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Mycernius
28-05-06, 23:49
I am from the county of Shakespeares birth, Warwickshire, and I am wondering which of the bards genre of plays and whic of those plays are your favourites, or do you even like Shakespeare. Far enough I live in North Warwickshire and my town, Nuneaton, is better known as the birthplace of George Eliot, but Warwickshire styles itself as Shakespeares county.
So what do you like. His comedies such as Comedy of Errors, The Tempest, Taming of the shrew; His Histroical plays like Henry V, Richard the Third or King John; his tragedies of Macbeth, King Lear, Romeo and Juliet; or his poems and sonnets.
I wasn't into Shakespeare as a teenager. Forced upon us at school you don't really appreciate the plays at that age when you have to write essays on a play wriiten in Elizabethan English. But as I got older I started to get into some of his plays. I love Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet and have even played the Duke of Syracuse in Comedy of Errors. It is a pity that schools can put off people from some great plays for life.

Minty
29-05-06, 01:14
I like mid summer's night dream, Romeo and Juliet and Othello.

No-name
29-05-06, 01:16
I had a great teacher in college...David Rhodes at UCLA... he brought in different actors to share with us on how parts can be read, how the director's choices will shape the play-- how you can play different parts with subtle changes... We heard from Patrick Stewart, Ian McClellan and Kenneth Branaugh among others...

Ma Cherie
29-05-06, 01:32
I happen to like:

Hamlet
As You Like It
A Midsummer's Night Dream

And my favorite is McBeth. :bluush:

Maciamo
29-05-06, 10:00
I like his historical plays, especially those about Ancient Rome (Julius Caesar, etc.). Tragedies come after that. I dislike Shakespeare's comedies (Midsummer Night's dream, the Tempest...) because they are unrealistic.

Mikawa Ossan
29-05-06, 12:53
Othello, MacBeth, Hamlet

It's all such quality stuff!

I'm also somewhat fond of The Merchant of Venice. I saw the Royal Shakespeare Company perform it here in Japan a few years ago. They only performed in 2 locations, from what I understood. Namely, Tokyo and Nagato City in Yamaguchi Prefecture. I saw it in Nagato.

kirei_na_me
30-05-06, 02:44
Sonnet 116

No-name
30-05-06, 03:19
SONNET 116
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O no! it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come:
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

Excellent!

How about sonnet 130?

Tsuyoiko
22-06-06, 17:21
My favourite by a mile is Macbeth, which I studied for my GCSE. I was lucky enough to have an English teacher who helped us fall in love with Shakespeare. I can practically quote the whole thing from memory.

I also love A Midsummer Night's Dream. It is so funny and magical. :-)

Sensuikan San
24-06-06, 21:59
"As you like it" and "Richard the Third" (Tony Soprano with a limp, in a codpiece ...always liked a good villain! :ninja:)

ジョン

Mycernius
24-06-06, 23:28
How about your favourite quotes.
Romeo and Juliet opening
"Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene.
Where ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From foth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life..."

Just sums up the play so well

Sensuikan San
25-06-06, 00:03
Ah! Yes! Shakespearian quotes! Always good!

Had an engineer friend once; he bought a house next to one that was owned by some pretty pretentious neighbors. They had named their home "Perchance to Dream"

It caused his wife a lot of hard work to prevent him (he said) from naming their own home from the following line ...


"... ah! There's the Rub!"
:biggrin:
ジョン

Tsuyoiko
26-06-06, 12:22
"Will all great Neptune's oceans wash this blood clean from my hand?
No, this my hand would rather the multitudinous seas incarnadine
Making the green one red" - Macbeth

Kinsao
20-07-06, 13:50
Sadly, I have not read many of Shakespeare's plays, and none of the historical ones. :bluush:
I like Macbeth the most out of the ones I have read; Hamlet second.

Ma Cherie
21-07-06, 00:36
To be honest, I can't say that I like Romeo and Juliet. Mainly because the it's been done so many times and there are so many different versions of it. :mad:

ricecake
09-08-06, 10:39
My favorite TV or film version of Shakespeare's works.

Hamlet
Romeo and Juliet
Othello

Duo
10-08-06, 18:55
I really like Othello... but in general all shakespeare's plays are so good. I love the metaphors and diction. amazing stuff

MikawaObasan
06-03-07, 04:11
What about A Midsummer Night's Dream

Ma Cherie
07-03-07, 05:00
I'm taking a course that is dedicated entirely to Shakespeare. I just finished Richard III and I'm going to read Titus Andronicus.

