PDA

View Full Version : Does what a person read have a rather noteworthy impact on them?



Average_Psycho
07-01-06, 07:58
Alright... not sure how far I will get with this... but anyways...

Depending on what a person's reading material is, will they be afftected from such material as to alter their opinion, or personality?

I myself enjoy very long, wordy, and dark novels. My favourite authors are Anne Rice and Stephen King, and I'm not sure if what I read is creating an impact on how I live my life... Does anyone else have anything they would wish to add/share/elaborate?

dirty mutt
07-01-06, 08:46
I just viited the "Prussian Blue" website. Its these two cute little blonde hair, blue eyed Aryan byatches that disgust me with how innocent they portray "White Power". Anyways I read a little from one of the books they advertise on their site, and wow. I've changed. I hate everybody, even myself! NOOOOOOOOO! not really, but the SCARY part is that when you read it objectively-----I can see how some people could make sense of it. As for DENIAL of the HOLOCAUST??!!! Thats just stupid. They were homeschooled w/ textbooks of pre civil rights think 1950's. Yea I'm looking at this pic of them now where they've got on these smiley face t-shirts, but the smileys have Hitler mustaches!

If you can read objectively you shouldn't fall into that "wow I believe all of this" thinking. Kinda like the Bible/Koran/etc. CRAP I am not turning this religious!!!!!!

IGNORANCE IS EVERYWHERE! I believe that ignorance is the most common problem with people in general.:okashii:

And Im ignorantly not going to bed and Ive been ignorantly rambling on......so.....*yawn*.......yea..........peace out nicca.

ooh 1 more thang- If a person were to read this 24/7 then I think yea its persuasive enough that it would have some kind of impact on them not only conciously- but sub-conciously as well.

Anchyyy
07-01-06, 13:19
Hmmm... When i was reading Harry Potter i sometimes wanted to be as smart as Hermione is. Infact for three months or something like that, i was studying a lot and my marks were even better then before. However, i got tired of it. :relief:

Tsuyoiko
07-01-06, 15:46
Yes, what I have read has definitely changed me. Many of my principles in life come from what I have read. I wanted something to believe in, so I read about different religions, which led me to Philosophy and History and Science, and all the books I read on those subjects, together with conversations and I had with different people, and some introspection, changed my beliefs bit by bit. I think that reading has given me the knowledge to base my opinions on facts.

Ma Cherie
07-01-06, 20:58
I would have to say that reading a number has opened my up to all sorts of ideas. A book that really made me think of how the government can control every aspect of your life was "1984". It really changed the way I thought about government. Anne Rice novels has helped me develop ideas about the supernatural. :cool: I'm a big fan of fiction literature because for reason, it makes more sense to me.

Doc
07-01-06, 21:13
I believe that the material one can read can not only have an impact on them, but can also insipire them, change them, educate them, etc with their beliefs and how they perceive the world. I should know, I've been changed a lot by books. :cool:

Doc :wave:

Sensuikan San
07-01-06, 22:35
I think the original question can be answered quite simply with one word ...

"Absolutely"!

(For better or for worse ...!)

W

nice gaijin
07-01-06, 23:50
I myself enjoy very long, wordy, and dark novels. My favourite authors are Anne Rice and Stephen King, and I'm not sure if what I read is creating an impact on how I live my life...
That might be because you are reading novels. I'm not saying that novels can't be inspirational or don't have any value, but on the whole, books by Stephen King and Anne Rice induces less thought than, say, Socrates, Voltaire, Wittgenstein or Macchiaveli. While novels can sometimes be used as allegory for a greater examination of the human condition, I look to fiction for entertainment more than enlightenment.

As for a modern book that has impacted my thinking, John Robbins's "Diet for a New America" was especially gripping and very relevant. Also interesting and very brief was John Gatto's "Dumbing us Down," which is an insider's view of the compulsory education system that may surprise you. Russel Mokhiber's "Corporate Crime and Violence" raises a lot of questions about the nature of Corporations and what they do. If you would like an take on American History, I recommend Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States," it's full of stuff you won't find in a school textbook.

