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Maciamo
16-03-06, 21:56
Italians put parmesan, and most people in the world follow suit. In Belgium, it's more usual to put grated Emmental or Gruyere instead. In Japan, mozzarella was the most common grated pasta/pizza cheese (and cheapest) in supermarkets. Parmesan can come pre-grated or in block to cut or slice yourself.

Which you do you like best ?

kirei_na_me
17-03-06, 01:11
I always buy a block of parmesan cheese and grate it on my pasta. I love it.

Cheese is one of my favorite foods. Gruyere is, by far, my favorite cheese. I always have a block of it in my refrigerator. I think I'll grate it on my pasta next time!

Good thread, Maciamo. I love my cheese! :p

misa.j
17-03-06, 01:17
In Belgium, it's more usual to put grated Emmental or Gruyere instead.
Interesting. I think the Swiss cheese I get on my sandwiches is Emmental because it's got holes on it. It's really good with a salami sandwich.

I like using sharp chedder, which is cheap and widely available in the US, for casserole and baked pasta. For the dishes like carbonara, chicken parm, scampi etc, I grate lots of parmesean.

kirei_na_me
17-03-06, 01:22
Ah, Spaghetti Carbonara...one of my favorites!

Kara_Nari
17-03-06, 01:33
I like Parmesan on my pasta, havent yet found where to buy fresh stuff yet...(well, you know, not in a container...), and I really really really love BLUE cheese (Kikorangi blue, a NZ blue), and have been known to put that in my pasta... usually when nobody else is eating it.

MeAndroo
17-03-06, 01:41
Nacho cheese! Delicious! (j/k)

I'm a huge fan of freshly grated parmesean on pasta. I like the block-sliced parmesean better on things like caesar salads. Whatever kind of cheese it is, though, I like a LOT of it. :) That's probably why I end up getting baked pasta more often than not.

Ma Cherie
17-03-06, 03:00
I like grated parmesean cheese on almost all of my pastas. I'll eat it with spaghetti, lasagna, and fetticini with marinara sauce. And I eat it with pizza, cheese to be exact. :cool: :p

Mitsuo
17-03-06, 03:05
Hmm, I am kind of weird when it comes to cheese.

I Hate cheese, but when it comes to Pizza, or Nachos, I love it. I guess it has to be melted. I can't eat cheese freshly cut or in slices, I tend to gag. But I do like parmesean on my spaghetti. Tis gude.

bossel
17-03-06, 05:17
Cheese on pasta? Yuck!

I prefer cheese (I like almost all sorts, just not what Germans call Kochkäse) on bread.

Tsuyoiko
17-03-06, 13:04
I put mozzarella or cheddar on pasta. I also like tortellini pasta stuffed with ricotta cheese. One of my favourite quick lunches is to cook some dry pasta, toss it in some olive oil, oregano and black pepper, then crumble some mature cheddar cheese on top. Yum, yum.

dreamer
17-03-06, 13:20
Gruyere here when I'm not making different cheese sauces.
In the UK I'm using cheedar though :P

Reiku
17-03-06, 13:38
Hmm, there's few cheeses (that I've had anyway) that I don't like--although being poor somewhat limits my access to the more refined cheeses.

For instance, I don't think I ever heard of Emmental or Gruyere cheese--though I may have had some without knowing it was called that.

(I've started doing personal security work for some local artists on the side, and one of the benifits of the job is the cheeses and other catered foods usually present at an art opening--I stay away from the wines when on-duty though. :D)

At any rate, I usually use grated parmesian, mozzerella, riccotta, or just cottage cheese on a can of ravioli or cheddar and macaroni if I'm feeling "ghetto". (or if my pocketbook is :D)

I also love a good alfredo sauce.

I actually don't make pasta very often--and when I do it's usually just buttered noodles as a quick snack--so usually if I'm having pasta it's at a resteraunt.

Pachipro
17-03-06, 19:36
Cheese! I am a cheese nut and just love all kinds of cheese especially on pasta. I also like cheese fondu and cheese and black olives with red wine.

At my age I had to start taking alot of fiber before and after I eat cheese else I will feel it in the morning. I have found Chitosan (http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/psychology/health_psychology/chitosan.htm) (made from shell fish and the best fiber known) to be the best for getting cheese through the system and not letting the fat get into your system.

Before I discovered Chitosan I thought I would have to give up cheese as it was doing terrible things to my bowls and intestines giving me terrible cramps the next day. Today I can eat as much cheese as I desire as long as I take the Chitosan fiber suppliments and the weight gain is not there as in the past. Check out the link.

