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View Full Version : book suggestions on Korean war crimes/atrocities, please



lexico
01-09-05, 09:45
The topic of Japanese war crimes were raised and is being discussed. I understand that it does not sound friendly, but it lies in the past. I would like to know, in all fairness, and also out of genuine interest, of any books, articles or links regarding Korean war crimes/atrocities. Some of those may be related to Japan, but not necessarily. Any help or comments will be appreciated. Thanks.

Pre WWI

WWI & II

1945-present

Kara_Nari
01-09-05, 15:24
In the english section of most of the Korean bookshops they have short stories, some of them are auto biographies of people associated with war, comfort women, the children of army generals etc. Next time I see them I will take down the names. They are just small books less than A5 size. Interesting reads. Then there are other stories too. But if you want the goriest stories I dont know. However im sure that you would be able to shed some light on at least 10 books related to this topic... please state which ones you found the most interesting. I would like to read them.

lexico
01-09-05, 15:36
Thank you for your suggestions, Kara Nari. I also found these on the forum and some areas of interest.

1) Vietnam War: Korean war crimes

2) Koje Island Prisoner Camp: mutual terror btween communists and anti-communists

3) Jeju Rebellion, 1948 (?) // Yosu-Sunchon Rebellion 1950's

4) Korean War 1950-1953

5) Occupied Hong Kong
[I] quoted some lines from this testimony book, written by a Honkong person.

『日本軍は香港で何をしたか』  謝永光 :著 森幹夫:訳

"What did the Japanese army do in Hong Kong?"

ttp://www.amazon.co.jp/exec/obidos/ASIN/4784503420/250-1235148-0423445

The author of this book experienced the Hong Kong occupation by the Japanese army.
he was a doctor of the Orient medicine (Haricuu/shinkyu/針灸).

"What did the Japanese army do in Hong Kong?"

↓QUOTE 

During Japan occupied Hong Kong,
many Korean wore the uniform of Japan army.
The Korean were taller than the Japanese,and used violence very much.
Koreans did intrude Hong Kong residents' houses , and raped women .
Hong Kong residents held heavy hate to the Korean more than Japan army.

香港占領期間中、多くの朝鮮人が日本の軍服を着てい たが、一般の日本人よりも背が高く、
日本の正規軍よりも、もっと凶暴だった。このとき民家 に乱入して婦女暴行を働いたのは、
日本人の手先となって悪事を働いていた朝鮮人で った 。
当時香港住民は日本軍に対するよりも、もっと激しい憎 悪の念を彼らに抱いた。

Kara_Nari
01-09-05, 15:47
All of this is hiding in the forum????
Thanks :D

lexico
01-09-05, 15:53
Well some of them are from my noodles; but I consider my brain part of the forum, hehe... (Matrix !! Arrrgh !!) :evil:
btw, they have to be verified; I am not even sure if all of them qualify as atrocity, but I am certain at least Vietnam War, and the supression of Jeju rebelion had genocidal crimes to speak of them in the least.

Kara_Nari
01-09-05, 16:00
Great anyway im sure all will be interesting.
I went to Seodaemun for the first time last month. Quite an intense feeling walking through there. Much more interesting than the War memorial museum in Yong san.
It sort of triggered my morbid fascination when I went to Cambodia, war crimes and the like. That place was by far the saddest place in the world to visit. S21 museum. Made me cry, and got really upset for days afterwards.
I was a bit annoyed at all the slander (in the form of graffiti) towards Japanese at Seodaemun, I realise that the museum is about the Japanese occupation etc, but some of the comments (from what I could make out) really were unnecessary. No wonder Japanese visitors cry when they visit there.

Yorkie
03-11-11, 10:11
Great anyway im sure all will be interesting.
I went to Seodaemun for the first time last month. Quite an intense feeling walking through there. Much more interesting than the War memorial museum in Yong san.
It sort of triggered my morbid fascination when I went to Cambodia, war crimes and the like. That place was by far the saddest place in the world to visit. S21 museum. Made me cry, and got really upset for days afterwards.
I was a bit annoyed at all the slander (in the form of graffiti) towards Japanese at Seodaemun, I realise that the museum is about the Japanese occupation etc, but some of the comments (from what I could make out) really were unnecessary. No wonder Japanese visitors cry when they visit there.

Modern-day Japanese who were not even born when these atrocities were committed should never be blamed for them. There is no such thing as inherited national guilt. Nevertheless, Japanese people should be told what their armed forces did in WW2 for example. There have been accusations in the past, from European and Chinese sources, to the ends that Japanese school textbooks tend to underplay or even ignore the vast scale of atrocities committed in the name of Hirohito. I would like to think that some Japanese might be upset to learn of these incidents as well as by unpleasant graffiti.