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Tokis-Phoenix
29-03-06, 18:57
Just a curiosity thread, what sort of diet do you have? I was thinking the other day, although Ifm an omnivore/meat and plant eater, I rarely ever eat meat (maybe once a month or less), the only meat I eat though is beef or fish (no poultry meat) and very rarely pork.
It started when I gave up eating battery/intensively/barn farmed animal products including non-organic ones as well, partly for reasons concerning morality and partly for reasons concerning health, as I didnft think those types of foods were very healthy to consume/eat. Its ended up with me eating practically no meat at all as those types of foods are hard to come by where I live. Ah well. Ifm happy though with my diet currently meat-wise, although I often miss a lot of types of things though (baconc gdroolshc), I would like to cut down on a lot of the sweets I taken to eating recently thoughc

So do you eat meat, and do you follow any particular form of diet and are you happy with your diet as it stands currently?

Tokis-Phoenix
29-03-06, 19:04
Oh and just the for the sake of those who don't know what macrobiotic diets or lacto-ovo vegetarians are etc, here are the basic definitions;

Flexitarian/Semi-Vegetarians
Semi-vegetarians eat no red or white meat (beef, pork, venison, etc). The only animals that semi-vegetarians eat are fowl and fish. (Purists would say that semi-vegetarians are not vegetarians at all, but I have included them in order to show the complete hierarchy.)

Pescatarian(also spelled pescetarian)
The word gpescatarianh is occasionally used to describe those who abstain from eating all meat and animal flesh with the exception of fish. Although the word is not commonly used, more and more people are adopting this kind of diet, usually for health reasons or as a stepping stone to a fully vegetarian diet.

Lacto Ovo Vegetarian
A lacto ovo vegetarian does not eat meat, fish or poultry, but eats eggs and milk. They eat eggs and products made with eggs in them, yogurt, cheese, milk and ice creams.

Lacto Vegetarian
A lacto vegetarian does not eat meat, fish, poultry or eggs, but includes dairy products in their diet. They will eat milk, ice cream (that does not include eggs), yogurt and cheese. They would avoid ice creams, baked goods, pancakes and veggie burgers that contain eggs.

Vegan
A vegan does not eat any fish, meat, poultry, eggs, dairy products or foods that contain any of these products. They also do not use any non-food items that contain products from animals, including wool from sheep, leather and silk. Vegans often do not eat honey, because bees may be killed while harvesting it.
According to many vegans, it is pronounced VEE-gun. A vegan diet consists of vegetables, grains, beans, nuts, fruits and seeds. This diet tends to be high in fiber and moderate in protein and fat.
A vegan will not use margarine that has casein, a milk product, in it and they do not use shoes that are made from leather. Vegans do not eat white granulated sugar because it is often processed by using char derived from animal bones to whiten the sugar. They also do not use products that are tested on animals, as are many cosmetics.

Macrobiotics
A macrobiotic diet is mainly vegetarian, but macrobiotic diets often include seafood. In this diet all other meat products are excluded, as are eggs and dairy products. They also do not eat "nightshade vegetables" (potato, pepper and eggplant), refined sugar and tropical fruits. This diet contains many foods found in Asian countries such as miso soup, root vegetables (daikon and lotus) and sea vegetables (seaweed, kelp, arame).
It emphasizes eating locally grown foods that are in season. Meals consist of 50% to 60% grains, 25% locally grown produce, and the rest of the diet mainly consists of beans and soups. In lesser amounts fruits, nuts and seeds are eaten.
This diet is based on the Chinese principles of yin and yang. Some people follow this diet as a philosophy of life and others follow it for health reasons.

Fruitarian
A fruitarian is a person who only eats fruits and vegetables that are actually classified as fruits such as avocados, nuts, seeds, eggplant, zucchini and tomatoes.

Raw or Living Food Diet
One who follows a raw food diet is a person who for the most part only eats raw foods that are not cooked. One who follows this type of diet believes that cooking changes food in a negative way and makes it less nutritious, diminishing the vitamin and mineral contents of the food. Most people who follow a raw-food diet only eat between 50% to 80% of their food raw. There is some logic to a raw food diet in the fact that cooking food destroys nutrients. But cooking food on the other hand makes foods easier to digest, which often offsets the anti-nutritional factors.

No-name
29-03-06, 19:13
I'm not a vegetarian, but I really can't eat red meat at all.

I eat almost everything I can get my teeth around, but it works out to very little meat at all. (I had a cheeseburger yesterday, and it was the first beef in a couple of weeks.) I eat fish or chicken almost every day, and stay away from sugar, and fat. Most of this is because of health issues and the information my HMO dietician has given me. (Due to diet related 40 year old health problems and a genetic anemia that leaves me prone to having too much iron.) I also eat eggs and cheese, but no milk or ice cream... I will drink soy milk.