Richard III is now one of my favorite Shakespeare plays. :-)

wordnote
13-03-08, 12:13
As for me I would advantage"Hamlet". The main character of the work is rebellious.He wants to break the wall raised beetween men as"Pink Floyd" says.Though he seems to know from the very beginning that he is sacrificed.Despite his desperation he did not get used to the evil reigning around him. Hamlet knows that he cannot alter men but,anaway,his honest soul cannot be silent.He seems to display some closeness to Don Kihot a great as well hero of Cervantes.

LeeAnn
08-06-10, 16:48
As i prefer reading either scary or funny books i prefer Shakespear's comedies

Mako
26-08-10, 18:53
Certainly, Hamlet is Shakespeare窶冱 most psychologically complex character, balancing grief and affection so perfectly 窶 as the critic James Agate once said, 窶廩amlet must make us cry one minute and shudder the next窶.

Cambrius (The Red)
07-09-10, 01:00
Macbeth and Hamlet are my favorites.

bud
09-09-10, 19:39
Macbeth and Hamlet are my favorites.
They are also my favourites :good_job:

Angela
02-01-11, 18:33
King Lear is my favorite I think; his most profound work.
I also like Hamlet very much. A Midsummer Night's Dream and Twelfth Night have great charm, and the poetry of the language in Romeo and Juliet is breathtaking. (Read his sonnets too)

I guess you can tell I love Shakespeare-my favorite writer of all time.

What are some of your favorite quotes? These are some of mine; I'll limit myself to a few that may not be as well known.

He can be pretty grim:

As flies to wanton boys are we to th'gods,
They kill us for their sport.
King Lear Act 4 scene 1, 36-37.

Or how is this for a call to blood lust and war:

And Caesar's spirit, raging for revenge,
With Ate by his side come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice
Cry "Havoc" and let slip the dogs of war,
That his foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion men, groaning for burial

Julius Caesar Act 3, scene 1, 270-275

Or...
"O what men dare do! What men may do! What men daily
do, not knowing what they do"
Much Ado About Nothing (IV, i, 19-21)

As to love, he can swing from...
Sonnet 147
My love is as a fever, longing still
For that which longer nurseth the disease
Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill,
The uncertain sickly appetite to please.''

To...
...Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O, no! it is an ever-fixed mark,...
Sonnet 116

He's fabulous.

rensen
24-01-11, 18:48
Romeo and Juliet is - besides Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice - the most beautifully written love story of all times - it is just incredible how marvelously narrated and perfectly dedicated these two lost souls seem to be on their hard struggle for love.

Regulus
25-01-11, 18:19
... And gentlemen in England, now a-bed, shall think themelves accursed they were not here, and hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks, that fought with us upon St. Crispian's Day.

Henry V

adamski
01-09-11, 10:07
A Sonnet I know by heart and can quote without the necessity of using a text is Sonnet 41 - it is so beautiful and it just moves me.

Those petty wrongs that liberty commits,
When I am sometime absent from thy heart,
Thy beauty and thy years full well befits,
For still temptation follows where thou art.
Gentle thou art and therefore to be won,
Beauteous thou art, therefore to be assailed;
And when a woman woos, what woman's son
Will sourly leave her till she have prevailed?
Ay me! but yet thou mightest my seat forbear,
And chide try beauty and thy straying youth,
Who lead thee in their riot even there
Where thou art forced to break a twofold truth,
Hers by thy beauty tempting her to thee,
Thine, by thy beauty being false to me.

Michel Gilson
09-05-13, 18:45
It would probably be a toss up between Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Nights Dream, with a slight edge to that most classic of love stories Romeo and Juliet. A story that has some relevance in my own marriage.

Angela
11-05-18, 20:12
We never tire of it, do we? :)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJZhDHdlk3w

mitty
11-11-19, 20:10
I like Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth and Cymbeline, but I love best his sonnets.

To end sonnet 116, above-

Love's not time's' fool, though rosy lips and cheeks within his bending sickle's compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, but bears it out, even to the end of doom;
If this be error, and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

From sonnet 97 -

How like a winter hath my absence been
From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year!
What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen!
What old December's bareness everywhere!

From Sonnet 144 -

To me, fair friend, you never can be old,
For as you were when first your eye I eyed,
Such seems your beauty still.

From Cymbeline -

Fear no more the heat 'o the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers, come to dust.

Angela
12-01-20, 19:09
Happy Shakespeare Day.

