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Maciamo
19-01-06, 09:59
Temperatures have fallen to -30'C (-22'F) in Moscow and nearly -60'C (-76'F) in Siberia, for the first time since 1902. Cold weather has already claimed 100 lives in Russia this winter.

Anton, Bear's den
27-05-11, 00:09
Personally for me the minus 30 degrees of Celsius is a border line with tolerant and intolerant. When frost more than minus 30 becomes difficult to breathe. Although for Siberians it's ok, probably because the frost in Siberia is "dry", not wet like in European part of Russia.

Valmir
27-05-11, 00:40
I wonder how Russians live with -30c? In Balcan when the temps are -10c or -15c(Which almost never happens) the schools stop.

Reinaert
27-05-11, 14:19
As Anton said, temperature measured with a thermometer isn't the only story.

What is also is important is moisture and wind.

This 3 parameters are translated into the "chill factor".

In The Netherlands we have a lot of wind, and moisture.
The lowest temperature I ever experienced in The Netherlands was -18 degrees.
I was lucky to have a good motor suit on.
It protected me from the wind, moisture and temperature.
Like a diving suit.
People who wear normal clothing under this conditions get seriously under cooled. (hypothermia)

Another experience I had was in the Northern Atlantic, on board of my Navy ship.
The sun was shining, I didn't feel the -30 degrees.
Why? The air was pure. The sun gave a lot of warmth.
But I didn't realize my body froze on the shadow side.
The face feels the temperature, and so if you turn your face to the sun, your body is fooled that it is warm.
The best way to get ill.

(In Europe we use degrees Celcius for temperature)

Info: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/windchill/

Windchill isn't complete.
Moisture should also be taken into account.

Anton, Bear's den
28-05-11, 00:23
I wonder how Russians live with -30c? In Balcan when the temps are -10c or -15c(Which almost never happens) the schools stop.

Such terrible weather usually only 1-3 weeks per year. Buildings and clothing are designed for such kind of weather here. Plus the force of habit.

Antigone
28-05-11, 06:12
I can't even begin to imagine how -30C must feel, the coldest I've ever experienced is only -2 or -3C! Greece almost grinds to a halt whenever there is substantial snow and the schools all have to close. The wind chill is always bad though, even when it hasn't snowed.

I'm OK with heat and am comfortable with anything up to 40C, over that is not so good. The worst was 47C once in Australia, one can always get warm enough when it is cold but there is no way of escaping extreme heat.

Reinaert
28-05-11, 09:43
@Antigone
Well, the problems of extreme cold are nearly the same as extreme warmth.

You feel well up to 40C, but it it were 40C in The Netherlands, we would be in serious trouble.
The combination of again, moisture, temperature and the lack of wind would cause serious overheating.

Especially older people with health problems would have a high risk of death.

I once experienced such a warmth of 35C, and a colleague from Somalia (!) told me he had never felt such heath!

Antigone
28-05-11, 10:52
Ha, yes I can understand how your colleage felt Reinaert, 35 is very nice weather! But it is interesting how people adjust to the varying climates in the world, Anton feels OK with -30 yet those accustomed to warmer climates would have real difficulty coping and vise versa.

Mzungu mchagga
28-05-11, 16:07
@Antigone
Well, the problems of extreme cold are nearly the same as extreme warmth.

You feel well up to 40C, but it it were 40C in The Netherlands, we would be in serious trouble.
The combination of again, moisture, temperature and the lack of wind would cause serious overheating.

Especially older people with health problems would have a high risk of death.

I once experienced such a warmth of 35C, and a colleague from Somalia (!) told me he had never felt such heath!

Absolutely! 35°C in the dry interior of Tanzania felt cooler and much more comfortable than 35°C along the humid river Rhine in Europe. However, at the Tanzanian coast and it's islands, where humidity is high especially during the rain season, 35°C felt really hot.

LeBrok
28-05-11, 17:19
There is also acclimatisation factor. First year in Africa can feel much hotter than next one when body gets used to the heat. Feels at least 5c degrees cooler. Likewise feeling the cold first year in Siberia, or my home town Calgary, is terrifying. Almost every winter we have 3 weeks with -35C. Luckily Puerto Vallarta in Mexico is only 4 hours by plain.
You get on plain in -30C, 4 hours later you disembark the plain in +30C :good_job:

Mzungu mchagga
28-05-11, 17:32
There is also acclimatisation factor. First year in Africa can feel much hotter than next one when body gets used to the heat. Feels at least 5c degrees cooler. Likewise feeling the cold first year in Siberia, or my home town Calgary, is terrifying. Almost every winter we have 3 weeks with -35C. Luckily Puerto Vallarta in Mexico is only 4 hours by plain.
You get on plain in -30C, 4 hours later you disembark the plain in +30C :good_job:

Oh wow, a temperature difference of 60°, that's really a lot! :petrified:

My greatest temperature jump between two airports I've ever experienced was only 50°C :laughing:

Petros Houhoulis
09-09-12, 10:38
Temperatures have fallen to -30'C (-22'F) in Moscow and nearly -60'C (-76'F) in Siberia, for the first time since 1902. Cold weather has already claimed 100 lives in Russia this winter.

Expect more of these abnormal temperatures in the future. Despite the urban myth that the coastlines shall suffer the most of the global warming, the most serious problem that is arising is that the areas away from the sea shall face more extreme temperature variations in the future, because the sea acts like a global thermostat, and as a result the continental areas shall be experiencing cold waves and heat waves more often.

Think of the atoms, behaviour while it is not much charged (the electrons move close to the proton) but when the atom is charged the electrons move at more unusual orbits which bring them both closer and farther away from the proton...

albanopolis
03-04-13, 00:42
Personally for me the minus 30 degrees of Celsius is a border line with tolerant and intolerant. When frost more than minus 30 becomes difficult to breathe. Although for Siberians it's ok, probably because the frost in Siberia is "dry", not wet like in European part of Russia.
I don't blame them for drinking vodka instead of water. What amuses me is the fact that they are selling all the heating gas. The Americans should immediately stop building the rocked shield. It will not be needed. 30 yrs from now, their gas will run out and they will be mumified from cold. There is no way of heating all those megacities with wood or coal. Everyone willbe suffocated.

intorg
18-11-13, 16:01
Same degrees can also be seen in Eastern parts of Turkey in almost all winters.

LeBrok
18-11-13, 18:13
These days it seems like we are in cooling phase of global warming. ;)

Aberdeen
18-11-13, 20:10
I agree with those who mention the wind chill. If it's -30C in January with no wind chill, it's not so bad if you're dressed for it. If it's -30C with a windchill that makes it feel like -60C, you can't stay outside too long or you will die. However, we no longer get much of that kind of weather in central Canada. Weather like that is apparently still common in the western part of the country, until you cross the mountains and reach the Pacific coast, where the climate is much milder because of the ocean. I wonder if the colder weather in western Canada and Russia has anything to do with the way the magnetic pole has been moving further west towards eastern Siberia.

LeBrok
05-03-14, 08:37
This year Canada experienced the coldest winter in 40 years.