Flashjeff
18-03-06, 12:46
Count me in for grated parmesean. Yum! But I'm too lazy to grate it myself, so I buy the pre-grated variety from the supermarket! Heh!
:-)

Thor
27-03-06, 12:10
I dislike cheese if it's not on a pizza.

sl0thmachin3
27-03-06, 16:22
Parmesan is a bit expensive so I usually use cheddar.

Anybody here tried Philippine-style spaghetti? The flavor really goes well with cheddar.

Minty
05-06-06, 23:15
Interesting. I think the Swiss cheese I get on my sandwiches is Emmental because it's got holes on it. It's really good with a salami sandwich.
I like using sharp chedder, which is cheap and widely available in the US, for casserole and baked pasta. For the dishes like carbonara, chicken parm, scampi etc, I grate lots of parmesean.

Emmental cheese doesn't necessarily have holes in it. Emmental is the cheese of two countries, France and Switzerland. Not all Swiss cheese that has holes in is Emmental.:haihai:


Italians put parmesan, and most people in the world follow suit. In Belgium, it's more usual to put grated Emmental or Gruyere instead. In Japan, mozzarella was the most common grated pasta/pizza cheese (and cheapest) in supermarkets. Parmesan can come pre-grated or in block to cut or slice yourself.
Which you do you like best ?

I use Parmesan cheese on my pasta, I am not certain whether all French do this but from all the Italian restaurants I have been to in France they always give us parmesan to put on top of our pastas. My husband's family only uses Parmesan cheese on their pastas. My ex Swiss boyfriend also only uses Parmesan on his pastas and he considers other cheese on pasta strange.:D

Freshly grated ones taste better than the powdered ones but because of convenience purposes we often use the powdered ones.:bluush:

I am pretty sure in Australia most people use Parmesan cheese on their pastas; I always received my pastas with Parmesans when I dine out in restaurants in Australia.

Duo
06-06-06, 02:37
Well...aside parmesan, which is damm good.. at times ill eat some past with white feta cheese as well. Is not a traditional thing or anything...is jsut a habit i piked up from my mom. White balkan style cheese, in my opinion, is perhaps the best kind. Althought i don't see it so compatible with pasta.

Meliz
16-05-09, 05:52
Cheese? well, I guess I'll have to go for mozzarella....and even "queso asadero" sort of like string cheese.

Cambrius (The Red)
29-06-09, 19:30
I love all kinds of cheese. My favorites are aged goat's cheese from the French Pyrenees and a sheep's cheese called Serra, from Serra da Estrela in central Portugal. My least favorite cheese is feta. I only like it in salads.

Jovialis
09-03-18, 14:31
I use grated parmesan cheese often. That, and crushed pepper. However, not on every dish.

davef
09-03-18, 15:21
With tomato sauce: parmasean, mozzarella, and ricotta!
Without: Any combination of melted cheddar, mozzarella, or pepper jack, as well as grated parmasean!

There was a macaroni and cheese area where I used to work, you can put anything on your macaroni and cheese, it was the best!

This shouldn't be much of a surprise to most members here who know I'm a human mouse

Night
09-03-18, 16:19
Primarily mac and cheese with cheddar.
Mozzarella is my favorite cheese, and I make Chicken Parmesan and baked ziti, often.

Angela
09-03-18, 17:54
I love all kinds of cheese. My favorites are aged goat's cheese from the French Pyrenees and a sheep's cheese called Serra, from Serra da Estrela in central Portugal. My least favorite cheese is feta. I only like it in salads.

As you say, it depends on the dish. With a putanesca, if I put any cheese I'd put grated pecorino. If it's a meat sauce, I'd put grated parmigiano.

I think Americans have gotten it into their heads that they should put parmigiano on everything. That's not how it is in Italy.

We use a lot of our own grated pecorino toscano where I come from ( although my Emilian grandmother only used parmigiano, for obvious reasons), especially for fillings for vegetables and pasta: it gives a nice piquant note to the finished product.

One of my favorite pasta dishes ever is the Roman cacio e pepe, which is basically just grated pecorino romano and pepper. Yum, yum. :) (Don't put too much salt in the pasta water, because the pecorino is very salty.)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiz1VlWBU2I

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiz1VlWBU2I

This Italian chef uses a different technique and adds a few spoonfuls of parmigiano for sweetness (to cut the too strong saltiness of some pecorino) and some grated lemon rind. Not traditional, and not the way I like it, but an option.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ilkkoHIu17A&list=PL0QucbQ_TDWXBGmU7Iap8n4jRUavbzPAM

I also usually put grated pecorino on most southern Italian sauces.

AdeoF
09-03-18, 18:36
None really but if it's a true formaggio I will take it and eat it. Not mac and cheese pls or any american cheese (there cheese sucks)

Angela
09-03-18, 20:00
There are so many great cheeses, French and Spanish as well as Italian. I love manchego, for example. I can sometimes also get Mahon. A lot of Spanish cheeses are not available, however.

The French ones are wonderful too and much more available. This is just a small number of them:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-kmdVzyjaqxo/T1zjJcvLu_I/AAAAAAAADYY/oK4StDe5ilA/s1600/466703351_9cb6c80d7c.jpg

This is just a small selection of Italian cheeses:
https://i.pinimg.com/736x/f3/1c/40/f31c40e19235339c14f1d35b7a9327bc.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_French_cheeses#/media/File:Principales_AOC_France.jpg

Why would anyone eat "American" cheese? It's not even real cheese. For grilled cheese sandwiches I use mozzarella or a mild Cheddar, or muenster.

My absolute favorite is the Neapolitan "Mozzarella in carozza". If you haven't tried it you should; you may never go back to regular grilled cheese sandwiches. :)

This is the way I was taught to do it by my husband's Neapolitan grandmother. I think it's about as traditional as you can get. I've only made a few changes. I hate pancarre or "American" bread, so I use thinly sliced ciabatta bread or even Tuscan bread and just cut off the crusts. I also don't deep fry it. It uses up so much oil and makes a mess. Also, instead of putting one anchovy fillet, I just put a little smear of anchovy paste. Americans are too afraid of anchovies. If you put a little bit people won't even know it's there, they'll just know it's delicious! :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1THEd1GcGs

Jovialis
09-03-18, 20:19
As you say, it depends on the dish. With a putanesca, if I put any cheese I'd put grated pecorino. If it's a meat sauce, I'd put grated parmigiano.

I think Americans have gotten it into their heads that they should put parmigiano on everything. That's not how it is in Italy.


That's true, I wouldn't put it on for example pasta with clams, or mussels, or mushrooms, or broccoli. For pasta with broccoli, or broccoli rabe, I'll put some lemon and a little bit of salt.

Usually my mother or father will make pasta with meat sauce; a mix of braciole, veal, lamb, etc. in tomato sauce. My mother admits that my dad's towns' version of it is better than her's; and learned it from his mother.

cybernautic
09-03-18, 20:23
Parmesana or Gran Pardano.

But i think Pecorino is also a good one.

I like also alot the Spanish Manchego or some local Greek cheeses like Graviera or Kefalotyri or Dry Myzithra
but Non Greeks probably don't know these Greek cheeses though they are very good.


In general the chesse has to be rather dry/hard and tasty i woud say

Angela
09-03-18, 21:52
That's true, I wouldn't put it on for example pasta with clams, or mussels, or mushrooms, or broccoli. For pasta with broccoli, or broccoli rabe, I'll put some lemon and a little bit of salt.

Usually my mother or father will make pasta with meat sauce; a mix of braciole, veal, lamb, etc. in tomato sauce. My mother admits that my dad's towns' version of it is better than her's; and learned it from his mother.


Yes, I think a lot of Italians call it "gravy". Nonna Anna, my husband's grandmother, made it, and it was delicious. I would make it more often but for whatever reason my husband never liked it that much.

I basically do this, as far as technique is concerned, except for the fact that I add tomato paste to the sauteed onions before adding the meat, and Nonna used just beef, sausage, and maybe spareribs, no ground beef, and once the sauce was almost done, would add fried meatballs that she had made separately. In the old, poorer days I think they used really cheap cuts of meat, like neck and shoulder bones. If I see them in the market I still throw them in: the tastiest meat is near the bone. I sometimes substitute beef short ribs for the chuck too, and put in some veal chunks. I'm trying to approximate the taste of manzo by combining the beef and veal.

This girl gives me hope for young Italian women: she's really good. :)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_xXm7SAUrM&t=70s

Jovialis
09-03-18, 22:20
Yes, I think a lot of Italians call it "gravy". Nonna Anna, my husband's grandmother, made it, and it was delicious. I would make it more often but for whatever reason my husband never liked it that much.

I basically do this, as far as technique is concerned, except for the fact that I add tomato paste to the sauteed onions before adding the meat, and Nonna used just beef, sausage, and maybe spareribs, no ground beef, and once the sauce was almost done, would add fried meatballs that she had made separately. In the old, poorer days I think they used really cheap cuts of meat, like neck and shoulder bones. If I see them in the market I still throw them in: the tastiest meat is near the bone. I sometimes substitute beef short ribs for the chuck too, and put in some veal chunks. I'm trying to approximate the taste of manzo by combining the beef and veal.

This girl gives me hope for young Italian women: she's really good. :)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_xXm7SAUrM&t=70s

We call it that too, or ragu. I want to learn how to make it myself, as well.

Yetos
10-03-18, 00:21
makaronia fits with every cheese due to salt,

just straight makaronia, with no sauce

I think the best cheese is ladotyria Λαδοτυρια
hard cheese stored olive oil with herbs
a fantastic cheese for makaronia

secondary is the Kefalograviera a Hybrid of Kefali (pressed) and graviera (gruyere) made in N Greece, Thessaly and Makedonia

Graviera (gruyere) which is mostly produced in S Greece
IT IS NOT GRUYERE, only the name due to the method of production

Kefali kefalotyri is typical all Greece but mainly in North
it is very old and the older the harder and best for makaroni
and the younger the smoother best for barbeque
There are 2 kinds
the one from pasterized milk
the one from unpasterized milk which is rare and fantastic
but you want find it in cheese industry
All women in my family know to produce such cheese,
and sometimes i make my shelf, as hobby
easy to make the first act,
difficult to make it 'mature'
I Like 6 months old

the old non pasteurised method of kefali
is comparable/simmilar to Parmigianno-Reggiano method
instead of metallic 'mixer' spinner, used wooden knifes
and sheep's milk instead of cow's
making a fantastic result which sometimes blend with herbs or smoke
industry and health laws slowly removed it from production
and today is made exclusively with pasteurized milk
and mostly by adding calcium chemicals
instead of the old 'acid (bacillus reserve) water'

cybernautic
10-03-18, 01:05
makaronia fits with every cheese due to salt,

just straight makaronia, with no sauce

I think the best cheese is ladotyria Λαδοτυρια
hard cheese stored olive oil with herbs
a fantastic cheese for makaronia

secondary is the Kefalograviera a Hybrid of Kefali (pressed) and graviera (gruyere) made in N Greece, Thessaly and Makedonia

Graviera (gruyere) which is mostly produced in S Greece

Kefali kefalotyri is typical all Greece but mainly in North
it is very old and the older the harder and best for makaroni
and the younger the smoother best for barbeque
it is comparable simmilar to Parmigiano-Reggiano
All women in my family know to produce such cheese,
and sometimes i make my shelf, as hobby
easy to make the first act,
difficult to make it 'mature'
I Like 6 months old

Fair enough but Graviera is not only made in North Greece
but also in Crete and Islands.

Also it is a distinct Greek type of cheese and different in taste from Gruyere.

Yetos
10-03-18, 01:09
Fair enough but Graviera is not only made in North Greece
but also in Crete and Islands.

Also it is a distinct Greek type of cheese and different in taste from Gruyere.

read what I wrote

graviera is a ΠΟΠ of Agrafa Crete and Aegean islands

i write S Greece

AdeoF
11-03-18, 21:15
There are so many great cheeses, French and Spanish as well as Italian. I love manchego, for example. I can sometimes also get Mahon. A lot of Spanish cheeses are not available, however.

The French ones are wonderful too and much more available. This is just a small number of them:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_French_cheeses#/media/File:Principales_AOC_France.jpg

Why would anyone eat "American" cheese? It's not even real cheese. For grilled cheese sandwiches I use mozzarella or a mild Cheddar, or muenster.

My absolute favorite is the Neapolitan "Mozzarella in carozza". If you haven't tried it you should; you may never go back to regular grilled cheese sandwiches. :)

This is the way I was taught to do it by my husband's Neapolitan grandmother. I think it's about as traditional as you can get. I've only made a few changes. I hate pancarre or "American" bread, so I use thinly sliced ciabatta bread or even Tuscan bread and just cut off the crusts. I also don't deep fry it. It uses up so much oil and makes a mess. Also, instead of putting one anchovy fillet, I just put a little smear of anchovy paste. Americans are too afraid of anchovies. If you put a little bit people won't even know it's there, they'll just know it's delicious! :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1THEd1GcGs

Ohh now that looks so yummy I wish I lived near a Neapolitan restaurant I really give it a try. Spanish cheese is ok but not the best (but Manchego is great with jamon and local bread) . French cheese can be smelly but works really well with bread or a salad. Anchovies can work if don't add too much taste to it. In Malta Mozzarella is common!



Why would anyone eat "American" cheese? It's not even real cheese. For grilled cheese sandwiches I use mozzarella or a mild Cheddar, or muenster.


Now that's a great quote. British cheese such as Blue cheese, Cheddar and Stilton cheese works well with bread but sadly not pasta.

davef
11-03-18, 21:30
AdeoF, you should try cheddar on pasta, that's classic Mac n cheese right there

AdeoF
11-03-18, 22:05
AdeoF, you should try cheddar on pasta, that's classic Mac n cheese right there

Hmm if it's grated and melted into the pasta with some tomato sauce then it can maybe work but maybe not. to be honest i like spaghetti bolognese. The beef works well with spaghetti and mixes well with cheddar.

