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Mycernius
26-04-05, 19:07
I am starting to get pretty fed up about various phrases people utter. I have just heard an interview with Jennifer Lopez and every other sentance was 'y'know what I mean' and after a while it becomes annoying. Another one that is bugging me is 'at the end of the day'. I work with a man that uses this all the time, well until I threatened to hit him every time he used it. What is it with these silly, trivial little phrases. Britney Spears is all 'y'know, y'know'. STOP IT, YOU ANNOYING LITTLE WOMAN!. I think their right to use the language should be revoked until they can prove they can use English at a responsible level. Does anyone on this forum have their own little pet hates about phrases in English, or any other language for that matter. Are there any Japnaese ones for example?

MeAndroo
26-04-05, 19:55
As far as Japanese, I got sick and tired of hearing "maji de?" from kids walking and talking on their cell phones. The same goes for people who liberally sprinkle their sentences with "sa."

Ikyoto
26-04-05, 20:54
"like"... Like it gets like used to like DEATH Yaknow what I mean?

Seriously I've told my children that unless they can speak without "filler" then they shouldn't say anything. Those phrases are used to fill in gaps in thought and unless you know what you are going to say, say nothing and THINK!

misa.j
27-04-05, 01:00
"mitaina~." means exactly "like" in Japanese, and the way that's used is exactly same as how "like" is used; vague little phrase.

Ikyoto
30-04-05, 15:45
みたいな I know みたいな what you みたいな mean!

Every time my kids do something like this I repete EXECTLY what they say and say the annoying word LOUDLY enough so they can't help but notice what they are doing.

Brooker
30-04-05, 22:06
Yeah, I find, "You know what I'm sayin'?" very annoying. I want to respond, "NO! What you're saying is so deep that I couldn't possibly comprehend it! Baka!" :p

Dutch Baka
30-04-05, 22:21
i get crazy of the sentence:

OWWWWW MY GOD!!!!!!

man.. i freaking dislike that more then well.. i dont know hahaha...
just its really anoying!!!!!!

Ikyoto
30-04-05, 23:22
How about "Like, oh - my GOD! You know waht I mean???"

Yes, I know what you mean. You mean you can't pull more than one original sentence out of your empy little head more than once a week and I seem to have missed it.

And don't be afraid of telling people things like that. My students (I now teach computers for a job skills in a school for adults) actually apreachiate when i demand that they speak clearly and improve their vocabulary. It makes it easier for them to ge a job.

Sensuikan San
02-05-05, 03:29
Hi folks... back again...

I have been away from the U.K. for many years, and accept that things will,and have, changed ... but.... I cannot stand that horrible term "Gobsmacked" .... !

How it ever came into general use in the U.K. mystifies me - but totally justifies my not being there any more !

Sniff !

Regards,

ジョン

Mike Cash
02-05-05, 10:51
再発防止 ticks me off

deadhippo
02-05-05, 10:53
i hate "get out of my face ...ratboy"

Ikyoto
02-05-05, 13:52
and the ever popular "What EVER" with the snotty tone and rolled eyes. That one will get a smack to the back of the head when it comes out of my kids. It's ruder than ME!

Glenn
02-05-05, 19:30
再発防止 ticks me off

"Recurring prevention?" Does that mean that you're continually trying to prevent something?

pinkkillerkisou
02-05-05, 23:17
"Fo' shizzle my nizzle" (and the other 9723486236578265 expressions derived from it)

It could very well be the meaning of life... but I honestly have no clue why is exists. Isn't it better to say "I concur with you wholeheartedly my African American brother" :emblaugh:

majime_na_yuki
03-05-05, 01:39
"Fo' shizzle my nizzle" (and the other 9723486236578265 expressions derived from it)

It could very well be the meaning of life... but I honestly have no clue why is exists. Isn't it better to say "I concur with you wholeheartedly my African American brother" :emblaugh:
:lol: Ah, that's great. You just made my day.

Oh, there are so many phrases which annoy me, both in Japanese and English.
English: 'Fo shizzle,' of course;'that's so gay'(still used ad nauseam at my school; using it even once is ad nauseam);'you know'; 'in terms of that'; and a few others that I can't remember right now, thankfully.

In Japanese, my main pet peeve: 'maji de.'

Mike Cash
03-05-05, 02:24
"Recurring prevention?" Does that mean that you're continually trying to prevent something?

