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Maciamo
11-08-06, 14:50
The more fluent one becomes in a (foreign) language and the more one can judge what they like/dislike about it.

English

English is my favourite language of expression, because of its richness of vocabulary, flexibility and grammatical convenience (all the useful nuances without the annoying rules), and because it combines the Latin and Germanic cultures. Yet, there are things I dislike about the English vocabulary. For instance, the lack of home-related words compared to French (see Missing words in English (http://www.eupedia.com/forum/showthread.php?t=21309)).

I find quite primitive and unscientific to have words ending in "-fish" for sea/water creatures that are not fish, like shellfish, crayfish, jellyfih, etc. I also dislike words like 'pineapple' or 'eggplant', because a pineapple is not related to an apple, and 'eggplant' sounds too weird (it's just a word vaguely based on the appearance of an "egg"). Fortunately the latter is only American English.


French

I prefer French to English is formal or business situation because I find it has more "fixed" polite expressions, which makes it easier (like in Japanese). In informal situation or when writing I prefer English though.

What I dislike most about French is the ridiculously irregular grammar ("don't forget the exception to the exception to rule blablabla which applies in this case because of position of the subject in relation to the indirect object" :okashii: ).

Quite a few French idioms are so metaphorical or old-fashioned that they sound really ridiculous or nonsensical. Of course, English has plenty of metaphorical idioms too, but some French ones are just uniquely ridiculous (while some other are well found indeed). In French, an idiomatic way to say that something happened by chance is to say literally "at the little happiness the chance" (au petit bonheur la chance) - frankly, what's that ! :mad: If you want to say that you "enjoy yourself", you can say that you "take your foot" (prendre son pied) in French. It's a very common expresion but I never like it because it is too ridiculous.

Ma Cherie
16-08-06, 07:35
French:

What I like about French is that to me, it's a beautiful language. I like how it sounds when people speak French. I feel that French isn't a difficult language to learn because it has such a limited supply of words. But what I dislike about French are the issues with what's masculine and what's feminine. Even though my French is limited, I think get the general idea of what's considered feminine and masculine. It seems that when talking about a general concept or idea, it seems that's when words are feminine.

English:

I like English because it's my native language. :cool: But I, too like English because of the vocabulary. What I don't like about English is that to me, there are times when English doesn't seem all that logical.

Maciamo
16-08-06, 14:30
I was hoping for likes and dislikes going beyond "because it's my native language" or learning issues like remembering which is masculine or feminine. I intentionally refrained from commenting on Dutch, German, Italian, Spanish and Japanese because I didn't feel I had reached a 'native enough' level, or I haven't analysed them enough or used them in all kinds of situation (e.g. business) to really feel what I like or dislike about the language apart from learning issues.

I didn't comment on which language I found more beautiful, because it depends too much on the voice, accent and intonation of the person speaking it. French can be as ugly as it can be beautiful, and the same is true for other languages. French sounds probably best when spoken by "annoucer-like" woman with a warm, sensual voice. I prefer English spoken in a British upper-class and slighlty old-fashioned (late 19th or early 20th century) accent Gender doesn't matter, but older people tend to sound better. German and Italian languages have many regional accents, but I do not know them well enough to pinpoint my favourite one. Japanese sounds best to me when spoken by in a virile "samurai-like" or "yakusa-like" voice.

Kinsao
22-08-06, 19:07
Well, I can only comment about French and English, and I'm not sure that my thoughts would be suitable. :bluush:

About French:
Gahhhhhhhhhh I can't put my thoughts into words at all! :banghead: My mind has gone a blank now I'm trying to explain... I'm so bad at this. :( I can only think to say that there are some things I can express in French better than in English simply because the turn of phrase - could be grammar, word order or particular expressions - just happens to best suit my mood at the time. I can't describe it better than that... :gomen: ... for example, my lastest journal entry I had to write it in French because I couldn't express what I wanted to say so well in English. Not because of the vocabulary but just the mood of the phrasing.

I'm totally not making any sense...
ahem... moving swiftly on...

About English:
As you say, Mac, it seems there is a bit wider vocabulary, and sometimes I am a little frustrated at trying to translate a particular English word into French and having to settle on something that falls a little short of what I want to express. Again like you, I also like the combination of Latin and Germanic influences, which seem to give a broad range of expression. ^^

Both languages have their grammatical complications, of course. ;-) I wouldn't exactly say English is without "annoying rules"! It's true there are lots of irregularities in the French grammar but for some reason they don't bother me all that much, and English has irregularities too. In the same way, the 'nonsensical' phrases don't bother me - probably because I have not so 'logical personality' as you, Mac! :) ........ (I mean, why say "casser les pieds" for "annoy" anyway?! :mad: - but I don't really care about it!)

And the sound of languages; well, I think any language can sound nice or horrible depending on the speaker. :-)

Ooo - I find upper-class British accents horribly annoying! :bluush: I don't just mean as in 'well-spoken' (i.e. like RP), but the true upper-class accent... *winces* >_<

Ma Cherie
22-08-06, 21:39
I find it much easier for a language to have less vocabulary words, well at least at times I do. :p That's why I like French, because even though there aren't as many words like English, I feel that sometimes there is only one way of to say something. Instead of using complex sentences when there's no need for them. I know how you feel Kinsao, as I'm learning more French I have to resist the urge to translate a paticular word into English.


About Japanese, even though we're only discussing English and French. One reason why I like Japanese is because I like the patterns of syllables are important as the next. Like "konnichiwa" kon-ni-chi-wa. It gives the language a certian rhythm.

Minty
23-08-06, 01:13
I find it much easier for a language to have less vocabulary words, well at least at times I do. :p That's why I like French, because even though there aren't as many words like English, I feel that sometimes there is only one way of to say something. Instead of using complex sentences when there's no need for them. I know how you feel Kinsao, as I'm learning more French I have to resist the urge to translate a paticular word into English.


Actually French has more vocabularies than English.

Ok, my comments on learning European languages.

English, I hate the irregular grammars, but I like the way English sounds, I think it has beautiful pronunciations.

French, well as you know my first language is Mandarin, Chinese.

So when I first learnt the English language the most challenging things were the tenses because our grammar is easy, but when I get to learn French I think boy it is more difficult than English, it also took a while to get the pronunciations right. I don't know, I find learning French tricky, at the beggining I kept on getting it mixed up with German... I am still learning the language I am not fluent in French.

German, I took it for a year when I was a University student back in Australia. I think the pronunciation is easy because it is very close to English but the grammar is a headache it is more difficult than French grammar in my opinion and the spelling is most difficult to remember their words are so long.

However I liked my German teacher, she used to teach in Malaysia and she was rather nice to me.

I am not fluent in German, but as I live in Strasbourg and we go to Germany to buy things I can understand the products' names in German, and not buy the wrong products. Although there seems to be quite some number of Germans online who speak English but the Germans in the stores we go to in Germany donft , some can speak French though...

Duo
03-09-06, 21:31
French is a language with very a very complex grammar structure. I think at times it can be quite enjoyable. I have a love/hate relationship with french. At times i really enjoy speaking it becuase it sounds "chic" and fancy. However, when it comes to grammar i feel like burning the paper im writing on. There are way too many rules and expetions to the rules and expetions to the expetions and so forth.

English is simpler. It's more malluable and moldable. It's straightforward but when used in the right way by the right person it can be sublime. It's easier to give your own personal shape to english than french i would say.

Italian is in my view a more romantic language then french. It's simpler grammar wise and pronounciation wise it lacks the annoying nasal sounds and the "rrrrrrrr" in your throat that french employs.

Ma Cherie
03-09-06, 22:38
I think Italian is another one of those "beautiful" languages, and Spanish, in my opinion. :bluush:

Oh, and that thing about the "rrrrr" that you make with your throat in French, after learning French for awhile it seems I've gotten use to it. Though it can be rather annoying at times. I used to cough when I first started learning French "r".:bluush:

Maciamo
03-09-06, 23:04
Duo, you have expressed my exact thoughts in these 3 languages. :-)

Ma Cherie, I don't think anymore that Spanish is such a beautiful language (after learning it). Real Spanish (from Castilla) is too harsh with all those "j" sounds and snake-like "c" and "z" (like in Zaragoza). It is "drier" and lacks the joyful intonation of Italian. It doesn't have the elegance of French, nor the grandeur of English.

