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Maciamo
27-04-05, 15:41
The new Airbus A380 has just completed its maiden flight over the Bay of Biscay. The world's largest airplane is also the first full double-decker and will accommodate up to 840 passengers (if economy class only). Singapore Airlines will be the first to acquire the giant, and intend to start commercial flights from 2006. Emirates and Qantas will be the next in line.

The aircraft was designed and manufactured in the UK, France, Germany and Spain.

Airbus A380 completes test flight (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/4488361.stm)

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40728000/gif/_40728825_airbus_a380416.gif

CC1
27-04-05, 16:02
Two questions:

1. Wasn't this the aircraft that was said to be too big to land at most International terminals?

2. Why do you need a plane so large?

Maciamo
27-04-05, 16:13
1. Wasn't this the aircraft that was said to be too big to land at most International terminals?

Yes, so it will only fly between major cities around the world, mostly long distances (but the Japanese will surely use it between Tokyo and Osaka). Anyway, small airports usually get smaller aircrafts, because less passengers come there at a time (otherwise the airport would be bigger). The A380 will first be used by Singapore airlines for the flights between Europe and Australia via Singapore, and Singapore to San Francisco via Hong Kong.



2. Why do you need a plane so large?

It makes the tickets much cheaper. The airplane itself will only cost about 20% more than Boeing new 787 Dreamliner, and take twice more passengers. Make the count.

CC1
27-04-05, 16:36
Yes, so it will only fly between major cities around the world, mostly long distances (but the Japanese will surely use it between Tokyo and Osaka). Anyway, small airports usually get smaller aircrafts, because less passengers come there at a time (otherwise the airport would be bigger). The A380 will first be used by Singapore airlines for the flights between Europe and Australia via Singapore, and Singapore to San Francisco via Hong Kong.

But if I remember correctly, it was too large for airports such as LAX, ATL, and O'hare...so many flights to the US would be impossible. But as you say, it would be able to be used elsewhere I guess.




It makes the tickets much cheaper. The airplane itself will only cost about 20% more than Boeing new 787 Dreamliner, and take twice more passengers. Make the count.

But the problem with many airlines is that many flights are not full as it is...thus trying to fill seats in an even larger aircraft would be more difficult unless you offer less flights meaning more inconvenience to the traveler!

I will say that I am impressed with the shear size of the craft, but disappointed in the environmental impact of such a beast!

Maciamo
27-04-05, 16:46
But if I remember correctly, it was too large for airports such as LAX, ATL, and O'hare...so many flights to the US would be impossible. But as you say, it would be able to be used elsewhere I guess.

These airports are already planning to adapt their runways.


But the problem with many airlines is that many flights are not full as it is...thus trying to fill seats in an even larger aircraft would be more difficult unless you offer less flights meaning more inconvenience to the traveler!

Some routes are always very busy (eg. London-New York, Tokyo-Osaka...), and bigger airplanes will lower the prices for all these people. In fact, almost every time I fly from Tokyo to London or Paris, the plan is full or nearly full. Add to this chartered flights for holiday packages.


I will say that I am impressed with the shear size of the craft, but disappointed in the environmental impact of such a beast!

I am not sure that 2 or 3 smaller planes carrying the same total of passengers pollute less.

acquiredtarget
27-04-05, 18:14
I agree, these behemoths are perfect for long-haul flights, but I think the airlines will see most of their revenue coming from the mid and short-haul flights. I think we'll see more smaller planes being sold for passenger flights and the A380's used more as cargo carriers than passenger carriers. But, I could be wrong.

Duo
27-04-05, 20:45
The new A380 is an environment friendly aircraft. First off, it pullotes less, including noise pollution seeing as the airbus people worked hard to achieve this, especially rolls royce, the maker of the engines, concerning the noise pollution. It will be a very useful aircraft for long distance routes such as london - sydney etc with no need to stop. Also, this consolidates European cooperation showeing that together Europe can make great things. I guess that there is a small political undertone as well. In the next 20-30 years, this aircraft will become extremely important to the travel business, seeing as its size allows also for leizures during the flight, such as a bar, and other things. Like Chirac said, its the airship of the skies ;)

CC1
28-04-05, 02:23
The new A380 is an environment friendly aircraft. First off, it pullotes less, including noise pollution seeing as the airbus people worked hard to achieve this, especially rolls royce, the maker of the engines, concerning the noise pollution. It will be a very useful aircraft for long distance routes such as london - sydney etc with no need to stop. Also, this consolidates European cooperation showeing that together Europe can make great things. I guess that there is a small political undertone as well. In the next 20-30 years, this aircraft will become extremely important to the travel business, seeing as its size allows also for leizures during the flight, such as a bar, and other things. Like Chirac said, its the airship of the skies ;)

Maybe noise friendly, but I really don't buy that it is environmentally friendly.

Also it is not economical. The numbers that were supplied supports a fully loaded aircraft carrying a maximum payload of passengers. Most experts agree that the companies buying the aircraft will not use this configuration, thus the fuel efficiency drops below what current aircraft have.

Many articles I have read suggest that the extra space will be used to make 1st class even more luxurious...and maybe even supplying ammenities such as gyms, spas, bedrooms, etc...

bossel
28-04-05, 07:13
Maybe noise friendly, but I really don't buy that it is environmentally friendly.
Well, it is. It's the 1st commercial airliner with a kerosene consumption of less than 3l per passenger/100km.


The numbers that were supplied supports a fully loaded aircraft carrying a maximum payload of passengers. Most experts agree that the companies buying the aircraft will not use this configuration,
That's true for all aircraft.


Many articles I have read suggest that the extra space will be used to make 1st class even more luxurious...and maybe even supplying ammenities such as gyms, spas, bedrooms, etc...
That depends on what the airlines order.

Index
28-04-05, 07:29
Good for terrorists-more targets in one hit :clap: . Apparently Al Qaeda made large investments into it's development. :gun: