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Tokis-Phoenix
03-03-06, 05:36
Over the last 20yrs in particular, there has been a great change in the views and opinions towards smoking tobacco and smoking in general across the world, particularly with the onset and actions of various smoking bans taking place in various countries/areas- this is just curiosity poll/thread on smoking, I myself have smoked for many years but have been cutting down a lot recently(the average varies a lot, but usually between 4 and 8 a day, I keep a diary of these things) although I have not made up my mind yet when exactly I want to quit yet, as its not something I want to make a life habit of, if only because of the cost of it and for my fiancé, who although smokes himself, is worried that something may happen to me down the line so wants me to quit by the end of this year(he has plans to give it up when I do).
This is not a smoking bashing thread (Ifm sure most people are aware of the dangers at least to a certain extent anyways now days of it as well) and please be respectful and polite if you have anything to say :cool: .

Glenn
03-03-06, 05:53
I'm a former smoker. I quit about five times before the last time (hopefully it really will be the last time). When I did smoke I smoked close to a pack a day, and when I would go out drinking I would probably cover that in a few hours. Now, though, it's been I think two years since I quit, and while I've had maybe six cigarettes since then, they still smell pretty awful to me. When I smoked after I quit it was in a time of nostalgia and when I had been drinking, but I think I'm over that now. Anyway, it's nice being smoke-free now, for various reasons. One is not having to freeze to have a cigarette in the winter, another is not having to suffer the oppressive heat and humidity of south Louisiana summers (that was actually what motivated me to quit in the last place). Of course, neither of those would be problems for me now, being in Hawaii, but I'm not going to be here forever. Anyway, that's my story. :-)

lastmagi
03-03-06, 06:09
I have one or two friends that smoke. Me, I've never smoked at all. It seems these kinds of people [nonsmokers] are actually kind of rare these days...?

Tokis-Phoenix
03-03-06, 06:09
I'm kinda the oposite in some respects Glenn, ever since i was a child(as far back as i can remember) for as long as i can remember, i always thoroughly enjoyed the smell of tobacco being smoked(sounds weird i know :blush: ), in fact, i've always generally enjoyed the smell of alot of burning things like different varieties of wood.
I went on holiday to Australia over a year ago to visit some of my family for an 11day holiday, in Australia there is alot of Tobacconists/places selling a huge variety of tabacco, i remember finding this great tabacco called "Log Cabin Tobacco" and although it was very pricey thus coming in a metal tin, containing no added chemicals and was not even cut, i thoroughly enjoyed it but it was very satisfying and i smoked very little of it(as less as one or two a day or none at all). Unfortunatly i've never been able to find it since in my home country(England), but if i could i would be very happy as i noticed not only was it enjoyable far healthier in comparsion to the large majority of other tabacco's out there, i also noticed it would be somthing easy to move onto to give up on(i don't smoke cigerettes, just "rollys"/hand rolled cigerettes).
Even though i dont drink(well, i don't know if you could call 1 smirnoff ice in the last 4months drinking lol :blush: ), i still regually go down to my local pubs to catch up with friends or play pool("yay"!), but i always find i smoke alot more when im busy like that. I didn't really give up drinking for any reason in particular, i guess it was just because i could when it came down to it, although i used to drink a huge amount of cider when i was younger(i'm only 20 years old by the way :blush: )- i seemed to smoke less though when i used to drink in the past for some weird reason though.

Tokis-Phoenix
03-03-06, 06:13
I have one or two friends that smoke. Me, I've never smoked at all. It seems these kinds of people [nonsmokers] are actually kind of rare these days...?

I would say its the total oposite, there's far more non-smokers or anti-smokers than there are smokers where i live in general, although i don't know about america as i live in england. Everywhere you look over here theres adds and campaigns trying to make you quit, which is really ironic IMO considering there's been a large increase in pro-drinking/alchohol adds everywhere.

Glenn
03-03-06, 06:20
There are plenty enough anti-tobacco commercials here, trust me (I'm especially referring to those annoying "truth" commercials). Also, I think in California and New York there are bars where smoking isn't allowed, as well as entire restaurants in many parts of the country.

On a side note, where I'm from is known as "Cancer Alley," and aside from the high concentration of chemical plants in the area I believe it's also home to the highest concentration of smokers. So, not smoking there has been a challenge. Oh well, enough from the Board of Tourism.

lastmagi
03-03-06, 06:29
Now that I think about it, maybe I was just thinking more about the teenagers in where I live, so that may have biased my answer. I live in a suburban area where you'd be hard-pressed not to find a teenager who hasn't smoked (usually marijuana). Can't say much about other areas, though.

And yeah Toki, I love the smell of burning wood, especially when spring is just around the corner :)

Tokis-Phoenix
03-03-06, 06:37
Most of the anti-smoking adds we get over here are giving up smoking support group adds, and there are also these adds where they'll have a diary/story of some old person dying in hospital of lung cancer or middle aged mother with children who's just found she's gonna die because of smoking sort of thing etc. These adds are on all the time now days, no kidding- i once saw 13 of them in 20minutes during a series of comercial breaks on the same channel! I guess there's nothing in particular wrong with them, its an honorable cause i guess, but it is just blatant emotional blackmail targetted at anyone who smokes, in a similar sense that some christians will use the fear of hell to make people be better christians i guess.
But with the crumbling NHS system over here in england, which is in a seriously bad state right now(some hospitals have completely run out of beds now and are beginning to move patients out of the hospitals back into their own homes because of the hospital bed shortage crisis :shock: ), with these 24/7 anti smoking comercials that are costing millions of pounds every week to show on TV, i often wonder if some of this money would be better spent back in the hospitals where they really seriously need it :? ...?

Mitsuo
03-03-06, 06:42
My dad tried to counter act a bill that has been passed in Utah. The bill that he was trying to stop was trying to make all bars non-smoking. He tried to counter act it with a bill that let the bar owners have a choice as to whether or not they would allow it. My dad wanted the owners to have a choice, but others wanted a law to prevent smoking. Messed up. It takes away the business.

Tokis-Phoenix
03-03-06, 06:46
My dad tried to counter act a bill that has been passed in Utah. The bill that he was trying to stop was trying to make all bars non-smoking. He tried to counter act it with a bill that let the bar owners have a choice as to whether or not they would allow it. My dad wanted the owners to have a choice, but others wanted a law to prevent smoking. Messed up. It takes away the business.

How do you feel on this subject? Do you think that pub owners should have the choice wether they want a smoking pub or not or do you think that there should be certain steps that a pub landlord should have to take if he wants a smoking pub- or do you feel that smoking should be banned completely in pubs whatever the situation/circumstances :? ?

SortOf
03-03-06, 07:13
Occasionally only, never made a strong habbit of it.

Ma Cherie
03-03-06, 07:49
I don't smoke and never thought of taking up the habit. I could never stand the smell of smoke, and at times I try to stay away from smokers because I don't want to the smell to get into my clothes. :eek:

But that's just me. :bluush:

strongvoicesforward
03-03-06, 09:17
I don't smoke and never thought of taking up the habit. I could never stand the smell of smoke, and at times I try to stay away from smokers because I don't want to the smell to get into my clothes. :eek:
But that's just me. :bluush:

Not just you. Me, too. The smell disgusts me and I try to avoid it as much as possible.

Strange how some smokers don`t even seem to be aware that they stink.

Riyko
03-03-06, 09:48
My dad tried to counter act a bill that has been passed in Utah. The bill that he was trying to stop was trying to make all bars non-smoking. He tried to counter act it with a bill that let the bar owners have a choice as to whether or not they would allow it. My dad wanted the owners to have a choice, but others wanted a law to prevent smoking. Messed up. It takes away the business.