PRIZMATIC
08-01-06, 06:30
:japanese: That taught that to us at school (Pushkin, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, etc.) I did not read. Only "miracle" and good memory on told by teachers allowed to avoid " the big problems " at school. But, in p~~yy years, I " up to holes " have read to books and magazines (that were accessible during " Soviet times ") devoted to a fantasy both scientific theories and hypotheses. Following "step" became reading " forbidden in the Soviet union " literatures "Zen" . In "secret" I photographed these "hand-written" texts and printed out to friends (being surprised, that in these texts such "terrible", that for their presence allow three years of prison( )). I have left school already under influence of east and western literature. But from all read then and later in me there was only that I have gathered from the Zen. It appeared the most real knowledge and influence. Later, when already were xu~ Christian, Muslim, the doctrine of the Buddha, etc., my opinion has not changed also I to practise there was seriously a Zen. And this I have made a choice for two reasons:
- From the very beginning the Zen has seemed to me very "familiar" and "close", as if I already once "knew" it...
- The Zen, met to my perception...
I think, that this "choice" has been predetermined...

Much, that influences us, but we choose from this that corresponds to our perception and conditions in which we live... If since childhood, in "kindergarten" and school, to you inspire, that the person from all people it only "Lenin", reclining in the Mausoleum to which come from all world (!) (unique " the invention of communists " concerning foreigners) only the Foresight can rescue you from This ...:japanese:

Tsuyoiko
09-01-06, 17:35
That might be because you are reading novels. I'm not saying that novels can't be inspirational or don't have any value, but on the whole, books by Stephen King and Anne Rice induces less thought than, say, Socrates, Voltaire, Wittgenstein or Macchiaveli. While novels can sometimes be used as allegory for a greater examination of the human condition, I look to fiction for entertainment more than enlightenment.In general I agree with you, but probably the books that have changed me most are novels. His Dark Materials changed a lot of my ideas about religion and morality. Crime and Punishment made me understand about determinism. The Chymical Wedding taught me a lot about relationships. I think novels are usually just entertainment, but when they change you it's a big change.

Reiku
14-01-06, 17:12
Reading can have a huge effect on you, in a number of different ways. Primarily because it exposes you things you might not have thought about otherwise.

Like anything, if you're exposed to the same kind of thing over and over for along time, it can skew your perspective on the issue--but with books there is the opportunity to be exposed to something that you never would have encountered.

Take the recent trend of making villains and monsters the hero of a story:

Before, we only ever saw a vampire or a theif or a killer as a "bad guy"--we never understood his motivations, and never considered that just because we don't like what they do, it doesn't make them bad.

Whether this "sympathy for the devil" is itself good or bad is a matter of opinion--but as a general rule I think sympathetic understanding is better then ignorant bigotry.

I find that more often than not a book doesn't "change" a person so much as it causes them to discover their own beliefs.

Ofter we accept certan things without ever thinking about them--when a book or anything else causes us to examine our "beliefs", often we find what we truly believe is quite a bit differant than what we thought.

Average_Psycho
03-02-06, 06:08
Wow, those are all fascinating responses... Lately, I've found myself more interested in non-fiction topics... though I have yet to actually find a book... I've been hideously busy with midterms and more tests and worrying about my high school for next year.

I want to read some books on Russia, or the "Soviet Union" as it was however long ago. We're studying Russia now in social studies and I'm Russian, and I'm extremely interested in it.

I'd also love some books on science.... I love science, it's one of my best subjects and I think I might try for a scientific field of some sort in University (if I'm lucky).

I guess I could be called a geek, but I do find books wonderful. Many of the girls at my school don't care for books at all, and I find that sad. They're not interested in literature at all and they're so immature it's not even funny... Dad says it's not so much that they're immature, moreso as it's I am more mature. I'm thankful to my passion for books, because I don't think I'd be as good a student as I am, or as mature as I am... If I didn't read so many books (currently readin 4), I don't think I'd be as "good" a person (or so I'm told) as I am...


Sorry for not being around much to offer more of my opinion. :sorry: Midterms are over so I should be around more often...

Tsuyoiko
03-02-06, 13:40
I'd also love some books on science.... I love science, it's one of my best subjects and I think I might try for a scientific field of some sort in University (if I'm lucky).Look for something by Paul Davies, who writes mainly on Physics - such as How to Build a Time Machine or The Fifth Miracle He is very easy to read. I also like Stephen Jay Gould (http://www.stephenjaygould.org/bibliography.html), although his style is a bit harder to get into. He wrote about all kinds of stuff, but mainly palaeontology and evolution.

I guess I could be called a geek, but I do find books wonderful.Being a geek is a good thing! A love of learning is something to be proud of.
I'm thankful to my passion for books, because I don't think I'd be as good a student as I am, or as mature as I am... If I didn't read so many booksStudies (I can't find any, you'll have to take my word for it that they exist :gomen:) have shown that reading is very important for developing intelligence.

Average_Psycho
04-02-06, 06:11
Paul Davies..... Oooh, I like physics... Very easy to read? Uhh... what reading level are his books? I actually enjoy more challenging books... :relief: But I'll surely look into his written works. :cool: Palaeontology and evolution, more of what I like XD I guess I like everything science XD

I know... people always dump on geeks for being "uncool" or whatever, and I find that very immature... Who cares about what is and what is not cool? Being smart and knowing what you're doing is cool, not skipping classes and losing your future. My science teacher told my class the other day (may have been wednesday of this week), that, in terms of talking to us individually yet not, that only I can do what I was born to do... Everyone has a specific reason for being born, and only that one person can fulfill that... You have to apply yourself however, of course. I love learning new things. It's so awesome, I love it so much.

I take your word for it. ^^ That is very interesting... Makes me even prouder of my library. But it's still very miniscule... I must have more books... I do not think there really is such thing as too much books... They help you learn, you can get a whole lot of information from books, why not embrace that?

No-name
04-02-06, 08:32
Please go out and buy Atomik Aztex by Sesshu Foster.

Average_Psycho
04-02-06, 10:25
Alright, cool. What is it about?

Tsuyoiko
04-02-06, 13:37
Paul Davies..... Oooh, I like physics... Very easy to read? Uhh... what reading level are his books? I actually enjoy more challenging books... :relief: 'Easy to read' in the sense that you don't need a Physics degree to understand them - the stuff he writes about is challenging, but he describes it in a way that's easy to understand.

Average_Psycho
04-02-06, 21:12
Ahh... alright, I will definitely check his stuff out then. ^^

No-name
04-02-06, 21:34
It is a "surreal jaunt through alternate histories." Check out this review: http://lacitybeat.com/article.php?id=3139&IssueNum=136

Tsuyoiko
05-02-06, 13:23
Sabro - I will forgive your shameless plug (j/k :p ). It looks pretty good actually. I just checked, and it is published over here - so it's on my shopping list for my next Amazon purchase! (He looks cute too - do you look alike? :blush: )

Average_Psycho
06-02-06, 08:47
It is a "surreal jaunt through alternate histories." Check out this review: http://lacitybeat.com/article.php?id=3139&IssueNum=136
Awesome! Thank you, I'm reading it now!

Reiku
06-02-06, 11:37
...Being smart and knowing what you're doing is cool, not skipping classes and losing your future...

Sorry to go off topic, but as someone who's made the same mistake, I think I should warn you about where that line of thinking leads.

I used to think the same way, I'd spend all my time studying instead of learning the basic social skills one needs to interact with others...

(That's what "coolness" is all about, after all: It's a critical tool for social positioning)

...I'd alway put my best effort into my schoolwork, even though I could've been learning ten times faster if I'd skipped class and studied on my own. And I'd chide my "cool" classmates for throwing their futures away.

Now, I'm a dirt-poor martial arts instructor with a genious IQ and an extensive knowlege of physics, biology, and psychology that only serves to illuminate for me exactly how badly I screwed myself.

Modern society doesn't work on logic, it works on a combination of basic pack-animal instincts and a stratified, ant-like social-dynamic. We're taught that education is the way to success because keeping ourselves in school keeps us out of the workforce and therefore out of competition with the older generation.

In fact, our social structure is designed so that the higher social positions become increasingly fewer in number as you go up the scale.

As such, the high paying jobs and great lives we expect to get after graduating from college are in limited supply, and only a few (usually those who slacked from their studies a bit to polish their social skills) will actually get them.

The rest of us get to flip burgers and sweep streets with the class-ditchers we looked down on.

Just a freindly warning.