Jovialis
11-03-18, 22:31
Yes, I think a lot of Italians call it "gravy". Nonna Anna, my husband's grandmother, made it, and it was delicious. I would make it more often but for whatever reason my husband never liked it that much.

I basically do this, as far as technique is concerned, except for the fact that I add tomato paste to the sauteed onions before adding the meat, and Nonna used just beef, sausage, and maybe spareribs, no ground beef, and once the sauce was almost done, would add fried meatballs that she had made separately. In the old, poorer days I think they used really cheap cuts of meat, like neck and shoulder bones. If I see them in the market I still throw them in: the tastiest meat is near the bone. I sometimes substitute beef short ribs for the chuck too, and put in some veal chunks. I'm trying to approximate the taste of manzo by combining the beef and veal.

This girl gives me hope for young Italian women: she's really good. :)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_xXm7SAUrM&t=70s

Here's what we had this afternoon:

https://i.imgur.com/yiIAUBul.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/XHMtZNPl.jpg

And a little something for afterwards, which was really quite good :)

https://i.imgur.com/uhfmHFtl.jpg

davef
11-03-18, 22:41
Nothing wrong with that lunch jovialis!

And in response to Angela's post, i just looked up American cheese, and I always felt it was the kraft version that was fake but apparently American cheese is classified as "processed" cheese...

Its not the best cheese, too salty and I read horror stories of "pizzerias" putting American cheese on pizza.....I swear I'll be sick after seeing that.

Worse, there are places that use kectchup and American cheese in place of tomato sauce and mozzarella..

davef
12-03-18, 03:08
Also, I think ricotta needs to be among the choices :)! I swear, give me a spoon and a big bowl of that stuff, and I'll be in heaven !!

Angela
12-03-18, 03:25
Here's what we had this afternoon:

https://i.imgur.com/yiIAUBul.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/XHMtZNPl.jpg

And a little something for afterwards, which was really quite good :)

https://i.imgur.com/uhfmHFtl.jpg

Now that's what I call a great looking lunch!

It's too funny...I think I have the same cabinets. It even looks like you have a dark green granite counter top!

If the cook permits it, I'd love the recipe. :)

If you're still drinking amaro you're not far from your roots. :)

@Davef,

I love ricotta too, especially from our local cheese maker so it's nice and creamy. I like it mixed with tomato sauce in a pasta dish, but I absolutely also adore it mixed with a littlehoney or sugar and lots of fresh, sweet fruit in the summer.

http://galbanicheese.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Fresh-Fruit-with-Ricotta-Fresh-Mint-and-Honey-72DPI.jpg

davef
12-03-18, 06:36
Jovialis, you spent 28.99 on that puny thing?? It had better be worth it! Besides, that's the weirdest looking Corona beer/Smirnoff vodka bottle I've ever seen! Wait a minute, that's one a dem wahn bawtles :D.

Lol kidding aside (just messing with you, Jovialis), beer also goes great with Italian food, but this is based on my own personal experience with having beer with pizza. I recommend Corona, you'll thank me later !

Angela, wow, I never knew you could combine ricotta with fruit, I should try that though I'm not a fruit person. I don't have much of a taste for fruits and veggies, but I think I should get one for the sake of eating healthier. I'm big into pasta, cheese, and tender meats (flank beef cuts are what dentists should make their patients eat to extract teeth :) , I swear you need teeth like a lion to bite into those boulders).

dia38europe
30-04-18, 07:27
I love all kind of cheese, but on my pasta I still prefer parmesan, just gives it that "pasta" taste.

ruskabajka
25-07-18, 14:38
apart from parmesan, which is the best, I prefer ementaler

matty74
02-02-19, 12:13
I love all cheese but tend to top almost all pastas with Parmesan. I am a big fan of Greek style “spaghetti” with Romano and butter

Carlos
03-02-19, 09:58
The truth is that I and my father love pasta, but not my mother too much. The pasta arrived in Spain quite late, at least to the tables of the popular homes, as much as the noodles in the soup existed. Macaroni or spaghetti with tomato almost once a week, almost always without cheese, but when I use cheese is cured cheese or also called manchego cheese.

Efrain Garve
26-07-19, 12:38
Only parmesan!
#onelove

Angela
26-07-19, 19:16
Only parmesan!
#onelove

With a lot of pasta dishes I agree, but a good number of Italian pasta dishes, especially from the south, used percorino romano, which has more "bite" or sharpness. It's perfect for some pasta dishes.

