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Maciamo
18-09-05, 05:17
I have found linking Bush to the Judeo-Christian (and Rastafarian) God !

Incidentally, do you think that there is a connection between :

- Yah/Jah/Jehova : Judeo-Christian almighty god
- Iah, Egyptian lunar deity
- [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yahu]Yahu (]an interesting disambiguation page in Wikipedia[/url) (not Yahoo! :relief: ), levantine god of chaos and power (of the untamed sea)

All have their origins in the same region and in the same period...

Mars Man
27-09-05, 11:36
I couldn't get the site to pop up, but a quick check elsewhere led me to think that perhaps there may not be any real, tangible link--just maybe coincidence--between George and the others. The link between Yah, and those, to the Egyptian god may be closer althogh my Hebrew lexicon puts it roots towards an older 'mountain god'.

I'm not sure, at any rate. I'll keep my ears and eyes open.

lexico
01-10-05, 09:18
I have found linking Bush to the Judeo-Christian (and Rastafarian) God !

Incidentally, do you think that there is a connection between :

- Yah/Jah/Jehova : Judeo-Christian almighty god
- Iah, Egyptian lunar deity
- [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yahu]Yahu (]an interesting disambiguation page in Wikipedia[/url) (not Yahoo! :relief: ), levantine god of chaos and power (of the untamed sea)

All have their origins in the same region and in the same period...Damned good tpoic, Maciamo ! I hate you for getting there first ! Wiki: (disambiguation page for) Iah (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iah)
- YHWH: Tetragrammaton, Yahu, Yah, Yeh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/YHWH)
- Egyptian Iah: Chrons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chons),
In Egyptian mythology, Chons (alternately Khensu, Khons, Khonsu or Khonshu) is an ancient lunar deity, from before formal structure was given to a pantheon. His name reflects the fact that the Moon (referred to as Iah in Egyptian) travels across the night sky, for it means The Wanderer, and also had the titles Embracer, Pathfinder, and Defender, as he was thought to watch over night travelers. As the god of light in the night, Chons was invoked to protect against wild animals, increase male virility, and to aid with healing. It was said that when Chons caused the crescent moon to shine, women conceived, cattle became fertile, and all nostrils and every throat were filled with fresh air. Thoth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thoth),
In Egyptian mythology, Thoth (also spelt Thot), pronounced "tot", is the Greek name given to Djehuty (also spelt Tahuti, Tehuti, Zehuti, Techu, Tetu) - the original pronunciation of his name is disputed, and may have been approximately Tee-HOW-ti -, who was originally the deification of the moon in the Ogdoad belief system. Initially, in that system, the moon had been seen to be the eye of Hor (Horus), the sky god, which had been semi-blinded (thus darker) in a fight against Set, the other eye being the sun. However, over time it began to be considered separately, becoming a lunar deity in its own right, and was said to have been another son of Ra. As the crescent moon strongly resembles the curved beak of the ibis, this separate deity was named Djehuty (i.e. Thoth), meaning ibis.
- Yaw or Yam (god) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yahu)
Yaw or Yam is the name for the Levantine god of chaos and the power of the untamed sea as found in texts from the ancient city of Ugarit. His archenemy is Ba'al, whose name means "lord" — a euphemism for Ba'al's sacred name Hadad which only his priests could utter. In Ugaritic texts, Ba'al is also known as the king of heaven, and the first born son of El, whom ancient Greeks identified with their god Cronus. He ruled over the gods assembled on the Syrian Mount Tsephon (also Sapan and Casius) which is etymologically cognate to Aramaic Zion.I think the link between the first three words should be served some serious study, although as for the fourth, I somewhat doubt the conspiratorialist suggestion suggested. In fact if there was a serious connection, I would characterise it more as anti-YHWH rather than pro-YHWH, for YHWH is known to be jealous, not allowing the partaking in authority over creation, esp. earth.
I therefore think the IAH code name for George Bush Intercontinental Airport was adopted for either

1) Wtf with GB ? IA will suffice, Honest !
2) To make the name challenge that of YHWH so that the latter's rath could descend upon the former for blasphemous claim to authority over the world order and the sacreligious disregard for the communal spirit of all-inclusive humanity.
3) Shortened, broad phonetic transcription for "Yeah, right !"

I also happen to think that the first of (wiki disambiguation page) yahoo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yahoo), yahoos (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yahoo_%28literature%29), an ethnonym supposedly coined by Jonathan Swift for Gulliver's Travels (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulliver%27s_Travels), was chosen for the diametric contrast between what the believers of YHWH are supposed to be and what they are in reality. The support comes only from the homophonous pronunciations of Yahu and Yahoo, but do we need more in creative writing ?

nota bene: Wtf is netspeak for "What's all the fuss with..." and is not an acronym for an expression of dissing. (source: Lexico's Lexicon of Netspeak, unpublished, all rights reserved, Lexico)

nice gaijin
01-10-05, 10:25
haha what's the fuss with... that's a pretty polite way of putting it, lex ;)

lexico
01-10-05, 10:56
Well, I'd hate to waste my breath on a non-issue; I'm saving my spirit for something worthy of venting. :D
As for the YHWH sound I wonder if there is a connection between the Semitic word and the Indo-European *dios~deus~dis in Jupiter.
Wiki: Jove, Jupiter (God) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jove)
The letter J was not used by the ancient Romans; the name in Latin should therefore strictly be written with an initial I, and more commonly occurs in classical authors with a double p as Iuppiter (ancient pronunciation /'jʊp:iter/). It is an irregular noun (derived from Jovis Pater), the genitive form being Jovis (ancient orthography Iouis, pronounced /'jɒwɪs/) hence the adjectives Jovian and jovial. The name (other ancient forms of which include Diovis, Diespiter and Iovis pater) is cognate with Classical Greek Zeus patēr (ὺς ΃ή) and Sanskrit Dyaus pitar, all derived from Indo-European *Dyeus Phter "sky/god the father". The elements are also cognate with Latin diēs "day" and deus "god", and with Germanic Tyr fater (from which arises the word Tuesday, although Jupiter was equated in Anglo-Saxon times with a different god, Thor, hence Jovis diēs is represented in English as Thursday).

Other Latin gods, such as Dius Fidius and Dis or Dispiter also bore similarly cognate names. Dius Fidius was sometimes considered an aspect of Jupiter, while Dis was considered entirely separate.

Many other Italic tribes invoked their chief divinities under similar names: "Diu-" or "Iuve-".

Mars Man
20-10-05, 04:56
Yes. This reminds me of some of the old stuff I had gone through in the past, but which, like much of the past, seems to have dried up at the roots and persuasively been lulled into traveling off with the wind--just like most of the hairs on my head. Nice memories have been awakened, and once again a chunk of nice information is here for me to keep in my collection I have going now. Thanks lexico !! :cool: