekend or going to the nightclubs from 16 years old if alcohol had been prohibited until 18 or 21. 16 to 20 years old between the time when people party the most (at least where I come from), I wonder how American or Japanese youths party without alcohol. It sounds very puritan to me, although I am only a moderate and occasional drinker (I have never been drunk enough not to remember something).

I think that staring drinking at a relatively early age helps people control the amount of alcohol they consume better, because young teenagers are less resistant to alcohol and will not go to the same excess as 21 years-old's who have never drunk before.

jeisan
28-11-04, 04:30
Driving licences are not ID cards. You need to pass a driving test to get it. Real ID cards are available to everybody, and in countries where it exist also for children (eg, in Belgium compulsory from 12 years old, but optional children ID exist before that). ID cards also mention some info like social security number that driving licences don't. What's more an ID card can be used as a passport within certain countries (like EU countries + Switzerland + Lichtestein, Andorra, Norway...), but not driving licences.

A driver license is no longer used solely as a document demonstrating authorization to drive. The driver license or identification certificates are the nationally accepted form of identification and both are used daily to establish identity at airports, banks, when writing checks, voting, or applying for governmental aid.
http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/administration/driver_licensing_control/identificationrequirements.htm

in the states a drivers lisence is considered a government issued ID card. your social security number, weight, thumbprints and a couple other things, while not on the card, are contained in a database which can be accessed by the drivers lisence number, the barcode or the magnetic strip on the back for agencies with the capabilities to read it, the police for example. while regular ID cards are available to anyone, they are also issued by the department of motor vehicles. why? it probably just saves time since the DMV is already making them anyway. they look almost the same except one says "drivers license" and the other says "(non-driver) identification card."




The only country I know where military service is compulsory for both men and women is Israel.

What's the point of forcing everyone to join the army for 2 years to get free education and healthcare if it's already free (like in the UK). Then I feel that compulsory military service is forcing people to waste 1 or 2 years of their life. I personally would rather change nationality than be forced to join the army or a civil service or forcing me to do anything else I don't want to for a long period of time. School was the worse so far, a complete waste of time for I don't think I have learnt anything that I could not have learnt by myself in a quarter of the time and a more enjoyable manner. University is different as at least we can choose to attend or not and choose the subject(s).
yeah well i think that if men have to do it so do women, all things being equal. also its not like a forced draft type thing, more like the national guard here, 1 weekend a month or something train and if the need comes up for you to defend the country then you should, its doing so much for you a person could at least give a little back.

Maciamo
28-11-04, 06:15
in the states a drivers lisence is considered a government issued ID card. your social security number, weight, thumbprints and a couple other things, while not on the card, are contained in a database which can be accessed by the drivers lisence number, the barcode or the magnetic strip on the back for agencies with the capabilities to read it, the police for example. while regular ID cards are available to anyone, they are also issued by the department of motor vehicles.

In Europe, neither ID cards nor driving licences have the weights (as it changes, sometimes fast), nor the thumbprints. Actually, there isn't even the address as some people change too often (and in some countries, both ID cards and drving licences have no limit of validity, so you can keep them for life).


also its not like a forced draft type thing, more like the national guard here, 1 weekend a month or something train and if the need comes up for you to defend the country then you should, its doing so much for you a person could at least give a little back.

When I said "military service" I was referring to the real thing, that is full-time service (being allowed to go back home on Sundays, sometimes only once or twice a month), sleeping in barracks, peeling potatoes, rock-climbing, parachuting (if in para-commando section), walking 80km a day with a heavy backpack, and all the stuff. This is what normal citizen are forced to do in the European countries where military service is compulsory. Rare are the people who enjoy it. Actually, doing "one's time" is hardly more fun than going to war or a prisoner camp. Some people also die during military service. But in countries like France, those who don't do their time (one year usually) risk a jail sentence and lose the voting rights, etc. I find it completely inhuman and wonder how such a system still exist in developed countries in the 21st century.

Lina Inverse
28-11-04, 06:26
If you were an influencial politician and had enough power to change (or leave) a few of these things in your country or your ideal country, what would you do ?