Where I was born we're not far from where Parmigiano Reggiano is made so we use a lot of it, but we also have very good Tuscan percorino cheese. For fillings and things like that we mix the two. It gives the filling more "taste" or punch. When I make my Neapolitan grandmother in laws Sunday sauce we always used grated pecorino. That was how it was originally made in Italy and I still think it tastes the best.

Just whatever you do don't buy grated cheese in a bottle or can. Buy a piece and freshly grate it; it makes a world of difference to the result.

TardisBlue
26-07-19, 20:21
Emmental or gruyre, because that's how most people have their pasta in France and I've grown up that way - though now I mostly use grated goat cheese. And always raw, please! Pasteurized cheese is no cheese at all.I like parmesan, I just don't think of using it. I love gorgonzola and mascarpone, as well as the mixture of both - I think it's called gorgonzola e mascarpone in Italy. In France we call it "magor".

Angela
26-07-19, 20:44
Emmental or gruy�re, because that's how most people have their pasta in France and I've grown up that way - though now I mostly use grated goat cheese. And always raw, please! Pasteurized cheese is no cheese at all.I like parmesan, I just don't think of using it. I love gorgonzola and mascarpone, as well as the mixture of both - I think it's called gorgonzola e mascarpone in Italy. In France we call it "magor".

Emmental or gruyere mixed with tomato sauce and put on pasta? Really? They don't really think that's Italian pasta do they?

Sorry. I don't want to sound rude, but I can't even imagine it. Not that I don't like both cheeses, because I do.

Anyway, if anyone wants to know how to make Southern Italian pasta dishes, or any Southern Italian dishes, for that matter, you can go to youtube and look up "Laura in the Kitchen-Italian recipes". They're basic, not necessarily exactly how I make even the southern ones, but they're good, especially for people who aren't used to cooking "Italian". She also has recipes for lots of "American" food. Lovely young woman; she gives me hope for the future. :)
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Laura+Vitale-Italian+recipes

Another one is this sweet old Italian-American grandmother whose son in law videos her making Southern Italian-American classics. She's adorable.

Here, for example, she shows how to make baked ziti, or pasta al forno in Italian. It's approximately my Neapolitan grandmother in laws recipe except she never put peas or hard boiled eggs and neither do I. Baked peas have no taste and I see no point in mucking it up with hard boiled eggs. The recipe amounts are below the video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AnyNZM1X73w

Be advised she has "Americanized" some recipes. There is absolutely no "Fettuccini Alfredo" like that in Italy where you dump in cream.

TardisBlue
26-07-19, 21:20
Emmental or gruyere mixed with tomato sauce and put on pasta? Really? They don't really think that's Italian pasta do they?

Sorry. I don't want to sound rude, but I can't even imagine it. Not that I don't like both cheeses, because I do.

I can imagine it very well ;-) It's a regular, popular dish in France, it's not haute cuisine and it doesn't claim to be Italian, or maybe just remotely. It's just the stuff you cook for a quick meal when you don't have much time. Kids love it. No we don't call that Italian pasta, just ptes au fromage/gruyre (with or without tomato sauce, and often with butter), or gratin de macaroni.

NB: The Gratin de macaroni is a bit more elaborate - it's a proper recipe in France, made with cream, gruyre or emmental, olive oil, a bit of garlic and a pinch of nutmeg. Very nice!

https://i.ibb.co/2YM2Qyz/362550-5839864485.jpg

Salento
26-07-19, 22:17
Home made pasta with fresh tomato sauce and Pecorino, Primitivo del Salento, and Pizzo (Bread baked with black olives, onion and tomato) 👍

https://i.imgur.com/OhFMTMm.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/verZALZ.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/Q4a3Etb.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/E3MAPGv.jpg


Discovered in Salento: Roman Era HUGE Wine container (Dolia) and amphorae

2000 years later we use Gas Station style Wine Station LOL

https://i.imgur.com/Jid7zY1.jpg

Angela
26-07-19, 23:00
I can imagine it very well ;-) It's a regular, popular dish in France, it's not haute cuisine and it doesn't claim to be Italian, or maybe just remotely. It's just the stuff you cook for a quick meal when you don't have much time. Kids love it. No we don't call that Italian pasta, just p�tes au fromage/gruy�re (with or without tomato sauce, and often with butter), or gratin de macaroni.

NB: The Gratin de macaroni is a bit more elaborate - it's a proper recipe in France, made with cream, gruy�re or emmental, olive oil, a bit of garlic and a pinch of nutmeg. Very nice!

https://i.ibb.co/2YM2Qyz/362550-5839864485.jpg

Now, I get it. :) Yummy.

That gratin de macaroni looks absolutely delicious. We add nutmeg to creamy, cheesy sauces too. I'm going to look for a recipe.