Kinsao
22-09-06, 13:13
I recently started learning a bit of Latvian, and it makes me feel very glad that English does not use different cases. :mad:

Dutch Baka
05-10-06, 16:36
What I dislike about my language is that foreigners can't pronounce the G, and my wife makes joke about that!

Maciamo
05-10-06, 18:31
What I dislike about my language is that foreigners can't pronounce the G, and my wife makes joke about that!

But what is even funnier is that the Dutch "g" is pronounced in very different ways in the North of the Netherlands (closer to a German "ch" or Spanish "j"), in the South and in Flanders. People in Brugge are said to be almost unable to pronounce "g" so that they cannot even pronounce their city name. :D

buruburu69
07-10-06, 20:14
English:
I like the sounds and the rythm of the language, the way word are bouncing. I understand why Eminem is not French...Also, It s very easy to convey an idea with a minimum of words.

French:
My native language, many different sounds.
As most of the sounds are "flat", not stressed, to my mind, it is easy to learn orally, (written French is tricky and has been created to torture foreigners!!!), also it is very flexible to play with the tone. Thus you can pronunce a same sentence, according to the sound you say it, the meaning change.

Italian:
sounds sexy and familiar

Spanish:
idem (sexy), but the sound of "j" isn't nice to my ear.I guess it is the same for English native speaker who hear the French "r".

Dutch:
Sounds weird.

German:
Sometime I like the melody of the language. Sometime I think it sounds ridiculous. very long sentence, take your breath...

And I am sorry there is more word in English than French. But don't forget French supplied word to the english language for many century (and vice versa).
But, dont forget!!! French language is supplied by...many many other languages!!!

Minty
09-10-06, 22:52
English:



And I am sorry there is more word in English than French. But don't forget French supplied word to the english language for many century (and vice versa).
But, dont forget!!! French language is supplied by...many many other languages!!!

You mean there are more words in French than English!:p

Bonjour! Where do you live in France! I live in Strasbourg with my French husband.

Kinsao
12-10-06, 13:25
As most of the sounds are "flat", not stressed, to my mind, it is easy to learn orally, (written French is tricky and has been created to torture foreigners!!!), also it is very flexible to play with the tone. Thus you can pronunce a same sentence, according to the sound you say it, the meaning change.


:p One of the things that I find, I have to use my brain a bit when I'm writing, but when talking, I find French easier... it seems odd, because usually people find a language easier when reading/writing because you have time to think about what you are going to say, whereas in speaking/listening you are "on the spot", but I find the latter a bit easier in French, because of the flexibility as you say... I can make an indication of my ideas, and get the meaning across, without having to have precise grammar; in fact, even in only a very few words... :-) (and no one in France has ever tried to talk to me in English, so I consider that a positive sign, although maybe it's just that none of them spoke English :D but I think in the capital at least some would have English skills! :relief: )

Zauriel
31-10-06, 17:19
German
Likes: rich morphology, complex sentence constructions, three gendered cases (masculine, neuter and feminine) and distinctions between nominative, genitive, accusative, and dative cases.
Dislikes: confusingly grammatical differences between the dependent clauses and independent clauses or main clauses and subclauses.


English:
Likes: very simple syntax, abundant vocabulary, advanced phonology
Dislikes: No distinction between the singular and plural pronouns of the second person ("You" pronoun is both singular and plural), lack of a genderless third-person pronoun, insufficient verb conjugations of the subjunctive tense, too many irregular verbs, too many irregular plural markers, inadequate morphology, clumsy semantics,


Irregular Plural markers:
mice
children
octopi (plural of octopus)
alumni (plural of alumnus)


Tagalog:
Likes: Its ergative-absolutive cases, genderless pronouns, distinctions between the articles of people and things, ligatures, complex verbs, an unique morphology and an unique phonology.
Dislikes: Limited vocabulary, too many complex verb affixes, prefixes and suffixes, and lack of definite articles in the possessive and indirect object cases.