I'm unhappy when I want dessert and can't have it, chocolate... or a rare steak.

Mitsuo
29-03-06, 19:21
I am a huge meat eater. I love it. Everyday I have some type of meat.

I have to watch the soda though, when it comes to my diet. Soda contains Phosphorus and if your phosphorus level is too high then your calcium is taken from the bones to even it out. Which could lead to osteoporosis. Overall, I have a healthy diet. I don't deprive myself of anything, I eat my fruits and vegies, and I get out and exercise a lot. I just watch the sugar intake. I don't have a specific diet though. Just eat normally and exercise regularly.

Thor
30-03-06, 14:49
I like eating beef, fish, and chicken. I despise hamburgers, and ground beef. I could imagine living without them, but I really would prefer to keep eating them. Diabetes runs in my family, so I have to watch my sugar intake. I don't want to be 30-40 years old with diabetes.

No-name
30-03-06, 16:12
Pepsi...I miss colas. I havent had soda in four months...And the diet ones leave a metalic afteraste...

Da Monstar
30-03-06, 16:26
As I say; All the meat you can eat!

Mycernius
30-03-06, 16:31
Regular meat eater here, although I don't eat pork as I don't like it. A big fish eater as well. In fact I'll ty practically anything. The only thing I really watch diet wise is salt because I do not like salty food, and anything with caffine in. Because I stopped drinking coke, I don't really drink pop anymore, just water a fruit juice.

moffeltoff
30-03-06, 16:31
Sometimes I dont eat any meat at all and sometimes I enjoy meat a lot especialle ,when its raw mjam mjam^^:cool:

Tsuyoiko
30-03-06, 16:39
I am a lacto-ovo vegetarian. I would like to be a vegan, but I don't have the imagination or will-power to succeed at it. I just can't give up sour cream! I do eat vegan quite often though - probably about 5 meals a week. For lunch today I had lemon and coriander cous-cous with chunky vegetables and chick peas roasted in olive oil - so vegan food isn't boring, as I know a lot of people think! I haven't eaten any meat for nearly 16 years, but even before then I didn't eat a lot. Apart from not liking the idea of eating a dead animal, I never much liked the taste.

In general, I try to eat healthily most of the time. I make sure there is some protein in each meal, and I don't add salt to anything (except chips!). I don't often drink sugary drinks or coffee - I prefer water and fruit tea. I do like beer though. My biggest weakness is probably that I drink alcohol everyday - just the one pint on weekdays, but that probably adds up to too much overall :(

Tokis-Phoenix
30-03-06, 17:13
Hmm...Things i'd like to change about my diet in general are;
a. Completely give up pork. No more piggies for me. I love the taste of the meat and all the forms it comes in, but i don't really like the idea of eating an animal that is so intelligent(more intelligent than a dog), its a shame its farmed at all really.
b. Cut down on salt and sugar- i consume a huge amount of salt and sugar, most of the sugar i take goes into the vast quantities of tea i drink every day(i have on average around 4-6 mugs of tea a day, each with 2 teaspoons of sugar, as it can add up to a lot of sugar a day), and the salt goes into practically every meal i have, mostly salads though(i have pretty knackered taste buds, i'm the only person i know who eats raw chilli's pickled in vinegar and brine water for snacks :relief: :blush: ).
c. Cut down on chocolate...I've even cut out chocolate completely in the past, but i always find myself going back to it. Part of the reason why i want to cut down on or cut out chocolate is because although my complexion is perfect at the mo, its very volatile, and i find eating too much of things like cake, cheese, cream and chocolate can give me spots, which i hate :( . I also don't really do excercise, so i eat according to how much energy i burn a day(which isn't a lot considering most things i do involve sitting down i.e. art & writing- my twice weekly fish tank cleaning session is about as close as i get to excercise, often involves lugging 40 ten litre buckets of water back and forth- i have very big fish tanks :bluush: ).
Man...I really should get a gym pass/membership card :relief: ...

Rich303
30-03-06, 17:33
I saw a cool thing on TV once with Rastafarian poet/legend Benjamin Zephaniah and he showed the huge range of things vegans can eat, and trying to show some of the nice things you don't have to miss out on. Also, being vegan doesn't always mean you are pale and thin. I have a vegan friend and he is a big, strapping guy!

I don't think I could be vegan, though.
Personally, I eat some meat and I am eating more fish than I used to (especially since I got into Sushi and Sashimi)

I eat lots of fruit. Most week days I have bananas, oranges, berries, or plums. Usually about five pieces a day + a pure fruit or yogurt based smoothie.

I usually have a bag of (unsalted) mixed nuts on the go as well , for when I get peckish,

I try to drink water instead of fizzy or sugary drinks.

Overall I eat well, but I ruin it by drinking a little too much, and smoking.

KrazyKat
30-03-06, 17:43
I would say that I'm vegan, but thats not completely true becuase I'm not so fussy, I make exceptions especially when going on holiday or eating at certain restaurants. Of course, I would still stay vegetarian then. When I'm just cooking for myself at home its no problem though, it just means no pizza or cheese sandwhiches. Vegan for about 1 year, vegetarian a couple before that.

Tokis-Phoenix
30-03-06, 17:58
I would like to eat more sushi and sashimi, i don't think i've ever encountered some i didn't like(although i have to admit i don't really dig the types with fish eggs in, but they still generally taste good), but where i live its very difficult to get hold of and often insanely expensive- i did buy a sushi making kit and a book on how to make sushi, but i still havn't managed to find any of the seaweed you use in making sushi, and my fav types of sushi often involve seaweed and and pickled ginger("drools"...) :relief: .
Some of my fav dishes/meals include tuna pasta bake, sausages and mashed potatoe (with onion gravy of course), traditional english beef sunday roast (with all the extras), too many pasta dishes to name, sushi and sashimi (of course), wonton soup, veg tempura, fish & chips, rice pudding etc etc...Man, i'm making myself feel hungry now :blush: ! I've always wanted to try some of the ramen dishes out there though, i've heard they are delicious/very addictive :ramen: :gohan: .

Rich303
30-03-06, 18:17
I would like to eat more sushi and sashimi, i don't think i've ever encountered some i didn't like(although i have to admit i don't really dig the types with fish eggs in, but they still generally taste good), but where i live its very difficult to get hold of and often insanely expensive
Yes, that is the trouble with Sushi outside Japan.
Sometimes it is hard to find or can be expensive. I'm lucky that I work in London and there is more about, but I can only go to have Sushi in a restaurant occasionally, as a treat. The local does a set special for around 14 pounds, which isn't too bad, but add drinks and it's more like 20 pounds
You wouldnt see many Sushi restaurants where I live though, the demand is just not there.

Tokis-Phoenix
30-03-06, 18:41
Yes, that is the trouble with Sushi outside Japan.
Sometimes it is hard to find or can be expensive. I'm lucky that I work in London and there is more about, but I can only go to have Sushi in a restaurant occasionally, as a treat. The local does a set special for around £14, which isn't too bad, but add drinks and it's more like £20.
You wouldnt see many Sushi restaurants where I live though, the demand is just not there.

The only place i know of where i can get sushi is Waitrose, but its pretty expensive place to go food shopping- usually a 8inch long and around 4inch wide pack of sushi costs around 10's :shock: . So as you can guess, i very rarely eat sushi, its more of a special occasion thing for me like its a treat thing for you. Ah well...Need more japanese people and health lovers to increase demand for japanese resturants! I don't have a single one near me, the closest i get to oriental/foriegn food near me usually consists of the kebab shop run by the indian guys, or the local chinese take away(their food can taste pretty bad though, most things consist of butchered chunks of stuff resembling a dead animal or plant of some sort saturated in super sugery, suspiciously bright radioactive-looking red sweat & sour sauce).

Thunderthief
30-03-06, 18:53
I love meat, im a part time butcher during the summer.

MeAndroo
31-03-06, 17:26
My diet at this point mainly consists of veggies and chicken/fish. I've started to avoid red meat and some processed carbs/grains. I've been focused mainly on a high-protein/high-fiber diet to help me win our office weight loss pool.

I used to eat just about everything, except for lamb. I never found it very appealing. I have no real moral issues with eating meat, but I've read enough to know why some people might.

Nicky
31-03-06, 18:31
I'm a pescy-tarian, formerly an Ovo Lacto vegetarian. No land meat for me.

Buckethead
31-03-06, 18:45
I eat meat all the time! Almost every day or two!

Silverbackman
05-04-06, 11:07
I love meat and eat it all the time in almost ever meal (except most breakfasts). There is nothing wrong with eating meat as we are an omnivorous species. However I do agree that if too much meat is taken without moderation it can potentially be bad for your health.

Another concern about eating meat is the concern about the animal being pumped with steroids or other harmful chemicals. However as we all know vegetables from the market would be subject to the same chemical treatment regardless.

Meat is important to our diet regardless. Most evolutionary biologists and anthropologist agree that meat is what made us evolve big brains. Meat is brain food and can be highly nutritious.

Reiku
05-04-06, 12:24
My only real code of diet is: "If it doesn't taste good, don't eat it again."

I don't really have the money to eat as healthily as I'd like--subsisting primarily on instant ramens--but I try to boost that up with meat and vegetables as much as possible.

A major risk that anyone considering a vegitarian diet should be aware of, is vitamin B-12 deficiency. While proteins, iron, and other nutrients found in meat can often be obtained from plants as well, just about the only viable source for B-12 other than meat is seaweed.