:relief: so smoking isn't allowed in bars here in Utah? XD I didn't know that, but then I don't ever pay attention. Also Utah has a law where you have to be 19 to buy cigerettes here so if you ever plan on moving here and your under 19 and you smoke kick the habit >_<

Flashjeff
03-03-06, 11:28
I've never smoked in my life, never even considered trying it. Going back to when I was a kid, I thought it didn't make any sense and was a stupid habit. I hated the smell most of all as I found it absolutely repulsive. Still do. As I grew up, I read about how dangerous smoking is, and later, saw first hand how it can slowly kill when my mom, a lifetime smoker contracted lung cancer and eventually died from it.

In September of 1992, she was diagnosed with lung cancer, despite surgery, chemo and radiation, she wasted away from the disease, by December, she was bedridden, reduced from a vibrant, active woman to a mere shell, by mid-January, she was gone at only 58, ironically, the same age George Harrison was when he died from lung cancer years later. When I see people smoking, I can't help but wonder if they know what they're getting into, if they know they're potentially shortening their lives.

But then, it's their lives to throw away if they so choose, so I just worry about keeping myself healthy as best I can.

Kinsao
03-03-06, 11:52
I have smoked in the past, but not on a regular basis and I don't any more.

My father had multiple lung collapses on and off for 2 years, starting when he was 17, due to smoking (since age 11). His scars were very impressive (looked like he was a fallen angel who had his wings cut off) but didn't encourage me to aspire to them. Especially as thoracic surgery is the most painful you can have. :sick:

However, my main reasons for not smoking were (a) because I was a cyclist more at that time and had ambitions, and (b) I loved singing (and also had ambitions in that direction, but that's another story ^^). I started singing lessons at age 19 and, although I hadn't smoked for several years before then anyway, ever since then smoking has definitely been out of the question for me.

Oh, I forgot (c) - it was like putting money down the drain. :(

scieck
03-03-06, 11:55
I have quit smoking 2 years ago for the following reasons:

i am enjoying life, i don't want to depart from it any earlier than i should
here in england a packet of cigarette cost around &#163;5.00, that is about $7.50 or 7.50 euros more or less
it annoyed the hell out of me to give the greatest part of this money to the government, just so i could slowly kill my self
i was very aware of stinking after having smoked a cigarette
it is just so uncool to smoke

To quit smoking is the hardest battle i had to fight, but winning it gave me great satisfaction, inproved my health and left me with the confidence to be able to fight any obstacle that this beautiful but some time hard life places in front of us.

miu
03-03-06, 12:23
I used to smoke maybe 3 to 5 cigs a day and now smoke only if I go out. I first smoked when I was 16 or and it was sort of my 'teen rebellion' thing because I didn't drink at all when I was younger (most people here start with dirnking rather than smoking)... Nowadays I don't have any reason to smoke so I quit it and plan to reduce it even when I go out - there just aren't any benefits to it, you only feel crap afterwards. :okashii:

I still think that people should be more respectful to other people's choices, both smokers and non-smokers. There are some non-smokers who are extremely rude to smokers (and vice versa, of course), which is completely unnecessary. It's enough if you politely ask them not to smoke near you... I think that most smokers will go somewhere else to smoke if you ask them.

Mike Cash
03-03-06, 13:48
This thread seems to take for granted that "smoking" = "cigarettes".

Kinsao
03-03-06, 14:00
Well, I regularly smoke cheroots. :smoke:

Actually, I did forget, I occasionally smoke a hookah, with apple or melon tobacco (not kidding). :-)

moffeltoff
03-03-06, 14:44
I only smoke ciggaretts when I go out but I quite frequently smoke shisha.

nurizeko
03-03-06, 15:14
I tried smoking when i was in school, and ive had a few cigarettes over the years but so few its basically not worth considoring me as a smoker.

i could probably still count all the cigarettes ive ever had in a single hand.

ive passively smoked pot before, i tried to smoke it properly once but i couldnt breath afterwards so i just dont touch that s*** at all.

Im quite pleased i dont have an addictive personality.

RockLee
03-03-06, 15:44
I tried it once, weed too...nearly killed me! I hate smoke, my eyes hurt because of it and I get short of breath because of smoke.

You really STINK out of your mouth when you smoke, even worse when it's cigars IMHO.
I'm happy now they banned smoking from pretty much all public places.It's a nasty habit :souka:

@Mike : I think it's smoking in general, also cigars ;-)

lineartube
03-03-06, 16:34
..err... smoking 3-4 cubans cigars a year counts? If so, then yes. And why? Because I like it and it is a liberty and pleasure that I wan't to enjoy for as long as I can.

Tokis-Phoenix
03-03-06, 17:15
I started smoking when i was about 13yrs old, although it happened before then too but only rarely- i've always had a tough family life, most of my family are dead, so i guess i just started smoking to fit in with various crouds at the full time boarding school i went too at the time when i went through a rebelious stage in my life as a kid.
I never thought about giving up smoking until i met my fiance, as before then i always felt i had no one and nothing to live for, and there's been alot of times in my life where i couldn't care less what happened to me- now that i have meaning to my life i have more reason to take care of myself more i guess now :bluush: .
Just because you give up smoking though does not mean you won't get cancer somwhere down the line, even lung cancer, as there are millions of things we consume every day that have cancer causing chemicals and other things that are very unhealthy for us- you could get run over by a car tomorrow, or fall down the stairs, or get stabbed etc; in my life i have only come to realise that the worst kind of death to grieve and suffer over is the quick death, as you never get a chance to say "good bye" or come to terms with it easily, but...I know if i can take care of myself better, then at least perhaps the ones that love and care for me may not have to suffer tradgedy so early on and frequently in their lives as i did...

Tokis-Phoenix
03-03-06, 17:17
Not just you. Me, too. The smell disgusts me and I try to avoid it as much as possible.
Strange how some smokers don`t even seem to be aware that they stink.

"ahem" 'tis not a smoking bashing thread here u'know.

Mitsuo
03-03-06, 19:12
How do you feel on this subject? Do you think that pub owners should have the choice wether they want a smoking pub or not or do you think that there should be certain steps that a pub landlord should have to take if he wants a smoking pub- or do you feel that smoking should be banned completely in pubs whatever the situation/circumstances :? ?


Well, for one I have never smoked or ever wanted to, so to me it doesn't matter, in fact I would like to go into a bar and not breath in second hand smoke. But. Yes, I do think the pub owners should have the choice as to whether or not smoking is allowed. I guess there could be some circumstances that may be considered, but I haven't done all of my research, so I couldn't say for sure. The reason I am pro-choice is because there are more non-smoking bars and other areas here in Utah, than there are smoking.
To me it's just like stores. They should be able to supply or not supply a product if that's what they see fit. Like that one Birth control product that women are after (It's like an abortion, but using a pill). They are suing I think Walmart? just because they don't carry it. If they don't want to carry it then they shouldn't have to. It's starting to turn into socialism. I don't know about you guys, but where I live, we are being forced to have fluoride in the water systems. NOT GOOD.

Tokis-Phoenix
03-03-06, 20:04
Well, for one I have never smoked or ever wanted to, so to me it doesn't matter, in fact I would like to go into a bar and not breath in second hand smoke. But. Yes, I do think the pub owners should have the choice as to whether or not smoking is allowed. I guess there could be some circumstances that may be considered, but I haven't done all of my research, so I couldn't say for sure. The reason I am pro-choice is because there are more non-smoking bars and other areas here in Utah, than there are smoking.
To me it's just like stores. They should be able to supply or not supply a product if that's what they see fit. Like that one Birth control product that women are after (It's like an abortion, but using a pill). They are suing I think Walmart? just because they don't carry it. If they don't want to carry it then they shouldn't have to. It's starting to turn into socialism. I don't know about you guys, but where I live, we are being forced to have fluoride in the water systems. NOT GOOD.