1) ID Cards :
a) compulsory for everybody and must be carried at alll times
b) compulsory for everybody but doesn't have to be carried all the time
c) optional (only those who want one can get one)
d) no ID cards for everybody

I'd say they're neccessary, but people shouldn't be forced to carry them all times

2) Driving licence :
a) from under 16 years old
b) from 16 years old
c) from 17 years old
d) from 18 years old
e) from over 18 years old

Earlier than 18 years is bad, they're much more unattentive and prone to accidents if too young

3) Blood group card
a) compulsory for everybody and should be carried at alll times in case of accident
b) tests compulsory for everybody to be sure to know one's blood group
c) optional (only those who ask for one get one)

There's absolutely no need to force people to have blood tests

4) Medical Services
a) medical services 100% paid by the State (through taxes)
b) mostly reimbursed by the State
c) only miniminally reimbursed by the State
d) not subsidized at all (full cost for those who do not have a private health insurance)

Should always be free so anyone can afford it

5) Dual nationality
a) allowed
b) allowed for some special cases only (children born of parents of different nationalities, etc.)
c) never or very rarely allowed

No good reason to disallow it

6) Military service (conscription/draft)
a) compulsory for men and women
b) compulsory for men
c) compulsory for men except university student, objection of conscience, civil service, homosexuality, exemption payment, or other reason.
d) voluntary - for men and women alike. If they want, they can also have a professional carrier in the army.
e) no military service apart from professional army

Men and women alike should be enabled to go to the army. Having a voluntary service will get much higher motivation since they're there because they want to, not because they're forced to.

7) Legal drinking age :
a) no minimum
b) 12 or under
c) 13-15
d) 16-17
e) 18-19
f) 20 or over

16 for beer and other low-alcohol stuff, 18 for stronger stuff

8) Education :
a) should be completely free for both private and public schools/universities (teachers paid by the State)
b) only public schools/universities should be free
c) all schools/universities should be only partly subsidized by the State
d) no schools/universities should be subsidized at all

Education should be free so everyone can afford it

Bob in Iowa
28-11-04, 07:08
My two cents worth:

1) ID Cards :
a) compulsory for everybody and must be carried at alll times
b) compulsory for everybody but doesn't have to be carried all the time
c) optional (only those who want one can get one)
d) no ID cards for everybody

Here in the US, most states (if not all) will issue and ID card to those who request it. Personally, I do not like the idea of compulsory ID, and would certainly reject the notion of a law requiring it to be carried at all times.


2) Driving licence :
a) from under 16 years old
b) from 16 years old
c) from 17 years old
d) from 18 years old
e) from over 18 years old

Generally in the 16 to 17 year old range, but I think that this issue is best regulated by the states and municipalities, as it is currently.

3) Blood group card
a) compulsory for everybody and should be carried at alll times in case of accident
b) tests compulsory for everybody to be sure to know one's blood group
c) optional (only those who ask for one get one)

4) Medical Services
a) medical services 100% paid by the State (through taxes)
b) mostly reimbursed by the State
c) only miniminally reimbursed by the State
d) not subsidized at all (full cost for those who do not have a private health insurance)

This is a case of 'be careful what you wish for'. Certainly, in the US, we do have a problem with so many people lacking health care insurance, and I do think that some of the tax dollars that we contribute should go toward providing health insurance to all citizens and residents, but my fear in this is the high probability of government mismanagement.

5) Dual nationality
a) allowed
b) allowed for some special cases only (children born of parents of different nationalities, etc.) c) never or very rarely allowed


6) Military service (conscription/draft)
a) compulsory for men and women
b) compulsory for men
c) compulsory for men except university student, objection of conscience, civil service, homosexuality, exemption payment, or other reason.
d) voluntary (although not profesional career in army, but just 1-year or so)
e) no military service apart from professional army

In times of peace, a voluntary professional military should suffice. In time of war, I favor compulsory military service for men and women, with the offspring of the president, vice president, cabinet members, senators, and congressmen being drafted first. Let the lawmakers put some skin in the game before deciding to make war.


7) Legal drinking age :
a) no minimum
b) 12 or under
c) 13-15
d) 16-17
e) 18-19
f) 20 or over



8) Education :
a) should be completely free for both private and public schools/universities (teachers paid by the State)
b) only public schools/universities should be free
c) all schools/universities should be only partly subsidized by the State
d) no schools/universities should be subsidized

mad pierrot
28-11-04, 13:04
1) ID Cards :
d) no ID cards for everybody

2) Driving licence :
d) from 18 years old

3) Blood group card
c) optional (only those who ask for one get one)

4) Medical Services
a) medical services 100% paid by the State (through taxes)

5) Dual nationality
a) allowed

6) Military service (conscription/draft))
e) no military service apart from professional army

7) Legal drinking age :
a) no minimum

8) Education :
b) only public schools/universities should be free

CC1
28-11-04, 13:19
for those of you who picked no ID card, and free medical for everyone...how do you verify that the people requesting health care actually are citizens and deserve care? Are you saying that anyone that sets foot in your country (ie a vacationing citizen of another country) should receive free health care?

mad pierrot
28-11-04, 16:00
You don't need to have a card to have an ID, do you? But, after thinking it through, I concede to your point: having a ID card does make things easier! When I read the option I'll admitt I was only thinking of the negative. That being said, I'm still incredibly weary of it. Maybe I'm just afraid one day we'll all have bar codes on the back of our necks.