I found this out after a medicine I was taking caused a condition where my body could not absorb B-12 from the food I ate. I developed a severe B-12 deficiency, and the first thing my doctor asked me after seeing the results of te blood test was: "Are you vegitarian?"

Since my response was shocked silence while I tried to wrap my brain around the idea of anyone mistaking me for a vegitarian, the doctor explained to me that B-12 deficiency is very common amoung vegitarians because it is primarily found only in animal products.

In case you're wondering vitamin B-12 does, it is a critical nutrient required by the brain, and B-12 deficiency can cause severe impairment to cognitive funtions--most noticably to memory.

I actually have permanent damage to my short term memory from my exteneded battle with B-12 deficiency, and would suggest that anyone pursuing a diet that requires them to cut out something their bodies are intended to eat be very careful not to remove any vital nutrients from their diet in the process.

Tokis-Phoenix
05-04-06, 13:57
I agree with Reiku, although in some respects a vegetarian diet can be very healthy, its only good for you if you know your RDA(recommended daily amount) of various vitamins, minerals and fats etc and you know which foods to obtain these things from. Human beings were not evolved to thrive on a vegetarian diet, many things in our body point to this from our stomaches, our teeth, our eyes etc- so if you want to go vegetarian for whatever reasons you need to find ways of keeping a fulfilling nutritional diet without the foods you'd usually be advised to eat like fish, red & white meat, eggs, dairy products etc.
There are many B vitamins, B12 is not the most vital or important one but is still just as important as any other B vitamin- this link has an interesting report on B12 and the dangers of not getting enough of it and so forth;

http://www.berkeleywellness.com/html/ds/dsVitaminB12.php

Eat a fulfilling diet everyone :cool: !

KrazyKat
05-04-06, 14:09
A major risk that anyone considering a vegitarian diet should be aware of, is vitamin B-12 deficiency. While proteins, iron, and other nutrients found in meat can often be obtained from plants as well, just about the only viable source for B-12 other than meat is seaweed.


Actually, vegetarians don't have a problem with B12 because its found in dairy products (milk yogurt etc), its vegans who have to watch out for it.
B12 is found in other non-animal products apart from seaweed, notably marmite and soymilk.

By the way, do you have marmite over there in the US? I have a feeling that you don't, but then you would all be missing out. :-)

Reiku
05-04-06, 14:50
Well, we have just about everything here, food wise--one of the advantages of being a mongrel culture--but some things you have to look for. I'm not familliar with marmite, so I'd guess it's one of those things you have to look for.

Also, I really think the whole vegitarian/vegan thing is a bit stupid. "Vegitarian" means you only eat plants--but for some reason a large number of hippie-minded humans decided to try it and couldn't commit, so now we call true vegitarians "vegans" and those that still consume dairy products are "vegitarians"?

I hate being from a country that isn't fluent with it's primary language. :rolleyes:

strongvoicesforward
05-04-06, 17:53
Also, I really think the whole vegitarian/vegan thing is a bit stupid.lol. I guess the Dalai Lama and A. Einstein are/were stupid, too, then. I prefer their company and opinion on the matter.
"Vegitarian" means you only eat plants--but for some reason a large number of hippie-minded humans decided to try it and couldn't commit, so now we call true vegitarians "vegans" and those that still consume dairy products are "vegitarians"?
The hippie subculture is virtually gone. I can`t remember the last time I have seen a psychodelic mini van driving around with long haired guitar playing people. The term now is used pajoratively and without any accuracy. Get with the times and your arguments, too, will benefit!

But perhaps people do consider the Dalai Lama and Einstein hippies. After all, the former seems to not have a real job, and the latter did have kind of long freaky hair.
lol. <snicker>

Tsuyoiko
06-04-06, 13:53
lol. I guess the Dalai Lama and A. Einstein are/were stupid, too, then. I prefer their company and opinion on the matter.The statement above is in response to a totally unfair misquoting of Reiku. Going back to Reiku's post, that can be clearly seen. Reiku was not calling vegetarians stupid - he was referring to the terminology. Sorry to speak for you Reiku, but I wanted to point that out straightaway.
Also, I really think the whole vegitarian/vegan thing is a bit stupid. "Vegitarian" means you only eat plants--but for some reason a large number of hippie-minded humans decided to try it and couldn't commit, so now we call true vegitarians "vegans" and those that still consume dairy products are "vegitarians"?I agree Reiku, logically speaking a vegetarian is someone who only eats plants. But if you look at the etymology of the word 'vegetarian' it has always included dairy products. So, it didn't happen in the way you describe. The term 'vegetarian (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=vegetarian)' dates from at least 1839, and as can be seen from the history of The Vegetarian Society (http://www.vegsoc.org/news/2000/21cv/history.html), it originally meant 'abstinence from eating flesh'. Originally, vegans (http://www.vegansociety.com/html/about_us/history/) were called 'non-dairy vegetarians'.

strongvoicesforward
06-04-06, 15:59
Originally Posted by strongvoicesforward:
lol. I guess the Dalai Lama and A. Einstein are/were stupid, too, then. I prefer their company and opinion on the matter.