There's only 2 pubs i really go too in my town, both of them allow smoking indoors(although there's a smoking ban taking place next year i think in places like pubs). The first one is very spacious, its a very large pub with numerous pool tables and things like that- you can smoke where ever you like in it. The second pub is small, but the smoking area has strong ventilation right above the tables and is close to the door- in both pubs they have an outside area at teh back for socialising.
I don't think its fair that in particular the second pub gets smoking banned in it, because the ventilation prevents any smoke from staying in the room for any period of time and thus the chance or effects of passive smoking are minimal. Although it has no non-smoking area, all the smokers prefer to smoke at the tables next to the ventilation anyways.
I can understand staff getting unhappy about passive smoking/inhaling second-hand smoke, but to be honest the chances of do so are tiny in the second pub- standing next to a car will probably do you more damage. The first pub has ventilation of sorts although not very effective, but its a large pub so the smoke is often very dispersed, and its usually practically empty for most of the week except on fridays, saturadays and sundays.

I think there should be some sort of exceptions to the smoking bans in pubs if the pubs in question make an effort to create a smoker and non-smoker friendly atmosphere, taking steps to improve ventilation, having smoking and non-smoking areas in the pub and taking away cigarette vender machines etc- what do you think?
I agree though in general, as much as the government appears to have honroable intentions, i do not think it should force people to take certain actions like this- England is becomming so much of a "nanny state" now days anyways with less and less freedoms, i still prefer to have the choice over things rather than people to force things upon me- even if i wasn't a smoker i would still probably feel this way.

Mitsuo
03-03-06, 20:15
Yeah, I think it would be awesome if they made it smoker, non-smoker friendly. If they were going to force something like that, it should have benefited everybody. But overall, I am still against the new bill.

Dutch Baka
03-03-06, 21:03
I think smoking is Really nice, the only problem is, when you smoke 1, you want to have another 1 later on.. that's why I stoped smoking, because I don't want to be addicted, but yeah sometimes I miss a nice cigarete , especialy when drinking coffee and having some nice conversations, or when I feel REALLY bad...

I smoked stuff also before, especial when I was in australia, and of course here in amsterdam with some friends on a boat, in the park with some beers.. aaa that stuff was just great! Damnn I feel old now hahaha... The last joint I took is already 1 year ago, and last cigarete is around 2,5month ago.

Erik
04-03-06, 01:09
Smoking kills... here is why;
Click here! (http://www.spikedhumor.com/articles/17590/Smoking_Kills.html)

Dutch Baka
04-03-06, 01:22
Smoking kills... here is why;
Click here! (http://www.spikedhumor.com/articles/17590/Smoking_Kills.html)

A bus can also kill you:relief:

MeAndroo
04-03-06, 01:44
I've only smoked when fairly drunk, and even then I make it a point not to inhale most of the time. Like a cigar, just having the tobacco smoke in your mouth can create a nice buzz that accompanies alcohol well. This might be lost on regular smokers, but as someone who's done it maybe 6 or 7 times in life, it's kinda neat. I hate the smell that gets into my clothes, though.

As far as smoking other things...let's just say I hang out with a lot of people who vote for the Green Party :D

strongvoicesforward
04-03-06, 03:38
Many Smokers: "Ahem."

And the hacking coughs. And, what about those gurgling phlegm sounds that just never seem to get coagulated enough to pop out?

I have met people in their early 20's who have smoked since junior high school and they have that hacking cough or that gurgle sound when they try to get the plegm up. I am just wondering, do smokers think they can pass that off as a regular cough? -- or do they sense others around them are looking at them knowing they have the tar lined lung cough?

Dutch Baka
04-03-06, 10:36
There is kinda racisme going on against smokers sometimes I think, it's getting harder and harder for them, to do their pleasure stuff, something they sometimes just need... banned from cafe's, and puplic places, its SOOO UNCOOL to smoke... so yeah even I know that this rules are good, and WHY SHOULD WE SMOKE THEIR STUFF, WHILE WE DON't WANT TO.... but yeah I feel for them.. you get what I mean??

Glenn
04-03-06, 11:16
It's not racism unless it's discriminatory against a race.

Dutch Baka
04-03-06, 11:20
It's not racism unless it's discriminatory against a race.
So how would you call it then?....:souka:

moffeltoff
04-03-06, 11:31
Intolerance?

Glenn
04-03-06, 11:32
Discrimination against smokers, I would assume. Unless you wanted to coin a new term: "smokism." But I don't think that works very well.

Tokis-Phoenix
04-03-06, 18:29
And the hacking coughs. And, what about those gurgling phlegm sounds that just never seem to get coagulated enough to pop out?
I have met people in their early 20's who have smoked since junior high school and they have that hacking cough or that gurgle sound when they try to get the plegm up. I am just wondering, do smokers think they can pass that off as a regular cough? -- or do they sense others around them are looking at them knowing they have the tar lined lung cough?


Well this may sound weird to you pork chops, but i've never had "smokers cough" or a plegmy throat or whatever. I don't think its somthing that every smoker does, from my observations though i believe its a result of chain smoking more than often, which i don't do- so i couldn't say what other coughing smokers think about other peoples opinions of them when it comes to that :blush: .
I've seen hundreds of people over the years that do that gross gurgle sound or hacking cough who have never smoke a cigerette in their life too, even health-loving vegetarians...I once knew a kid about your age years ago who did that 24/7 for years on end(he wasn't a smoker), grossed me out all the time :relief: .

Tokis-Phoenix
04-03-06, 18:43
So how would you call it then?....:souka:

Its discrimination against a group of people, i think though probably mostly because its socially acceptable to do so now days, perhaps even socially admirable, even politically correct in some senses.
Now days for example its seen really bad to discriminate against obese people, but then again you could also hold a grudge against obese people in a similar sense in saying "Oh well, i don't think the money i pay for tax should go towards paying for the care of some fat person because they've got an eating disorder etc"...

ShayLee
04-03-06, 22:46
I don't smoke (tobacco), but did for a short time in first year of high school (not very proud of it).
Sometimes I get this need for cigaret, but fortunatly nobody in my family smokes and I don't want to buy them :P
On very rare occasions I smoke other... stuff.

i always thoroughly enjoyed the smell of tobacco being smoked(sounds weird i know :blush: ),
I like slight smell of tobacco on my clothes - when I come out of bar or club. Yeah, I agree, it does sound little weird *teehee*

Parker
04-03-06, 23:14
I started smoking in high school when I was 13, then quit last year aged 21.

I still enjoy the smell of smoke though, and I'll take the side of smokers when it comes to matters political.

I still miss smoking sometimes (like right now for example), but I wouldn't start again as, above all else, I enjoy having a sense of smell.

Kinsao
06-03-06, 12:17
Hey, Shaylee - and I thought I was the only person in the whole world who actually didn't mind the smell of second-hand smoke on their clothes! :blush: I put it down to nostalgia - gives me that "ahh, the memories of good nights out when I was younger" feeling!

As far as smoking in bars and pubs, I don't know yet what I think... :worried: I can understand it is a problem for people who have asthma or other breathing problems, and yes, why should they have to breathe in smoke when they go out? It's an unhealthy habit... but on the other hand, people need some freedom too. I mean, if the government suddenly decided to ban smoking altogether, even such an extreme measure would be more understandable than this allow-it-but-kind-of-rely-on-social-disapproval-to-keep-it-in-check approach. If the Powers That Be said "It's bad for you, it damages your body, people shouldn't do it (not even a little)", then I might grumble or whatever, but you can kind of see where it's coming from even if you disagree.