You're close. It means to prevent a recurrance. It's a phrase you're guaranteed to hear from the people responsible for supervising whomever/whatever caused a major foulup like the recent derailment.

I hate hearing it because it reminds me of how the Japanese merely pay lip service to safety. I could go into a full-scale, long-winded rant over this, but I don't feel like getting my blood pressure up at the moment.

Mycernius
03-05-05, 18:39
Another one that bugs me is 'innit'. What is worse my mother uses it :okashii: . I just tell her she is not a member of some Indian London massive.

Glenn
04-05-05, 01:09
You're close. It means to prevent a recurrance. It's a phrase you're guaranteed to hear from the people responsible for supervising whomever/whatever caused a major foulup like the recent derailment.

Ah, so it's "recurrance prevention." Wow, that ending makes a big difference. :D


I hate hearing it because it reminds me of how the Japanese merely pay lip service to safety. I could go into a full-scale, long-winded rant over this, but I don't feel like getting my blood pressure up at the moment.

I think the same is done in the US. Well, maybe it's not lip service so much as it's a "we're going to pass some laws that make us look like we care but we didn't really affect any change" type of thing that we get from our politicians.

Miss_apollo7
04-05-05, 15:31
What ticks me off is: "you know what I mean?".....

pinkkillerkisou
04-05-05, 23:42
Haha... I noticed this once. So sad the English language is deteriorating and we are de-evolving and turning back into grunting baboons :lol:

son: *walks in kitchen* ehhh! (apparently this is how children greet their mothers :D)
mother: *nods understanding his 'hello'* Ja-eat? (Did you eat?)
son: Joo? (Did you?)

...and they understand each other perfectly.

Mike Cash
05-05-05, 05:32
Why shouldn't they understand each other perfectly? (It's the way people talk where I'm from, by the way).

The same phenomenon can be seen in Japanese, and probably in other languages as well.

For example:

English: ....t + y..... > ...ch...
English: ...d + y..... > ...j...

Japanese: て+は>ちゃ
Japanese: で+は>じゃ

pinkkillerkisou
05-05-05, 22:31
Well for them it is easy. Think from the other perspective. Think of the people trying to learn other languages and talking to native speakers and hearing these abbreviated phrases and lazy grunts and mumbles. How can one understand and learn?

SirJeannot
05-05-05, 23:51
we've got the same for the poor french speakers. it's become quite common for many to add "quoi" every 2/3 words (imagine a regular sentence with 3 "what" inside). very very very annoying :okashii:

Mike Cash
06-05-05, 12:09
Well for them it is easy. Think from the other perspective. Think of the people trying to learn other languages and talking to native speakers and hearing these abbreviated phrases and lazy grunts and mumbles. How can one understand and learn?

I don't have to think from the other perspective....I've been living the other perspective since before you drew your first breath.

One of my favorites that happened to me personally was meeting a coworker one morning and being greeted with ”マイク、おはよう。ねえんべ?”

It took me several seconds to decode it and be able to answer him.

lexico
07-05-05, 12:42
English: ....t + y..... > ...ch...
English: ...d + y..... > ...j...

Japanese: て+は>ちゃ
Japanese: で+は>じゃWhich makes me wonder, are there any languages that don't do this in the spoken form, i.e. keep the t's and d's unchanged before an i ? (serious question)

I was told by my high school English teacher, "English doesn't palatalize its t's and d's." How surprised I was to hear,

"Djyui djet ?" for "Did you eat yet ?" :lol:

Prizm
08-05-05, 10:51
I always try to be concious of what phrases I say and the frequency I use them. Typical teenage talk does bug me (like, umm..., kinda) when they use it a lot. I read one 17-year-old girls' email to a company (it was a request from the company or something, don't quite remember) - and it was absolutely shocking. Filled with 'unsure-ities' like "kinda", "like", etc. When I read it, I'm thinking there ain't no way she's getting a response. The only thing missing down the bottom of the email was kthxbye!!!1111
If I got the email, I'd bin it straight away.

My real annoyance at the moment is when someone says "isn't it?" in incorrect grammar. Example:
"You're going to the shop, isn't it?" Wrong. The correct grammar is:
"You're going to the shop, aren't you?"

Indians and Burmese seem to do this a lot. A few australian women do it too.

Prizm