The statement above is in response to a totally unfair misquoting of Reiku.

I disagree.

He clearly said "the wholevegetarian/vegan thing is stupid." I am going by what I am reading, and if he meant what you think he means then I think a clearer way to have written it would not have been in the all inclusive manner in which he unmistakably wrote it in. If the meaning for what you think it is was meant, how hard would it have been to write, "I think the use of the words vegetarian/vegan is stupid." That is clearly qualified and exclusive in scope. Now, if that is what he meant, then I will accept that. But, I am not clairvoyant and I am not into guessing at what people really mean when the qualify things with extreme and exclusive terminology (i.e. "the whole").


Also, I really think the whole vegitarian/vegan thing is a bit stupid. "Vegitarian" means you only eat plants--but for some reason a large number of hippie-minded humans decided to try it and couldn't commit, so now we call true vegitarians "vegans" and those that still consume dairy products are "vegitarians"?

He further clouds the meaning (innacurate may I add) by referring to a cultural subgroup (i.e. the hippie) as being responsible for the confusion in terminology. You may want to resurrect his passage, Tsuyoiko by explaining it, but it is a passage made with error and lack of clarity. Maybe Reiku himself would like to say, "Vegetarians/Vegans, and the practice of these dietary habits are not stupid." I would welcome that statement from him for the clarity that it is and that would go to mitigate his extremen and absolutist statement above.


Going back to Reiku's post, that can be clearly seen. Reiku was not calling vegetarians stupid - he was referring to the terminology.

I disagree. But, I am sure some others may pile on with you.

Tsuyoiko
06-04-06, 17:23
I guess we have to wait to hear from Reiku - but I think it would have been fairer to quote his statement in full.

strongvoicesforward
06-04-06, 17:39
I guess we have to wait to hear from Reiku - but I think it would have been fairer to quote his statement in full.

Even in its full form it is still unclear. In fact, his following sentences after the first one in that paragraph does nothing to take away from his absolutist statement on the matter because his error in referring to hippies is in itself wrong -- for hippies were not responsible (or I have never seen any studies saying they were) for the mix up in terminology of vegetarianism and veganism.

I don`t mind if he comes back and makes a revision. Fine. But what I said regarding that sentence and para of his was in no way unfair.

Mycernius
06-04-06, 18:00
No arguing, man. Let's just go hug a tree and, like, be cool man. Just remember the mantra
"We sow the seed. Nature grows the seed and we eat the seed, but then. This is the cool bit. We sow the seed. NATURE grows the seed and the WE eat the seed" (With apologies to Nigel Planer)

I love marmite, especially with cheese.

Revenant
06-04-06, 18:38
I eat what's put on the table, and usually that includes some sort of chicken, pork, or fish. The red meat and chicken I could do without, but I don't like the idea of giving up my pacific saury, salmon, and mackeral.

I thought the Dalai Lama preferred vegetarian, but understanding that meat was easier to put on the table than vegatarian food in Dharmasala, he would eat whatever meat was put before him.

strongvoicesforward
06-04-06, 19:06
I thought the Dalai Lama preferred vegetarian, but understanding that meat was easier to put on the table than vegatarian food in Dharmasala, he would eat whatever meat was put before him.

Hi Revenant,

As for the Dalai Lama on him being a vegetarian, look at a few of his quotes HERE. (http://www.eupedia.com/forum/showthread.php?p=329803#post329803)

Revenant
06-04-06, 19:20
At that time (1960s) he attempted to become vegetarian, but after contracting Hepititas, he was ordered by his doctors to eat meat again. There is something else mentioned of Tibet not being conducive to growing vegetables that he cited (I read that somewhere), but that the Tibetan practice is much like the Native American practice, and they take no more than what they need. Apparently he became vegetarian once again at the age of seventy.

strongvoicesforward
06-04-06, 19:25
Apparently he became vegetarian once again at the age of seventy.

Yes, and that is what he IS now, and he clearly relates that animal suffering is a part of that decision -- if not the main reason for doing so. Sometimes it may take years to become solid and strong on choices we know that are right. He is a human like all of us. Dithering and back sliding for various reasons affects us all.

The current and most latest decisions that we make and live by are what define us for our beliefs as to what we believe -- not past ones in the face of current ones.