I think a pub or bar ought to have a seperate room for smokers, that's well-ventilated with extractors etc. It doesn't completely solve the problem but it helps. Also it's better for the people who work in the bar; they don't get the choice except to be in a smoky environment otherwise.

Maybe one solution could be to have a kind of 'license' to have a smoking bar/pub? Basically so that the local whoever is responsible for town/city planning can keep an eye on the proportion of smoking and non-smoking bars, and keep a balance of both. For example, if you want to open a new pub, and there is already 65% of smoking pubs, you wouldn't be allowed to open another one but would have to make it smoke-free. Say a proportion, a city is not allowed to have less than 30 or 35% non-smoking pubs.

I'm rambling.... :bluush:

Tsuyoiko
06-03-06, 14:33
I have never smoked in my life. My parents smoked when I was very young, but they both gave up over 25 years ago. None of my friends or immediate family smoke. I hate the smell of smoke and choose not to go anywhere where people are smoking. Sometimes I don't have a choice, if I have to go to a 'do' where people are smoking - as soon as I get home all my clothes go in the washing machine and I go in the bath!

My local pub is half-and-half. Until this week you had to walk through the smoking area to get to the non-smoking, which was a pain. They swapped it over at the weekend and it was much better. I would be happy for it to stay that way. When it gets banned next year, smoking will still be allowed on the patio, which runs the whole length of the pub - I think the smoke will come in through the doors and it will be worse than how it is now.
Maybe one solution could be to have a kind of 'license' to have a smoking bar/pub?That sounds like a good idea to me.

Mikawa Ossan
06-03-06, 14:37
That sounds like a good idea to me.
Me too. Rather than the wholesale banning of smoking in bars/pubs, this license idea sounds like a good compromise.

And Parker, I like your avatar!

Mitsuo
11-03-06, 07:41
I have the perfect Non-Smoking commercial. But I won't share it because I don't want it stolen.:-) :cool:

Kara_Nari
23-03-06, 17:06
I started smoking when I was about 11, no pressure, just curiosity killed the cat.... I had part time jobs so never had to rely on my parents money to buy cigarettes, so when they found out (around 12) they couldnt really say anything, because I was always told, if I earn my own money, I can spend it on what I wish.
However when I started hairdressing (16) I stopped smoking in the day, just because I didnt want to smell like an ashtray whilst working.
Sometimes (once in a blue moon) I will have a cigarette in the daytime, usually on holiday, when it just seems right.
I enjoy smoking though, and when the time comes to quit (when I am pregnant or married to someone who doesnt like it) I think that I will be able to do it really easily. I dont need to have one everyday, but I LOVE smoking when drinking.

sl0thmachin3
24-03-06, 13:47
Nope. I don't smoke. I've tried it though and I did not like it at all. That was way back in high school. Actually it was for practice so I could try weed next. Weed is fun. Didn't make it a habit though. Just puffed some at parties.

maeku
24-03-06, 14:04
I have been a sports-freak all my life... 29 years that is... but this year I have stopped practising and I am guilty of taking u pa bit os smoking after breaking up with my ex...

I smoke on the weekends.. while have a few (lot) drinks.. :p

gosh.. u dont realize it until u write about it.. I guess I became s smoker... ewww.... :smoke: I shouldnt be.... now I am a bit :worried:

Mars Man
24-03-06, 16:42
Well, I been down the smoking road before. . .cigarettes and cigars, banana peelings and tea, and a few other things. My first cigarette was when I was in Jr. high. But, for whatever reason, I never got hooked. I never smoked regularly, most usually when drinking (after highschool that is) and have extremely seldom smoked since I had married (the second time).

I agree about the license for the 'smoking bars'. And that little dancing milk man is really a great one !!!

Takaryo
24-03-06, 16:43
I'm too young to smoke. :D I've always wondered by the way, does different type of cigarettes taste different and is it really tasty? o___O
I don't smoke, but I drink coffee. ^^

Kara_Nari
24-03-06, 17:30
New Zealand has a 'no smoking' in public inside areas policy... which was fine for me even though I am a smoker.
I noticed in Shanghai that there are a lot of places where you can smoke wherever you like... some shops (retail clothing stores etc) have no smoking signs, but who really would smoke while trying on clothes?

happyblinker
24-03-06, 18:48
I don't smoke but have tried it a few times in my life...

Tokis-Phoenix
25-03-06, 17:21
I am suprised there is only 2 regular smokers on this forum, or perhaps they are just to shy, lazy or ashamed etc to vote on the poll :? ? I think a lot of people think twice about coming out about their bad habits now days.

ullvarg
25-03-06, 22:31
I started smoking when I was 15, started out at wile drinking and then worked it into my day to day life. After 2 years I was up to 1 pack a day and loosing my breath after walking up some stairs. I thought about my options and after a wile I went over to Snus (Swedish tewing tobacco, comes in small bags witch I put under my lip). Nowadays I still use snus and I smoke a pack when I go out drinking witch is almost never, I still miss the smell (both in the air and on my cloths) and the relaxing feeling of a cigarette. I don't know what will happen in 1.5 weeks when I go to Japan since I won't get a hold of any snus and me really doubt that I will be Abel to get of the habit.

BTW I grew up with second-hand smoke, both my parents are former smokers My dad used to smoke 2 packs a day but quit a couple of years before I was born and my mom Smoked a pack a day until I was 7.

Except for cigarettes I usually smoke a cubano for new years and I have tried weed a couple of times when I was younger but I got some kind of allergic reaction to it.

strongvoicesforward
28-03-06, 16:36
On Sunday Scotland became the first place to ban smoking in public places in Britain. Nice to see Scottish decision makers trying to clear the air for their citizens. Why should those non-smokers have to put up with the dirty habit of others? -- a habit that puts a host of carcinegens into the air and into the lungs of others nearby.

Good on Scotland. I hope the rest of Britain follows suit, as well as the rest of the world.

What "right to smoke?" Do I have a right to light up a sulfur candle in the middle of a crowd? Or set off a 4-Gone fogger? What would happen if I ran around with a can of Black Flag, spraying it in the faces of passersby at random? I'd be arrested for assault with a deadly weapon, and probably also brought up on terrorism charges, and I'd deserve it mightily. So why do people addicted to inhaling an insecticide (not only is it a common ingredient in organic bug sprays that's also its function in the tobacco plant) believe they have a right to spew noxious, toxic, carcinogenic fumes all over the place in public?
-- James H. H. Lampert

You tell 'em, James!

Mycernius
28-03-06, 22:33
The rest of Britian is following suit next year. I'm all for it. At least I can then go to a pub and not come out smelling like a cigarette. Good quote, Voices.
On a side note, Nicoteen falls into the class one poison catagory in the UK. The same as cyanide and arsenic. And animal by-products are also used in the manufacture of some cigarettes. So next time you see a vegetarian smoking you can ask them if their fags are animal friendly

kirei_na_me
28-03-06, 22:39
I have smoked on and off since I was about 18(freshman at college). I bought my first pack of cigarettes at 14, but I never really inhaled... :p

Anyway, I go through phases. I'll start smoking, smoke for a few months, and then quit for a year. I've been on the longest smoking streak that I've had in a long time, here recently, though.

I started smoking back in August when my in-laws were here and my cousin gave me one of her cigarttes. Here it is at the end of March, and I'm still smoking. I smoke a maximum of about four cigarettes per day, though, so not TOO bad, although any smoking at all is horrible.