Tsuyoiko
06-02-06, 14:05
I agree with Reiku that studying in school doesn't guarantee your future. I was a good student, and I'm now in a dead-end job. But, career is the least of my concerns. Studying hard at school gave me the skills I need for independent learning, and having a low-pressure job means I have the time to devote to my own pursuits. I don't have much money, but I have enough to live on, and anything else people spend money on is mainly unnecessary anyway. So my advice would be, stick at it at school, but remember that there is more to life than career.

Hyde_is_my_anti-drug
07-02-06, 16:53
It's a Nature vs. Nurture thing. I think the things we're expossed to can impact us, move us, change us but I also think there are basic personality traits that you'll have regardless of what the f**k you read. Even when in church I was still fasiniated with the macraba and all the dark, gritty, and ugly sides of humanity. That was not something that I came to love through reading but something I have always loved and found greatly interesting. Once out of the church and given the chance to read what I wanted on the matter it did deepen my interest but it didn't create it. I think books can nurture things that are already there but I don't believe that, for the most part, they make them.

Average_Psycho
26-02-06, 02:38
I know that. I know friends and family who have done very well in school, but now have very unhappy jobs. I don't enjoy socializing, but I do anyways, because I know that it will help me out in the long run. I already have many contacts that can help me with future jobs/careers.

Thank you for the warning, though I don't need it....

I never said that they would make new traits to a personality, but it makes sense that they can nurture the traits.

Kinsao
26-02-06, 15:14
As regards the studying thing, I think you just have to go with whatever suits your personality. I know it's possible to make mistakes of course - my Dad did exactly that; a really intelligent person who got no qualifications because he hardly ever went to school, and ended up in a job that he found so boring. He would warn me, as parents do, not to make the same mistake, but in the end when people get to their teen age, well, you make your own decisions and you have to live with the consequences. I was quite lucky in that I was able to have the best of both worlds, getting the grades without looking as though I was studying! :blush:

About reading... (I've been trying to do more reading lately, but not been too successful due to the old enemy, time... :( )... one of my friends had a saying that neatly summed it up for me: "Rubbish in, rubbish out". :giggle:

IMO you're bound to get influenced a bit by what you read; I suppose the exact amount depends on the condition of your own mind already. :clueless:

Average_Psycho
11-03-06, 21:19
That shouldn't be too difficult... I try to keep my options varied and the like... Mistakes are kind of inevitable, bbut you can learn from them too. My dad needed glasses since he was really young, and he didn't get them because he was too stubborn, so he didn't graduate high school with good marks, and he couldn't go to university/college... I know I need glasses, and my eyes are getting worse, so I see my optometrist every year to check up on my eyes. I think I might be getting a perscription this fall... I don't want my education to go down the drain, so I'm trying to do all that I can so that my parents' money isn't wasted. Eventhough I hate french, I try hard because it affects my average... Health and gym, I can't do much about because my teacher hates me :okashii: and My cores are doing fantastic, I'm really proud of my marks.

That's an interesting saying. :giggle: *is reminded of Bamfield*

That definitely makes sense, you will be influenced, even if only a little, and sometimes it can be more than a little.

Parker
11-03-06, 23:16
Do you mean fiction or non-fiction books? If you mean non-fiction books then alot of textbooks I've studied have had an impact on me, as too has the dictionary, which completely revolutionised the way I spelt.

Nietzsche had a rather noteworthy impact on Hitler I believe.

MrsAmberface
11-03-06, 23:50
Alright... not sure how far I will get with this... but anyways...
Depending on what a person's reading material is, will they be afftected from such material as to alter their opinion, or personality?
I myself enjoy very long, wordy, and dark novels. My favourite authors are Anne Rice and Stephen King, and I'm not sure if what I read is creating an impact on how I live my life... Does anyone else have anything they would wish to add/share/elaborate?


my mother reads anne rice has every single book and is writing one of her own i've never noticed her acting any diffrently at all haha of course my whole family is odd but i've never noticed a change in personality she's gotten nicer i mean if that counts:p

Average_Psycho
03-04-06, 05:46
Do you mean fiction or non-fiction books? If you mean non-fiction books then alot of textbooks I've studied have had an impact on me, as too has the dictionary, which completely revolutionised the way I spelt.
Nietzsche had a rather noteworthy impact on Hitler I believe.