Reiku
10-04-06, 09:23
The statement above is in response to a totally unfair misquoting of Reiku. Going back to Reiku's post, that can be clearly seen. Reiku was not calling vegetarians stupid - he was referring to the terminology. Sorry to speak for you Reiku, but I wanted to point that out straightaway.I agree Reiku, logically speaking a vegetarian is someone who only eats plants. But if you look at the etymology of the word 'vegetarian' it has always included dairy products. So, it didn't happen in the way you describe. The term 'vegetarian (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=vegetarian)' dates from at least 1839, and as can be seen from the history of The Vegetarian Society (http://www.vegsoc.org/news/2000/21cv/history.html), it originally meant 'abstinence from eating flesh'. Originally, vegans (http://www.vegansociety.com/html/about_us/history/) were called 'non-dairy vegetarians'.

Actually, I was refering to the use of the word "vegitarian" as it is used to describe the diets of various animal species, as I'm fairly certain this use came first.

The term "vegitarian" refers to a diet consisting only of plants--for example, cows have a vegitarian diet. At various points in history, omnivorus humans have decided to stop eating meat, and mistakenly refered to themselves as "vegitarians." This misuse of the word spread and eventually became a part of the lexicon.

I've found that many of the multiple--and often confusingly contradictory--definitions for words came about in this way: by a misuse of the word by those who didn't properly understand it's meaning becoming an acepted definition through common (mis) use.

As for the other things: I didn't feel like taking the time to "lawyerize" my post to prevent it's meaning and intent from being twisted in the way SVF chose to do--and I don't fel like taking the time now to dignify his (non) accusations. Despite my opinion of his beleifs, I doubt he is stupid enough to actually be confused by my previous post--he's just making things up to attack since he can't attack my actual statement.

strongvoicesforward
10-04-06, 09:39
LOL @ last paragraph above!

yukon
10-04-06, 10:17
The poll was a little different for me because I eat meat 3- days a week. Daily is not possible right now(no time.) Since I stay in India with my parents, I got to eat vegetarian food in the house. Cooking meat is forbidden but I can bring it from outside(sounds weird but that that's my father's logic.) While I was in the US, I used to cook and eat pretty much everything that americans eat. Beef, pork, seafood, poultry etc. Finding beef, pork and turkey(subway subs) is kinda difficult in india. So gotta stick with poultry and fish.

Pachipro
11-04-06, 00:41
Luckily, at 51, I have perfect health and since I started taking alot of vitimin suppliments about 13 years ago I have not been sick a single day. Not so much as a cold. This from a person who would get sick on a yearly basis years back.

I severely cut out all sugar and do not drink any kind of sugered soft drinks or diet soft drinks as I believe they truly are poison to the body. I also do not drink any dairy products, but I do have a weakness for cheese. I just take extra fiber when I eat cheese. I believe that if you keep the immune system healthy with suppliments, try to eat healthy, (as you cannot get any minerals and vitimins from processed foods these days) you will stay healthy in both mind and body.

My diet consists of mostly fish, poultry and vegetables, occasional meat and junk food, always with suppliments including fiber.

This does not mean that I live a bland lifestyle. I still smoke and drink alcohol, and eat the occasional pizza, cheese, junk food and meat. Just a few months ago I went for an MRI of the heart to determine if I had any clogged arteries or plaque build-up. My test was returned with zero plaque of the heart and it was stated that I had the heart of a 30 year old! Also, blood tests confirmed that my cholestoral was normal. I'd like to think it was because of the suppliments, but I do not believe in coincidences. So I will continue with my present diet and lifestyle for the time being.

Tokis-Phoenix
11-04-06, 15:31
Well done Pachipro on your diet :cool: - you must have a lot of self discipline to cut out all sugar, or at least thats the one i would find the most difficult personally. Which one did you find the most difficult to cut out of your diet?

ps: this thread is not about discussions of animal rights, politics, religeons or whatever etc (i know i'm no innocent in this sense, but i figured there are thousands of other threads about this kind of stuff, so if you feel the need to go off-topic or be sarcastic or whatever please do it on your own thread or wherever the thread owner doesn't mind ;) ).
Diets are very personal things and i don't think anyone here wants to feel their personal choices trodden on by a herd of activists or religeous preachers etc...This thread is not intended to be an opinion-bashing session.

Carlson
11-04-06, 16:14
if im hungry and there is meat to eat... well guess what i eat meat. thats my rule

Pachipro
11-04-06, 16:17
...you must have a lot of self discipline to cut out all sugar, or at least thats the one i would find the most difficult personally. Which one did you find the most difficult to cut out of your diet?
Most of the things I have cut out oir severely limited were difficult. I think ice creme was the most difficult.

It wasn't easy at first as I was a drinker of all kinds of soft drinks and ate candy and ice creme on a regular basis. Then I found out how bad and toxic to the body sugar (as well as milk) is and how addicting it is not mentally, but physically. The body begins to crave it much like heroin.

It is said that just 100mg of processed sugar severly impedes the immune system of the human body for a couple of hours in order for it to fight off the sugar. This leaves you open to other influences like colds and the flu, among other diseases. With all the sugar in soft drinks and candy the immune system is overwhelmed almost constantly if you consume them on a regular basis.