I mean, here I am, raised in tobacco country. I come from a line of tobacco farmers that started farming it when they got off the boat from England in 1622. All four of my grandparents smoke or have smoked. Most of my great-aunts and great-uncles smoke, my uncle smokes, etc. etc. Some have died of lung cancer, some have had strokes due to smoking, and of course, emphysema.

I always swore I'd never smoke, but when I got into college, it was hard to not smoke when I had friends all around me who did. The good thing about me, though, is that I can quit cold turkey. I can put them down and leave them if I want to. I never "wig out" if I can't have a cigarette. I went a week without one a couple of weeks ago, and I didn't miss them. My cousin comes around, gives me one, and I start up again.

Oh well. I'll kick it for good one of these days.

Hideki_Matsui_Beast
28-03-06, 22:56
I normally smoke about 3-5 cigarettes per day, and have since I was 17. I can quit cold turkey too though, so I guess I'll wind up quitting for good one day. I think I'm going to either quit when I finish college or when I get married. I know I know, that's what they all say.
I'm fo real though! :p

Tokis-Phoenix
29-03-06, 17:41
The rest of Britian is following suit next year. I'm all for it. At least I can then go to a pub and not come out smelling like a cigarette. Good quote, Voices.
On a side note, Nicoteen falls into the class one poison catagory in the UK. The same as cyanide and arsenic. And animal by-products are also used in the manufacture of some cigarettes. So next time you see a vegetarian smoking you can ask them if their fags are animal friendly

What animal by products are used in some cigerettes? Never heard that one before :? .

strongvoicesforward
29-03-06, 18:06
When I was in college, one of my friends who was 19 was a smoker. He told us he had been smoking since he was 12. What he used to do in class (before the professor had come in to start the lecture) once in a while to get a laugh was: pinch his nose shut with his thumb and forefinger, take a deep breath -- hold his breath for about thirty seconds to build up pressure and then open his mouth to blow. It was disgusting -- a cloud of black dust particles would literaly come out of his mouth -- obviously pushed up from his lungs.

At first we thought he had just smoked and was holding it in his breath just before he came into the building. But, to show us he wasn`t, he`d do the same thing after the class ended which was a 90 minute class. Oh man! He said it didn`t matter how long he waited and that he could do this.

But, after that I did start paying attention to some of the coughing smokers did. And if I looked closely, I could see some black particle dusts coming out of them as well.

I guess it comes from smokers' lungs. Doesn`t sound attractive and looks even less so.

Left: Healthy lung Right: Smoker`s lung
http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/drobson26a.jpg

No-name
29-03-06, 18:37
Calabasas, CA just outlawed smoking in all public places including outside and in your car. We will have to see how it goes.

Mycernius
29-03-06, 18:51
What animal by products are used in some cigerettes? Never heard that one before :? .
Some of the chemicals used to combine the various crap that goes into cigarettes used refined animal fats. I know this as I used to work at a meat rendering factory years ago. We had a display of various products that used the finished products and one of them were cigarettes.

Tokis-Phoenix
29-03-06, 19:12
Some of the chemicals used to combine the various crap that goes into cigarettes used refined animal fats. I know this as I used to work at a meat rendering factory years ago. We had a display of various products that used the finished products and one of them were cigarettes.

What brand cigerettes were they can you remember :? ? I smoke Golden Virginia tobacco, and hand roll it into cigerettes(i gave up "normal cigerettes" as i wasn't happy about all the chemicals/crap they put into all the brands to preserve the tobacco and give flavor to it as it dries out very quickly in comparison to rolling tobacco due to how it is stored) its just plain tobacco and the rizla's/rolling paper is just plain old thin paper with tree gum glue to stick it together.

Hideki_Matsui_Beast
30-03-06, 01:06
Calabasas, CA just outlawed smoking in all public places including outside and in your car. We will have to see how it goes.
In your car??? That's insane! :okashii:
Sometimes I think about smoking more just a political statement. Smoking has been demonized WAY too much, in my opinion.
:smoke:

Minty
30-03-06, 14:56
I donft smoke, but a lot of my family members do,:smoke: so I have been around second-hand smoking environment many moments of my life.

Well I have tried it once when I was 10? It was a left over of my fatherfs cigarettes and I got caught red handed, and was punished by my action, and I have never attempted to try again afterwards.:auch:

Mycernius
30-03-06, 18:27
I can't really remember the brands. Rolling tobacco is fine. It is used in cigarettes and a binding agent as most cigarettes are blends of tabacco not a single one. Rolling tobacco is usually just one type.

Tokis-Phoenix
01-04-06, 00:06
In your car??? That's insane! :okashii:
Sometimes I think about smoking more just a political statement. Smoking has been demonized WAY too much, in my opinion.
:smoke:

"A ban on smoking in public places - including bars and restaurants - has come into effect in Scotland."

""As a smoke-free nation Scotland can look forward to a healthier future."

"The smokers' lobby group Forest, however, has condemned the Scottish Executive, accusing ministers of misleading the public over the health impact and economic costs of the ban";

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/4845260.stm

"The group's Scottish spokesman, Neil Rafferty, said: "The ban will do nothing to improve the health of the nation, but it will give a warm glow to those who enjoy telling others what to do."

"The anti-smoking fanatics will use the ban to victimise and stigmatise smokers even further."

"They have used abusive and dishonest methods to make smokers feel bad about themselves, even comparing smokers to heroin addicts."

.... .... ....

"The Scottish Licensed Trade Association, which had called for a partial ban, fears 140 pubs could close and 2,500 jobs may be lost."

.... .... ....

"Individuals who flout the legislation face a fixed penalty of 50.

The manager or person in control of any no-smoking premises can be fined a fixed penalty of 200 for either allowing others to smoke there, or failing to display warning notices.

Refusal or failure to pay the fine may result in prosecution and a fine of up to 2,500."

Full report;

"A ban on smoking in public places - including bars and restaurants - has come into effect in Scotland.

It is being hailed as a step forward for health but critics say it will cost jobs and infringe human rights.

More than a fifth of smokers questioned in Scotland plan to flout the ban, which came into effect overnight, a poll by BBC Five Live suggests.

The impact will be watched closely in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, where bans have also been planned.

Last month MPs voted in favour of a total ban on smoking in enclosed public spaces in England, which is due to come into effect in the summer of 2007.

Reaction to Scotland's smoking ban

Northern Ireland is introducing a ban in April next year, while no date has been set yet in Wales.

BBC Radio's Five Live programme discovered that about 21% of smokers surveyed in Scotland planned to ignore the ban.


READ THE SURVEY

The findings in full [85k]
Most computers will open this document automatically, but you may need Adobe Reader
Download the reader here

A total of 1,000 adults throughout the country were questioned by researchers earlier this month.

Of the non-smokers involved in the survey, 37% said they would be more likely to visit pubs and restaurants once the smoking ban was in place.

Responding to the poll, First Minister Jack McConnell said: "We have to be realistic about this. There are going to be people who will be inconvenienced by the ban.

"I think that while we will see some people resisting over the early days of the ban, the vast majority of Scots don't smoke.

"The vast majority of Scots who do smoke want to give up."


Smoker in Scotland
The ban will give a warm glow to those who enjoy telling others what to do
Neil Rafferty
Pro-smoking group Forest

Mr McConnell said this was Scotland's "largest single step to improve its health for generations" and a day of pride for the nation.

Health Minister Andy Kerr also acknowledged the significance of Sunday's action.

He said: "As a smoke-free nation Scotland can look forward to a healthier future.

"A future where Scots live longer, families stay together longer and our young people are fitter and better prepared to make the most of their ambitions."

Dr Peter Terry, chairman of BMA Scotland, said the day would be remembered as "the time Scotland took a bold and politically courageous step".

He added: "On behalf of doctors across Scotland, I thank the Scottish Parliament for introducing this legislation that will help save lives which, for too long, have been cut short by the deadly weed that is tobacco."


SCOTLAND'S SMOKING BAN
Smoking in an enclosed public place - 50 fine
Operators of premises face fines of 200 for allowing others to smoke or failing to display warnings
Enforced by environmental health officers
No smoking signs will carry a named person to whom a complaint can be made
Complaints can also be logged by calling 0845 130 7250
Ban covers most indoor places and workplaces, not homes
Smoking allowed in shelters which comply with regulations

The smokers' lobby group Forest, however, has condemned the Scottish Executive, accusing ministers of misleading the public over the health impact and economic costs of the ban.

The group's Scottish spokesman, Neil Rafferty, said: "The ban will do nothing to improve the health of the nation, but it will give a warm glow to those who enjoy telling others what to do.

"The anti-smoking fanatics will use the ban to victimise and stigmatise smokers even further.

"They have used abusive and dishonest methods to make smokers feel bad about themselves, even comparing smokers to heroin addicts."

Research conducted for Five Live by Scottish Opinion suggests 21% of smokers plan to ignore the ban.

Those in their teenage years or early 20s were most likely to do so, the poll of 1,000 adults found.

No smoking sign
Smokers who defy the ban face a fixed penalty of 50

The Scottish Licensed Trade Association, which had called for a partial ban, fears 140 pubs could close and 2,500 jobs may be lost.

Exemptions from the ban include designated rooms in some workplaces, including in adult care homes, hospices, offshore installations and submarines.

Smoking will also be allowed in police detention or interview rooms and in designated hotel bedrooms.

Almost 300 business across Scotland have lodged planning applications this year alone for shelters, canopies or beer gardens to make last-minute alterations in the run-up to the ban.

Individuals who flout the legislation face a fixed penalty of 50.

The manager or person in control of any no-smoking premises can be fined a fixed penalty of 200 for either allowing others to smoke there, or failing to display warning notices.

Refusal or failure to pay the fine may result in prosecution and a fine of up to 2,500." "

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/4845260.stm

......

strongvoicesforward
01-04-06, 10:46
A sad sight to see: A mother and father puffing away in their car while their children are sitting in the back seat.

Often I see this even with their windows completely closed -- no doubt they want to have the benefit of cool air conditioning.

I really relate to this because my parents were heavy smokers and my sister and I would pull our shirts over our nose to try and filter it. But, that was when we knew better at around 7 or 8. Really little kids just happily breath in the fumes.

Some parents think they are doing their children a big favor and protecting them by cracking the window, or even opening it a bit. However, most of the smoke and ashes as they flick it out just comes streaming right back into the backseat collecting there.

I would like to see parents arrested or cited for smoking in a car with children -- perhaps under something like "negligence, endangerment, or abuse."

Tokis-Phoenix
01-04-06, 22:42
A sad sight to see: A mother and father puffing away in their car while their children are sitting in the back seat.
Often I see this even with their windows completely closed -- no doubt they want to have the benefit of cool air conditioning.
I really relate to this because my parents were heavy smokers and my sister and I would pull our shirts over our nose to try and filter it. But, that was when we knew better at around 7 or 8. Really little kids just happily breath in the fumes.
Some parents think they are doing their children a big favor and protecting them by cracking the window, or even opening it a bit. However, most of the smoke and ashes as they flick it out just comes streaming right back into the backseat collecting there.
I would like to see parents arrested or cited for smoking in a car with children -- perhaps under something like "negligence, endangerment, or abuse."

"The group's Scottish spokesman, Neil Rafferty, said: "The ban will do nothing to improve the health of the nation, but it will give a warm glow to those who enjoy telling others what to do."

"The anti-smoking fanatics will use the ban to victimise and stigmatise smokers even further."

"They have used abusive and dishonest methods to make smokers feel bad about themselves, even comparing smokers to heroin addicts."


The above quotes are very true i think, especially for you SVF. Its not that i disagree with what you are saying, but the above quotes apply extremely well to you and that is my point (by the way, if you fail to grasp what i am saying or choose to ignore it, like you do the vast majority of the time, this is not praise i am giving you).


On a slightly different note, i know an aweful lot of non-smokers who do not like the implications of the smoking ban simply because the governments are taking away another peice of their freedom- it may not directly apply to them, but its still freedom lost none the less, and these things add up in the long run.
Drinking/alchohol kills thousands of millions of people worldwide, far more than what years and years of smoking does, it tears families and livelihoods apart- if we apply the same sorts of motives for banning smoking to drinking, then the givernment is completely entitled to outlaw/ban that too. I'm sure there would be riots if they did, but it would be no different- it would be just another peice of freedom to do somthing as an individual lost.

misa.j
02-04-06, 01:14
I used to smoke cigarettes when I was younger and quit when I met my husband. It wasn't hard for me to quit even though I really enjoyed smoking and always kept an extra pack in case I ran out.

I know many smokers, and most of them except one have manners to smoke outside and care about keeping the smoke away from us non-smokers.

anjusan
02-04-06, 01:27
I used to smoke when I first went to college... I smoked for 2 years... then I noticed a strange phenomenon... every time I smoked I got a migraine... it was like shock therapy... I quit one day because I didn't want the migraines... and haven't smoked since... funny enough second hand smoke doesn't give me migraines... but strong odors like perfume do...
Here is an interesting fact... a few people who don't smoke are dieing of lung cancer the major one that comes to mind is Dana Reeve (superman's wife)... so I agree with what previous posters have said... lots of things kill you... I personally think obesity is more dangerous than smoking...
Here is a point of interest for people who smoke brand name cigarettes in the US... they are all sprayed with extra nicotine... in my stat class we dicussed how the tabacco industry justifies to the government that they have reduced the amount of nicotine they spray using statistics...
Personally I like to go into a smoky bar... smoke seems to give it an interesting atmosphere... at least to me... but I feel for the employees...
About that funny cough that smokers get... I have two co-workers who smoke on each side of me... the female smokes 'light' cigs and rarely stinks when she comes back from a 'break'... she doesn't have that annoying cough or gurgle but she gets sick all the time... the guy positively stinks when he comes back... so I asked him to not walk past my cubicle as the odor would wafts into my cubbie... I make him go the long way round... I hear him all day making gross noises... so I guess the point I was trying to make was it is an individual thing...:okashii:

Tsuyoiko
03-04-06, 13:52
The ban will do nothing to improve the health of the nation, but it will give a warm glow to those who enjoy telling others what to do.It will be a long time before it can be proved whether or not the ban has improved people's health - although I'm sure bar workers will cite lots of anecdotal evidence in quite a short space of time. When I was 16 I went out with a smoker for about a year, during which time I suffered from a terrible cough and ulcerated throat. Within days of us breaking up the symptoms had disappeared. Although I can't prove it, I'm sure it wasn't a coincidence. I support the ban not because I like telling people what to do, but because smoky atmospheres make me very uncomfortable.

They have used abusive and dishonest methods to make smokers feel bad about themselves, even comparing smokers to heroin addictsIf that is true, I think the comparison is unfair in that heroin is illegal and can kill someone much more quickly than tobacco. But I think it's true that most smokers are addicted to tobacco.
On a slightly different note, i know an aweful lot of non-smokers who do not like the implications of the smoking ban simply because the governments are taking away another peice of their freedomWhat about my freedom to be a non-smoker? Someone smoking near to me infringes that right.
Drinking/alchohol kills thousands of millions of people worldwide, far more than what years and years of smoking does, it tears families and livelihoods apart- if we apply the same sorts of motives for banning smoking to drinking, then the givernment is completely entitled to outlaw/ban that too. I'm sure there would be riots if they did, but it would be no different- it would be just another peice of freedom to do somthing as an individual lost.I agree that drinking can cause health problems - but smoking kills far more people. Between 1998-2002, an average of 86,500 in England people died each year from smoking-related diseases (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4003969.stm). In 2004, 6,544 people died in England and Wales from alcohol-related conditions (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1736598,00.html) - in other words, smoking kills 13 times more more people than drinking. Even if we factor in alcohol-related deaths (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/743878.stm) that are not so obvious, estimated to be as high as 33,000, smoking is still far, far more dangerous to the health.

More important to me is that my drinking does not directly affect your health - whereas your smoking directly affects me (not literally yours :relief: ). Before I was a boring old married woman, I used to go drinking once or twice a week in a smoky pub. Every time I went there the smoke upset me - it made me cough and sneeze, made my eyes sore and my clothes smell. But I don't remember a single incident in which someone else's drinking upset me. Irritated me maybe :okashii: :D

As I have said before, I would support a compromise - all bars serving food or admitting children should be completely smoke-free (including beer gardens or patios), but adults-only bars where food is not served can apply for a smoking licence - I guess they could find staff who are smokers who wouldn't mind working there.

Tokis-Phoenix
18-04-06, 18:40
As I have said before, I would support a compromise - all bars serving food or admitting children should be completely smoke-free (including beer gardens or patios), but adults-only bars where food is not served can apply for a smoking licence - I guess they could find staff who are smokers who wouldn't mind working there.

I agree, even though i smoke, i would also settle for a similar compromise.
There's a pub in my town which allows smoking, but where all the smokers sit there is ventilation right above them so the room/s do not become smokey. This also means smokers and non-smokers can sit together and the non-smokers will not be bothered about the smoke as it is sucket up into the vents right above them before it can disperse- i thought this was a cool idea, as although i smoke i can totally understand other people not liking it.
There are also plenty of non-smokers i know who don't mind smoking at all, i think a smoking license for pubs would be a good idea though.

Maciamo
18-05-06, 21:38
Tokis-Phoenix, I am not sure what you meant by "smoking an illegal substance" in your poll. I have tried cannabis, but once was in India and the other in Belgium. It is legal in both countries.

Tokis-Phoenix
18-05-06, 22:57
Tokis-Phoenix, I am not sure what you meant by "smoking an illegal substance" in your poll. I have tried cannabis, but once was in India and the other in Belgium. It is legal in both countries.

The option basically relates to whatever is illegal and smokable in your country- cannabis is illegal (although not in all situations) for the most part over here in england, so if i tried cannabis in england in an illegal situation i would say yes, but if i tried it in a country where it was legal i would say no :) .

Jovialis
25-10-17, 03:44
*11 year thread necromancy* :kaioken:

It's very hard to fully quit smoking. I usually fall in and out of it. The problem is I never should have started in the first place. As I probably have a predisposition to liking nicotine. I can quit for long stretches of time. Nevertheless, if I go out for a few drinks with friends, I may sometimes buy a pack or "loosies" (single cigarettes). I currently have a pack that I regret buying. Perhaps its the inhibition from the alcohol that lures me to it. My GP told me that once the brain gets hooked on it, its impossible to stop the urges; but you must resist.

Nicotine is one of the most addictive (http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/the-5-most-addictive-drugs-in-the-world-a6924746.html) substances you can do; ranked 3rd in the world. If you haven't done it, don't start.

Nevertheless, I can go several months without smoking, at a time. If I do, it's usually just a short day or two flirtation with it.

AdeoF
25-10-17, 03:51
This thread is really old hahahaha.

but no i don't smoke nor would I ever want too

Jovialis
25-10-17, 03:57
This thread is really old hahahaha.

but no i don't smoke nor would I ever want too

You're not missing out.

Angela
25-10-17, 05:27
*11 year thread necromancy* :kaioken:

It's very hard to fully quit smoking. I usually fall in and out of it. The problem is I never should have started in the first place. As I probably have a predisposition to liking nicotine. I can quit for long stretches of time. Nevertheless, if I go out for a few drinks with friends, I may sometimes buy a pack or "loosies" (single cigarettes). I currently have a pack that I regret buying. Perhaps its the inhibition from the alcohol that lures me to it. My GP told me that once the brain gets hooked on it, its impossible to stop the urges; but you must resist.

Nicotine is one of the most addictive (http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/the-5-most-addictive-drugs-in-the-world-a6924746.html) substances you can do; ranked 3rd in the world. If you haven't done it, don't start.

Nevertheless, I can go several months without smoking, at a time. If I do, it's usually just a short day or two flirtation with it.

I smoked for a couple of months when I was around 20 and at university. I honestly didn't get much out of it, and I hated the way my fingers looked yellow and the ashes all over the place. (I'm a clean fanatic in terms of my living and working space.) I just decided to stop and never had any desire to do it again.

I must have my mother's genes where nicotine is concerned. My father was addicted to it virtually his whole life, from around 12, he said, until it killed him in his mid-70s, which was way too young in a family where they were very long lived. However, considering that when young he smoked Italian and Egyptian cigarettes, and then later sometimes two packs a day of Lucky Strikes, and after that cigars and pipe tobacco (and inhaled it all), it's a tribute to his immune system that it didn't get him earlier. He struggled so mightily with it, tried the nicotine gum, etc., but nothing worked. He was just miserable without it.

Now I have to watch my son struggle with it. I told him over and over again not to start, but he did, and he is well and truly addicted. He switched to the e-cigaretees and now to the vape, which I hope is better. I worry about it all the time.

Yet, perhaps because I smelled it for some many years, and smelled it on my father for so many years, especially pipe tobacco, the smell of it is far from unpleasant. After my father died, a friend of his came to see me early one morning to commiserate on our loss. It was winter and he had just come in from cutting wood, and he gave me a deep hug. The smell of the fresh, cold air, the wood, and the pipe tobacco which he also smoked, with the feel of his bristly, pre-shave cheek next to mine hit me like a thunderbolt, and I felt a sense of loss so profound that I burst into tears and my knees almost buckled. Even today, years later and as horrible as it is, the smell of tobacco, especially pipe tobacco, reminds me of my father, and so it ironically makes me feel safe and loved. Human beings are such strange creatures, or at least I am, I guess.

davef
25-10-17, 06:00
Having witnessed horror vids back in grade school about lung disease caused by cigarette smoking, infomercials showing people strapped to an oxygen tank the rest of their lives, and someone who used to smoke who spent far too long catching his breath after walking up a staircase due to his abysmally poor physical fitness (he's clean now!), I have no desire.

I would be happy to turn back time and stop myself from grabbing the booze bottle, especially since I had a weak liver even before then. I'm not an alcoholic, but I drink recreationally and I would be super happy if I could find a substitute.