Maciamo
28-11-04, 17:05
for those of you who picked no ID card, and free medical for everyone...how do you verify that the people requesting health care actually are citizens and deserve care? Are you saying that anyone that sets foot in your country (ie a vacationing citizen of another country) should receive free health care?

Well, they could have a "national health insurance card". In Europe these cards are electronic and have all the necessary medical information (blood group, allergies, vaccination record, insurance info, etc.) and can only be read by special machines in hospitals or doctor's offices so as to assure privacy. They will soon be (or already are ?) the same for all the EU, so that any EU citizen can receive medical care anywhere in Europe and be reimbursed by their respective national insurance. However, they cannot be used as ID cards as there is no picture not anything else but the holder's name and insurance number on it (outside).

Miss_apollo7
29-11-04, 13:55
Well, they could have a "national health insurance card". In Europe these cards are electronic and have all the necessary medical information (blood group, allergies, vaccination record, insurance info, etc.) and can only be read by special machines in hospitals or doctor's offices so as to assure privacy. They will soon be (or already are ?) the same for all the EU, so that any EU citizen can receive medical care anywhere in Europe and be reimbursed by their respective national insurance. However, they cannot be used as ID cards as there is no picture not anything else but the holder's name and insurance number on it (outside).

That is true. And it works. The card I have just looks like a normal credit card with my name, personal id number, address, name of doctor etc...When I moved to England, I just got myself UK's NH-card (and the Danish one), and got medical attention for free being a EU-citizen...

Bob in Iowa
29-11-04, 14:02
That is true. And it works. The card I have just looks like a normal credit card with my name, personal id number, address, name of doctor etc...When I moved to England, I just got myself UK's NH-card (and the Danish one), and got medical attention for free being a EU-citizen...

The more I learn about the EU healthcare system, the better it sounds. Do you ever experience denial or limitation of care based upon system limitations, ie, perception of medical necessity, choice of physician, etc?

Miss_apollo7
29-11-04, 19:47
The more I learn about the EU healthcare system, the better it sounds. Do you ever experience denial or limitation of care based upon system limitations, ie, perception of medical necessity, choice of physician, etc?

NOPE, this I have never experienced, well I only saw the doctor once as I am hardly sick. :-)
I have the same rights as any EU-citizen (this is the law). Freedom of movement and work and study in any EU-country with the same rights as the citizen in that particular EU-country.
This applies to labour law, tuition fees, right to choose doctor etc....basically: everything.

MWThomas
30-11-04, 11:04
1) ID Cards :
a) compulsory for everybody and must be carried at alll times
b) compulsory for everybody but doesn't have to be carried all the time
c) optional (only those who want one can get one)
d) no ID cards for everybody

2) Driving licence :
a) from under 16 years old
b) from 16 years old
c) from 17 years old
d) from 18 years old
e) from over 18 years old

3) Blood group card
a) compulsory for everybody and should be carried at alll times in case of accident
b) tests compulsory for everybody to be sure to know one's blood group
c) optional (only those who ask for one get one)

4) Medical Services
a) medical services 100% paid by the State (through taxes)
b) mostly reimbursed by the State
c) only miniminally reimbursed by the State
d) not subsidized at all (full cost for those who do not have a private health insurance)

5) Dual nationality
a) allowed
b) allowed for some special cases only (children born of parents of different nationalities, etc.)
c) never or very rarely allowed

6) Military service (conscription/draft)
a) compulsory for men and women
b) compulsory for men
c) compulsory for men except university student, objection of conscience, civil service, homosexuality, exemption payment, or other reason.
d) voluntary (although not profesional career in army, but just 1-year or so)
e) no military service apart from professional army

7) Legal drinking age :
a) no minimum
b) 12 or under
c) 13-15
d) 16-17
e) 18-19
f) 20 or over

8) Education :
a) should be completely free for both private and public schools/universities (teachers paid by the State)
b) only public schools/universities should be free
c) all schools/universities should be only partly subsidized by the State
d) no schools/universities should be subsidized at all