I can tell my mood by the quotes which come to mind. I guess I'm currently a bit gloomy. :(

https://www.themescompany.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/william-shakespeare-quotes-5.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/236x/6b/70/01/6b70013b079f3bf72e89d8fd427ebc11.jpg

https://img0.etsystatic.com/108/0/11769802/il_340x270.951541134_emj8.jpg

http://9buz.com/content/uploads/images/August2014/william_shakespeare_love_all_trust_a_few_do_wrong_ to_none__2013-07-05.jpg


https://img1.etsystatic.com/162/1/11923751/il_340x270.1141731643_cdr0.jpg

https://floramemae.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/sonnet1161.jpg?w=812

If you really want to know the impact of the latter, go to 4:30 below and listen to Lawrence Olivier recite it. :) They should have had him record all the sonnets and the major soliloquies for posterity.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWDCCf1CYXI

Tamakore
14-01-20, 03:02
Macbeth, Hamlet, Richard III, Richard II, Timon of Athens, As You Like It

Sonnets 15, 33, 62, 71, 73, 107

Quotes by Macbeth:

Stars, hide your fires. Let not light see my black and deep desires.

O, full of scorpions is my mind, dear wife!

Ere the bat hath flown his cloistered flight, ere to black Hecat's summons the shard-borne beetle, with his drowsy hums, hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done a deed of dreadful note.

Light thickens and the crow makes wing to the rooky wood. Good things of day begin to droop and drowse, whiles night's black agents to their preys do rouse.

I am in blood stepped in so far, that, should I wade no more, returning were as tedious as go o'er.

I have lived long enough: my way of life has fallen into the sere, the yellow leaf

Cure her of that. Can'st thou not minister to a mind diseased, pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, raze out the written troubles of the brain, and with some sweet, oblivious antidote cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff which weighs upon the heart?

I 'gin to be aweary of the sun and wish the estate o'the world were now undone.

Angela
14-01-20, 05:57
Macbeth, Hamlet, Richard III, Richard II, Timon of Athens, As You Like It

Sonnets 15, 33, 62, 71, 73, 107

Quotes by Macbeth:

Stars, hide your fires. Let not light see my black and deep desires.

O, full of scorpions is my mind, dear wife!

Ere the bat hath flown his cloistered flight, ere to black Hecat's summons the shard-borne beetle, with his drowsy hums, hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done a deed of dreadful note.

Light thickens and the crow makes wing to the rooky wood. Good things of day begin to droop and drowse, whiles night's black agents to their preys do rouse.

I am in blood stepped in so far, that, should I wade no more, returning were as tedious as go o'er.

I have lived long enough: my way of life has fallen into the sere, the yellow leaf

Cure her of that. Can'st thou not minister to a mind diseased, pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, raze out the written troubles of the brain, and with some sweet, oblivious antidote cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff which weighs upon the heart?

I 'gin to be aweary of the sun and wish the estate o'the world were now undone.

Indeed, wouldn't it be grand if someone could do that? :)

At different stages of my life I have loved certain plays more or less. I'm reading and re-reading Lear a lot lately, Hamlet too, however.

He's an unending source of inspiration and comfort and sometimes sheer joy at the beauty of his language.

He can break your heart or make it sing:

"ConstanceIII iv 98 (http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/views/plays/play_view.php?WorkID=kingjohn&Act=3&Scene=4&Scope=scene&LineHighlight=1479#1476)
Verse
King John (https://www.shakespeare-monologues.org/plays/26)



Grief fills the room up of my absent child,
Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me,
Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words,
Remembers me of all his gracious parts,
Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form;
Then, have I reason to be fond of grief?
Fare you well: had you such a loss as I,
I could give better comfort than you do.
I will not keep this form upon my head,
When there is such disorder in my wit.
O Lord! my boy, my Arthur, my fair son!
My life, my joy, my food, my all the world!
My widow-comfort, and my sorrows' cure!

Wheal
14-01-20, 20:26
This string makes me want to go find my British Lit book and reread!

15-01-20, 17:47
Like many, I love Shakespeare too, but I find his comedies (Midsummer Nights excepted) hard to take. It's not that he's a bad writer of comedy, but that the idea of what is comic has changed so much that these comedies seem simply abusive, as with Merry Wives. Of course I have the same problems with early comic movies that so often depend on the pain or humiliation of others as their source of laughter.

15-01-20, 17:50
My favorite of Shakespeare's are his history plays, Richard III being the prime example. Henry IV, however, is a little difficult because I don't "get" the comedy of Falstaff.