Jovialis
25-10-17, 18:34
I smoked for a couple of months when I was around 20 and at university. I honestly didn't get much out of it, and I hated the way my fingers looked yellow and the ashes all over the place. (I'm a clean fanatic in terms of my living and working space.) I just decided to stop and never had any desire to do it again.
I must have my mother's genes where nicotine is concerned. My father was addicted to it virtually his whole life, from around 12, he said, until it killed him in his mid-70s, which was way too young in a family where they were very long lived. However, considering that when young he smoked Italian and Egyptian cigarettes, and then later sometimes two packs a day of Lucky Strikes, and after that cigars and pipe tobacco (and inhaled it all), it's a tribute to his immune system that it didn't get him earlier. He struggled so mightily with it, tried the nicotine gum, etc., but nothing worked. He was just miserable without it.
Now I have to watch my son struggle with it. I told him over and over again not to start, but he did, and he is well and truly addicted. He switched to the e-cigaretees and now to the vape, which I hope is better. I worry about it all the time.
Yet, perhaps because I smelled it for some many years, and smelled it on my father for so many years, especially pipe tobacco, the smell of it is far from unpleasant. After my father died, a friend of his came to see me early one morning to commiserate on our loss. It was winter and he had just come in from cutting wood, and he gave me a deep hug. The smell of the fresh, cold air, the wood, and the pipe tobacco which he also smoked, with the feel of his bristly, pre-shave cheek next to mine hit me like a thunderbolt, and I felt a sense of loss so profound that I burst into tears and my knees almost buckled. Even today, years later and as horrible as it is, the smell of tobacco, especially pipe tobacco, reminds me of my father, and so it ironically makes me feel safe and loved. Human beings are such strange creatures, or at least I am, I guess.

My dad still smokes cigarettes, and he's been smoking since he was 9 years old; he's 60 now. I don't think he's ever going to quit : (

I must have his genes in that regard.

My mom smoked too for a few years, but was able to quit cold turkey and never went back to it after decades.

But I know what you mean about the smell of tobacco and linking it to your dad. When I smell my hand after having a cigarette I instantly think of my parents.

I don't know how good vaping is for you, but perhaps your son should try something else like chewing gum. Honestly, I think the biggest part of addiction to cigarettes is really the act of smoking itself. Because after a few puffs, I usually feel disgusted by it. It's more of the habit of doing it, than the satisfaction you get from it I think. Filling the gap of boredom is what drove me to do it sometimes. Perhaps tell him to replace it with some other type of ritualistic act like, making tea. That helped me sometimes.

SoloWarrior
31-10-17, 15:49
Now I have to watch my son struggle with it. I told him over and over again not to start, but he did, and he is well and truly addicted. He switched to the e-cigaretees and now to the vape, which I hope is better. I worry about it all the time.Has he tried the gum, patches, or the pills?

Ivar of Rasa Bol
23-10-19, 14:17
Oh no, never :great: Smoking is poisonous and why "burn" money? :useless:

Yes I tried, as most teenagers of my friends did at that time, but if I suck the smoke into my lungs, I felt unwell and dizzy.

Stuvanè
07-12-19, 21:41
I’m not the one who’s gonna deny that smoking hurts, but sometimes it makes you feel better (in the soul). I am lucky because I don't like cigarettes - this is a very compulsive style of smoking - but I love cigars and, above all, pipes, the so-called "slow smoking". You should not inhale, but you taste it in your mouth and nose, and especially it doesn't create addiction
11666

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Angela
07-12-19, 23:56
I’m not the one who’s gonna deny that smoking hurts, but sometimes it makes you feel better (in the soul). I am lucky because I don't like cigarettes - this is a very compulsive style of smoking - but I love cigars and, above all, pipes, the so-called "slow smoking". You should not inhale, but you taste it in your mouth and nose, and especially it doesn't create addiction
11666

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You look like you could be one of my cousins. :)

My Dad smoked pipes in the latter part of his life. Unfortunately he inhaled even that.

The smell, particularly of cigars (which he also smoked), and pipe tobacco, is so entwined with my love for him and my memories of him that to this day I find it an attractive and even comforting smell on a man.

I don't know if I told the story on this thread, but shortly after my father died a dear friend of the family dropped in at my parents' house to see how I was doing. He was about my father's age, smoked a pipe, like my dad, hadn't shaved so he was a little bristly, and had been out in the cold air cutting firewood, which my dad did all the time. When he hugged me close I felt a jolt of remembrance and love, and just broke down crying. So embarrassing. :(

Smell is a powerful conveyor of emotion.

I never took to it myself, although while at university I smoked for a few months. From what my dad said the nicotine both calms and focuses, so I can well understand why some people really like it.

It just never had much effect on me, other than to make me a little hyper-focused, which I definitely didn't need. It's like caffeine that way. I just can't handle very much of it.

Stuvanè
08-12-19, 11:53
You look like you could be one of my cousins. :)

My Dad smoked pipes in the latter part of his life. Unfortunately he inhaled even that.

The smell, particularly of cigars (which he also smoked), and pipe tobacco, is so entwined with my love for him and my memories of him that to this day I find it an attractive and even comforting smell on a man.

I don't know if I told the story on this thread, but shortly after my father died a dear friend of the family dropped in at my parents' house to see how I was doing. He was about my father's age, smoked a pipe, like my dad, hadn't shaved so he was a little bristly, and had been out in the cold air cutting firewood, which my dad did all the time. When he hugged me close I felt a jolt of remembrance and love, and just broke down crying. So embarrassing. :(

Smell is a powerful conveyor of emotion.

I never took to it myself, although while at university I smoked for a few months. From what my dad said the nicotine both calms and focuses, so I can well understand why some people really like it.

It just never had much effect on me, other than to make me a little hyper-focused, which I definitely didn't need. It's like caffeine that way. I just can't handle very much of it.

Human olfactory abilities are stronger than we want to admit, and I believe that this is even more important for women
http://www.lescienze.it/news/2017/05/12/news/confronto_olfatto_umano_animali-3524999/

Surely this habit of smoking - more or less relaxing - is as old as the world, since even in his Histories - IV book Herodotus spoke of the Scythians burning hemp seeds to get high.
And Mr. Bach also wrote an air inspired by the pipe and its smoke ;)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkgKdVzexsI

Angela
08-12-19, 17:46
Human olfactory abilities are stronger than we want to admit, and I believe that this is even more important for women
http://www.lescienze.it/news/2017/05/12/news/confronto_olfatto_umano_animali-3524999/

Surely this habit of smoking - more or less relaxing - is as old as the world, since even in his Histories - IV book Herodotus spoke of the Scythians burning hemp seeds to get high.
And Mr. Bach also wrote an air inspired by the pipe and its smoke ;)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkgKdVzexsI

Interesting. So maybe this ancient "ability" isn't extinct. I like that they used the ability to smell different "notes" in wine as an example. :)

I've mentioned once, I think, that I could swear that I remember my mother's scent: it was like delicate flowers. I always thought of it as the scent of "goodness". :) I lay on her bed with her when she died and just tried to breathe it in.

I think perhaps that's connected to why dogs and cats seem to hate certain people (and other animals) and love others on what looks like first "sight" but is probably on smell.

Who knows, maybe that has something to do with "love at first sight" with humans as well.

One of the most affecting scenes I've seen in film, one that has been shamelessly copied by other directors, is the scene in "Z" by Costa Gravas where the widow, played by Irene Papas, stands in the closet she shared with her husband, smelling his shirt, and becomes hysterical with grief. That expressive, gorgeous face of hers just crumbled. I totally "got" it.


Ah, my beloved Bach. Yes, what a testimony to the seductive appeal of tobacco. :)

Stuvanè
10-12-19, 11:36
Interesting. So maybe this ancient "ability" isn't extinct. I like that they used the ability to smell different "notes" in wine as an example. :)

I've mentioned once, I think, that I could swear that I remember my mother's scent: it was like delicate flowers. I always thought of it as the scent of "goodness". :) I lay on her bed with her when she died and just tried to breathe it in.

I think perhaps that's connected to why dogs and cats seem to hate certain people (and other animals) and love others on what looks like first "sight" but is probably on smell.

Who knows, maybe that has something to do with "love at first sight" with humans as well.




Correct: the so-called "chemistry" :)