TardisBlue
26-07-19, 23:13
Here's the translation of a recipe I found online (automatic translator). There are probably variations:

250 g macaroni
150 g Gruyre or Emmental cheese
40 cl of liquid cream (preferably heavy cream)
2 cloves of garlic
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
Salt, pepper


Boil a large pot of salted water. Plunge the macaroni in it. Mix well and, when boiling again, cook for the time indicated on the pasta package. In the meantime....


Preparation of the scented cream: peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them (using a garlic press or chop them finely). In a skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat. When hot, add garlic and saut while stirring for 1 to 2 minutes. The garlic must not be coloured. Add the cream, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and remove from heat. Add 2/3 of the grated cheese and let it melt, while stirring.


Once the macaroni are "al dente", drain them. Pour the macaroni into the garlic and Gruyre cream. Mix well and let cool for about half an hour (the pasta will absorb the sauce) or cover the dish with cling film before continuing the recipe.


To finish up…


Before tasting.... When the sauce is well absorbed, preheat the oven to 240C (thermostat 8) for at least 10 minutes. Butter a large gratin dish and pour the pasta and sauce into it. Cover with the remaining grated cheese and bake for 5 minutes.

Angela
26-07-19, 23:39
Here's the translation of a recipe I found online (automatic translator). There are probably variations:

250 g macaroni
150 g Gruy�re or Emmental cheese
40 cl of liquid cream (preferably heavy cream)
2 cloves of garlic
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
Salt, pepper


Boil a large pot of salted water. Plunge the macaroni in it. Mix well and, when boiling again, cook for the time indicated on the pasta package. In the meantime....


Preparation of the scented cream: peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them (using a garlic press or chop them finely). In a skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat. When hot, add garlic and saut� while stirring for 1 to 2 minutes. The garlic must not be coloured. Add the cream, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and remove from heat. Add 2/3 of the grated cheese and let it melt, while stirring.


Once the macaroni are "al dente", drain them. Pour the macaroni into the garlic and Gruy�re cream. Mix well and let cool for about half an hour (the pasta will absorb the sauce) or cover the dish with cling film before continuing the recipe.


To finish up…


Before tasting.... When the sauce is well absorbed, preheat the oven to 240�C (thermostat 8) for at least 10 minutes. Butter a large gratin dish and pour the pasta and sauce into it. Cover with the remaining grated cheese and bake for 5 minutes.

Thanks, Tardis! I'm definitely making this. :)

Salento
26-07-19, 23:57
Generally the “Base Sauce” of all Gratinati is Beciamella (NO Cream), I Think.

If you bake use beciamella, if not (stove top) use cream.

Angela
27-07-19, 05:30
Generally the “Base Sauce” of all Gratinati is Beciamella (NO Cream), I Think.

If you bake use beciamella, if not (stove top) use cream.

That's the Italian take on it.

My father's mother (Emilian from the Apennines) made a lot of "stove top" cream sauces. Of course, there were more cows than people there. :) I'm not really crazy about most of them because they're usually quite bland. I do like tagliolini con crema di tartufo, or even just wild mushrooms.

I'm not a fan at all of the far northern Italian cream sauces with ham and peas and things like that.

Salento
27-07-19, 05:57
That's the Italian take on it.

My father's mother (Emilian from the Apennines) made a lot of "stove top" cream sauces. Of course, there were more cows than people there. :) I'm not really crazy about most of them because they're usually quite bland. I do like tagliolini con crema di tartufo, or even just wild mushrooms.

I'm not a fan at all of the far northern Italian cream sauces with ham and peas and things like that.

I saw a Chef making Pappardelle with a mix-mushrooms sauce with cream for a wedding, he cooked the Sauce at very low heat for hours (huge pot and never ending stirring). It was very good :)

Angela
27-07-19, 15:02
I saw a Chef making Pappardelle with a mix-mushrooms sauce with cream for a wedding, he cooked the Sauce at very low heat for hours (huge pot and never ending stirring). It was very good :)


This is the way we make it. We put it on gnocchi, and, of course, polenta! :)
https://i.imgur.com/ZSzBpH1.png

I never order something like this in restaurants here in America, not even Italian ones. They never got the concept that "sauce", of whatever kind, is supposed to "dress" pasta, not drown it.


It's not that I don't like "white" pastas, because I do. I love them.

Salsa di noci:
https://www.globeholidays.net/Europe/Italy/Liguria/Media/Liguria_Salsa_di_Noci_5.jpg
Ravioli with butter and sage:

http://static.squarespace.com/static/5036856ae4b02f1c1cc9ce01/t/52d42d1ae4b01daac311d3de/1389636892536/ravioli%20sage%20butter.jpg

Faunus
27-07-19, 15:20
Parmesan. Sheep cheese is good aswell. Mozzarella would be the best but lactose intollerance makes it too painful.