Once I found this out, and confirmed it with other sources, it was easy to give it up. I craved it for a while and slowly weaned myself off it. I just looked it as poison. This doesn't mean I do not drink the occassional Dr Pepper or eat chocolate once in a while, but it's no where near what I used to eat and drink. Now they are using High Fructose Corn Syrup in many drinks and, being cheaper than sugar, is just as bad.

Diet drinks are no better in that they use aspertame in most of them and that is more toxic to the body than sugar. Just do an internet search and you'll be amazed at what you find.

Diabetes and obesity is a severe problem here in the US especially among young children and there is now a "new" condition known as "pre-diabetes" (what a joke). The medical industry and the pharmaceuticals are making billions from diabetes when all parents have to do is severely cut out the sugar in their diets.

The medical profession as well as the FDA and others know how toxic sugar and aspertame is, but it is a worldwide multi-billion dollar industry, so they keep quiet. But the info is out there if you look for it.

yukon
17-04-06, 14:09
Can you detail out the vitamin supplements that you are taking? I stopped taking milk about 4 years back but I do eat milk products(curd, cheese, cottage cheese, etc.) I drink soft drinks once in 6 months or so. The use of high fructose corn syrup is not a minor cause of obesity and insulin intolerance in the US.
Is your diet a continuation of what you used to eat in japan before you left for the US?

Luckily, at 51, I have perfect health and since I started taking alot of vitimin suppliments about 13 years ago I have not been sick a single day. Not so much as a cold. This from a person who would get sick on a yearly basis years back.
I severely cut out all sugar and do not drink any kind of sugered soft drinks or diet soft drinks as I believe they truly are poison to the body. I also do not drink any dairy products, but I do have a weakness for cheese. I just take extra fiber when I eat cheese. I believe that if you keep the immune system healthy with suppliments, try to eat healthy, (as you cannot get any minerals and vitimins from processed foods these days) you will stay healthy in both mind and body.
My diet consists of mostly fish, poultry and vegetables, occasional meat and junk food, always with suppliments including fiber.
This does not mean that I live a bland lifestyle. I still smoke and drink alcohol, and eat the occasional pizza, cheese, junk food and meat. Just a few months ago I went for an MRI of the heart to determine if I had any clogged arteries or plaque build-up. My test was returned with zero plaque of the heart and it was stated that I had the heart of a 30 year old! Also, blood tests confirmed that my cholestoral was normal. I'd like to think it was because of the suppliments, but I do not believe in coincidences. So I will continue with my present diet and lifestyle for the time being.

No-name
17-04-06, 16:01
Educational tip:
Pre-Diabetes, or insulin resistance is a very very common affliction that hits most overweight, middle aged Americans (like me) who drank too much pepsi, ate too much chocolate and trained our body to ignore insulin with fast food. The range for Pre-Diabetes is a fasting blood sugar of 100-125 mg/dl or an A1C of between 7 and 8%. Anything above those numbers is Type II diabetes.

Everyone 40 or older or 20% overweight or more should have a blood test for fasting blood sugar and A1c. A1c measures the percentage of hemoglobin that has glucose attached to it. The higher the percentage, the higher your average blood sugar over a three month period (the average life of a red blood cell).

Since cutting down my sugar almost four months ago, I have lost 30 pounds and my blood sugar and blood pressure are under control. I also visited a dietician and nurse every week for a month to come up with my "eating plan." Which I try to stick to. Although I had cut out fat and salt a long time ago, the portion sizes of what I was eating was way too large and sugar or corn syrup was in much of what I was eating.

I would still recommend that you stop smoking though... your diet is pretty worthless if you die of cancer or emphasema.

Tsuyoiko
18-04-06, 12:45
I need to lose some weight - about 10 pounds to a stone. Considering that I am vegetarian and absolutely useless at self denial, does anyone have any tips?

heliobacter
18-04-06, 14:06
i guess i'm rather 'old-school' when it comes to my diet...
i'm trying to stick to things we've learned in school, like
http://www.kidskonnect.com/FoodPyramid/FoodPyrgraph.jpg
the biggest problem with my diet is surely coffee. i drink about 3-4 cups every day, especially in the morning. otherwise, i wouldn't be able to get out of bed. :sleep:
i'm glad i gave up smoking, in the end, when i smoked about half a pack a day, i really felt bad. haven't smoked a cigarette for about 1 1/2 yrs now (maybe one time when i was drunk, but i don't remember)

... You wouldnt see many Sushi restaurants where I live though, the demand is just not there.
i don't know much about 'authentic' sushi, but even in my - pretty agricultural - area, there's a demand. in my 15 000 ppl 'city', some japanese people run a sushi restaurant, and they've got a lotta customers every day. for most of the people here, it's truly extravagant, the food aswell as the show cooking. but i know, things in london are a little different :blush:

... By the way, do you have marmite over there in the US? I have a feeling that you don't, but then you would all be missing out. :-)
JUST DON'T TRY :85:

nurizeko
18-04-06, 14:50
I put Eat meat almost daily because i eat what i want, when i want, or whats given to me, and it ussually has meat somewhere in there.