Well, it could be both... actually. Either fiction or non-fiction... or factual based fiction... but really, it all works. I love to read... and I want to have more reading material... I can't get enough XD


my mother reads anne rice has every single book and is writing one of her own i've never noticed her acting any diffrently at all haha of course my whole family is odd but i've never noticed a change in personality she's gotten nicer i mean if that counts:p

I think that could count... it might have made an impact on her in a way that you do not notice... It could be a very subtle impact, and maybe she might not even be showing it through body language or speech... But that's just my opinion... that she might be hiding it... for some reason...

Thor
03-04-06, 06:39
I'm a moody, and anguished teenager yet I read books like The Grean Hills of Eath by Heinlein, The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger, A Clockwork Orange by Burgess, Notes from the Underground and the Double by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden. I read books on world mythology, fan fictions based off of Star Wars, Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, Dozens of manga, and so forht. My taste in books isn't really set in one path. You may pick up ideas from books that could alter your personality but nothing huge.

No-name
03-04-06, 07:32
At your age, I really like Mishima Yukio's Sun and Steel. Anything by Musashi is also good or Funakoshi Gichin's Biography. Tanizaki Junichiro's Some prefer Nettles was good too. Ursula Leguin's The Disposessed or Lathe of Heaven was good. My boys enjoyed the Dune series as did my wife. My mother recommends John LeCarre.

Tsuyoiko
03-04-06, 15:31
I just finished a beautiful book called Galileo's Daughter by Dava Sobel. It is a biography of both Galileo and his elder daughter, who was a nun. As well as giving some details on Galileo's trial and imprisonment that were enlightening, it showed what a wonderful relationship these two had, told mostly through Suor Maria Celeste's letters to her father. I could relate to it as I am very close to my own dad. I can still feel tears welling up in my eyes just thinking about how Galileo must have felt when she died suddenly at the age of only 33. :(

Average_Psycho
27-04-06, 09:40
First of all, I'm sorry I haven't been on very much at all lately, I've been rather irritated with Jref (mostly cause of how over-run the Jpop forums have become) and have been very busy with school and other school-related issues.


I'm a moody, and anguished teenager yet I read books like The Grean Hills of Eath by Heinlein, The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger, A Clockwork Orange by Burgess, Notes from the Underground and the Double by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden. I read books on world mythology, fan fictions based off of Star Wars, Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, Dozens of manga, and so forht. My taste in books isn't really set in one path. You may pick up ideas from books that could alter your personality but nothing huge.

Wow... that's quite a list... *writes everything down on a piece of paper to go book-hunting for later* I actually read manga, fanfictions and books other than those written by Anne Rice and Stephen King. I've actually read To Kill A Mocking Bird by _______ some time last year, and some fictional books on young-ish Chinese girls, and some other random things. Of course, I've read a bit of LOTR and Harry Potter and a few autogiographical works as well. So my reading selection isn't as 'closed' as I may have made it seem earlier.


At your age, I really like Mishima Yukio's Sun and Steel. Anything by Musashi is also good or Funakoshi Gichin's Biography. Tanizaki Junichiro's Some prefer Nettles was good too. Ursula Leguin's The Disposessed or Lathe of Heaven was good. My boys enjoyed the Dune series as did my wife. My mother recommends John LeCarre.

Thank you for those authors and titles, I shall look into all of these books as soon as I can. Which isn't soon enough for me. *is a very avid reader*


I just finished a beautiful book called Galileo's Daughter by Dava Sobel. It is a biography of both Galileo and his elder daughter, who was a nun. As well as giving some details on Galileo's trial and imprisonment that were enlightening, it showed what a wonderful relationship these two had, told mostly through Suor Maria Celeste's letters to her father. I could relate to it as I am very close to my own dad. I can still feel tears welling up in my eyes just thinking about how Galileo must have felt when she died suddenly at the age of only 33.

I must admit, I am not very close with my father, but I have suspected some reasons as to why this is. Anyways... that's amazing that a book can have that much of an effect on you. I'm not saying of course, that books can't, because I know for a fact that they do, it's just that it has not happened to me often and I don't know of anyone else who has been so emotionally 'moved' by what they had read.

Carlson
27-04-06, 10:00
learning new things is the key to life. and if you learn well by reading lots then i guess it would be. I myself dont read alot...