Stuvanè
28-07-19, 11:48
Beyond individual taste, much depends on the type of recipe and how much you want to be faithful to traditions. In my home, for recipes with puff pastry, tagliatelle, cappelletti or passatelli in broth and obviously for risottos, Parmesan (or Grana Padano in second choice) is a must.
For other recipes, however, Parmesan or Grana may not be suitable (or not sufficient on their own). For example, the "pizzoccheri" of Valtellina, which are a specialty from northern Lombardy (boiled buckwheat scraps, then cooked and seasoned with garlic, butter, cabbage and potatoes) require a creaming with Parmesan cheese but mostly from Casera, a semi-fat cheese typical of the valley, semi-cooked and semi-hard, of cow's milk. (It is also used for the "sciatt" dough, precisely small balls of Casera cheese battered with 00 flour and again with buckwheat, then fried in a pan.)
If you cross the northern Apennines, as you go through central Italy, especially in the interior of Tuscany, Marche, Umbria and Lazio, Grana and Parmigiano progressively give way to Pecorino cheese (of which there are a thousand variations, more or less seasoned, more or less tasty and spicy) which is actually required to cook decently pasta recipes like Carbonara, Gricia, Amatriciana.
There are also first courses that may require less obvious combinations, but very successful. The so-called "smoke and champagne" risotto was conceived probably about 50 years ago in Milan by chef Pino Capogna and was made known to the public by Ugo Tognazzi in his famous book. It combines northern and southern culinary traditions: in fact it's a parmesan risotto, simmered with champagne (or more modest sparkling wine / brut), in whose creaming, in addition to the Parmesan cheese, there must be some diced smoked Provola, a small milk cheese vaccine, of spun paste exposed to the smoke of straw, which is a dairy specialty originating from Campania :)

Angela
28-07-19, 15:05
Beyond individual taste, much depends on the type of recipe and how much you want to be faithful to traditions. In my home, for recipes with puff pastry, tagliatelle, cappelletti or passatelli in broth and obviously for risottos, Parmesan (or Grana Padano in second choice) is a must.
For other recipes, however, Parmesan or Grana may not be suitable (or not sufficient on their own). For example, the "pizzoccheri" of Valtellina, which are a specialty from northern Lombardy (boiled buckwheat scraps, then cooked and seasoned with garlic, butter, cabbage and potatoes) require a creaming with Parmesan cheese but mostly from Casera, a semi-fat cheese typical of the valley, semi-cooked and semi-hard, of cow's milk. (It is also used for the "sciatt" dough, precisely small balls of Casera cheese battered with 00 flour and again with buckwheat, then fried in a pan.)
If you cross the northern Apennines, as you go through central Italy, especially in the interior of Tuscany, Marche, Umbria and Lazio, Grana and Parmigiano progressively give way to Pecorino cheese (of which there are a thousand variations, more or less seasoned, more or less tasty and spicy) which is actually required to cook decently pasta recipes like Carbonara, Gricia, Amatriciana.
There are also first courses that may require less obvious combinations, but very successful. The so-called "smoke and champagne" risotto was conceived probably about 50 years ago in Milan by chef Pino Capogna and was made known to the public by Ugo Tognazzi in his famous book. It combines northern and southern culinary traditions: in fact it's a parmesan risotto, simmered with champagne (or more modest sparkling wine / brut), in whose creaming, in addition to the Parmesan cheese, there must be some diced smoked Provola, a small milk cheese vaccine, of spun paste exposed to the smoke of straw, which is a dairy specialty originating from Campania :)

That's a great explanation so that people understand that Italian cooking is not about just one cheese.

As I said above, probably partly because the Lunigiana is suspended between Emilia and Toscana, for things like fillings for pasta or stuffed veal breast, even stuffed mushrooms, my mother always mixed Parmigiano and our own Pecorino. I do think it also had to do with her sense of taste, as she thought it just tasted better, as do I. On the pasta itself, though, it was always grated Parmigiano.

I'm also one of those people who love recipes like Carbonara, Gricia and Amatriciana, and I think they'd be spoiled if you didn't use Pecorino. Also, one of my favorites is cacio e pepe...such a deceptively simple recipe but so difficult to do correctly...absolutely no cream, yet look how creamy and silky.

https://talesofambrosia.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/cacio-e-pepe-4.jpg

Maybe you have to grow up with more strongly flavored cheeses to appreciate them. I've heard Americans call some French and Italian cheeses "stinky", or Pecorino "funky". I call them delicious. :)