I love Haggis, but i dont get it often.

Tokis-Phoenix
18-04-06, 18:24
I need to lose some weight - about 10 pounds to a stone. Considering that I am vegetarian and absolutely useless at self denial, does anyone have any tips?

What sort of vegetarian are you?

Tsuyoiko
19-04-06, 11:00
What sort of vegetarian are you?Ovo-lacto. I try to eat vegan as much as possible.

Index
19-04-06, 11:33
I'm on the Atkins diet. It's pretty easy as I can still eat most of the things I like like meat, fish, cheese. It was hard to give up bread at first but now I am used to it. I miss pierogi too, and sushi (but sashimi is ok).

Reiku
19-04-06, 11:38
Try working out. Doesn't have to be anything fancy, but just a slight increase in your daily physical activity can help you drop weight fairly quickly. Maybe take up jogging or just park your car a block or two from your destination and walk the rest of the way. The most importaint thing is to not overdo it though, the reason most weight-loss plans fail is because the person tries to push themselves too hard or lose weight too fast--causing a natural rebound where you end up binging and putting all the weight back on. Just take it slow and gradual and you'd be suprised how easy it is.

Tsuyoiko
19-04-06, 11:53
Thanks for the advice Reiku - I think I'll opt for the exercise bike, then I can read at the same time :blush:

Index - it's nice to see you! I hope the diet works for you, but I have heard some negative things about it. Here's some info:

A couple of balanced assessments: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/92/101979.htm
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2004/atkinstrans.shtml

An anti-Atkins site: http://www.atkinsexposed.org/

Index
19-04-06, 12:13
Thanks Tsuyoiko. I have heard things too, both bad and good. Just a matter of keeping an eye on everything I think, to make sure I don't get sick. I don't plan on staying on the first phase for years to come anyway.

As an aside, I've noticed some anti-Atkins writers claim that Atkins recommended gorging yourself and eating unlimited amounts of eggs, meat etc. That is not true though, he recommended eating just the amont to feel satifsifed but not stuffed. As one of the links you put up points out (and something I have found), the diet suppresses your appetite, so you are unlikely to overeat, or let alone gorge yourself. Each to their own though, it's easy enough to get on a diet and then get checkup with your doctor to make sure everything is regular.

Tokis-Phoenix
19-04-06, 16:33
Thanks Tsuyoiko. I have heard things too, both bad and good. Just a matter of keeping an eye on everything I think, to make sure I don't get sick. I don't plan on staying on the first phase for years to come anyway.
As an aside, I've noticed some anti-Atkins writers claim that Atkins recommended gorging yourself and eating unlimited amounts of eggs, meat etc. That is not true though, he recommended eating just the amont to feel satifsifed but not stuffed. As one of the links you put up points out (and something I have found), the diet suppresses your appetite, so you are unlikely to overeat, or let alone gorge yourself. Each to their own though, it's easy enough to get on a diet and then get checkup with your doctor to make sure everything is regular.

I think the theory behind the atkins diet was that protein is a hunger supressant and also good for giving you lots of long term energy- so with a high protein diet you would feel less hungry and put on less weight.
With such a diet though you must keep a steady eye on nutrition though as it cuts out a lot of food sources.
I take it you are on the atkins diet for weight loss? Is it good?

Index
19-04-06, 16:58
It seems to be working, but I haven't paid a huge amount of attention to my weight. I think I have lost 5-7 kgs in the four or five weeks I have been on it, but at the same time I have not been too fanatical with it. It's fairly easy to stick to, and definitely suppresses your appetite. I veered off a bit during Easter though. Also I have found that I have more energy (except for the first week when I felt awful), and I don't get sleepy in the late afternoon.

Tsuyoiko
19-04-06, 17:29
I think there is definitely something to the protein thing. I always include some protein in each meal, and it does seem to cut down on snacking. I used to eat toast for breakfast, and would be hungry again after about 10 minutes. Now I eat muesli with lots of oats, nuts and seeds and some skimmed milk, and it keeps me feeling full for much longer. Eating out can be a problem though, although it is getting better. A lot of places seem to think that cheese is the only meat substitute :okashii: Wetherspoons five bean chilli is good though - and dead cheap.

booo90
10-07-19, 14:28
Hi Everyone! I love meat (chicken moustly)
And I know best chicken recipe.
Check it here - https://club.cooking/recipe/bone-in-chicken-breast/
Delicious!))
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