French
Likes: simple sentence constructions and and how the words are spelled seem romantic,
Dislikes: The way the pronunciation is too different from the spelling.


Italian:
likes: plentiful verb conjugations, four cases (masculine singular, feminine singular, masculine plural, feminine plural), the way it is spelled sounds romantic
Dislikes: Not too strict rules on Italian grammar, limited phonology, too many verb tenses

Japanese:
Likes: unique honorifics in reference to personal relationships,
Dislikes: limited phonology

Kinsao
15-11-06, 16:07
Just thought I'd check in here again :p to say that I'm starting to learn Hungarian. :-)

Of course, I only know a very few things yet! :blush:

So far, I like the pronunciation.. it's quite beautiful and not too hard (beyond actually remembering it, but once you heard/read the instruction, it's ok ^^).
And dislike.. umm.. can I say.. the fact that it has 22 cases? (!!!) :eek:

Mycernius
15-11-06, 23:33
I always thought Maltese sounds like Klingon. Odd, eh.

Crazy Russian
25-11-06, 01:01
English. I like the way the language sounds (especially in songs).

French. Sometimes it is rather difficult for me to memorise which French word is masculine and which one is feminine. The reason is that the same word can be masculine in French but feminine in Russian. It drives me crazy. :D For example, the word table is feminine in French but it is masculine in Russian. Or the word fenetre is feminine in French but it is neuter in Russian. Funny, isn't it? :)

Japanese. It is difficult for me to memorise Japanese words. They sound similar to each other. For example, igaku, kadeki, kuiki, kioku, ugoki, kukaku, etc. Please, advise me how to memorise Japanese words! I am scared!


What is the most terrible thing in the world? Love song in German! :D


By the way, those who speak English (the English, Americans, etc.) write the pronoun I with a capital letter. We (Russians) write the pronoun so: i.

Those who speak English write the pronoun you with lowercase letter. We write it so: You. Interesting, isn't it? :)



Scientists have discovered the fact that the right brain hemisphere of individuals who think in Russian is much more developed than the right brain hemisphere of individuals who think in English. Plus, the left brain hemisphere of individuals who think in English is much more developed than the left brain hemisphere of individuals who think in Russian.


Left side processes: speech, analysis, time, sequence.

Right side processes: creativity, patterns, spatial awareness, context.


Left side recognises: letters, numbers, words.

Right side recognises: faces, places, objects.


Individuals who are predominately left sided tend to be more verbal, analytical, and problem solvers; while individuals who are predominately right sided tend to be artsy, good with math, and are more visual in nature.



Functions associated with hemispheric dominance include:

Right Hemispheric Functions:

1. Connected to left side of the body.

2. Integrates many inputs at once.

3. Processes information more diffusely and simultaneously.

4. Deals with space.

5. Responsible for gestures, facial movements, and body language.

6. Responsible for relational and mathematical operations.

7. Specializes in recognizing places, faces, objects, and music.

8. Does intuitive and holistic thinking.

9. The seat of passion and dreams.

10. Crucial side for artists, craftsman, and musicians.


Left Hemispheric Functions:

1. Connected to right side of body.

2. Deals with inputs one at a time.

3. Processes information in a linear and sequential manner.

4. Deals with time.

5. Responsible for verbal expression and language.

6. Responsible for invariable and arithmetic operations.

7. Specialises in recognising words and numbers.

8. Does logical and analytical thinking.

9. The seat of reason.

10. Crucial side for wordsmiths and engineers.

Niedy
01-12-06, 20:51
German: my native language... I absolutely hate the sound of typically germany-german... its harsh and nasal and doesn't sound nice... I like austrian german though... not all dialects and definitely not the low-class slang, but my everday standard german...
german can be a very beautiful language... there are loads of words and ways to say something... but never ever read a specialist book if you don't have to... the thing that is nice for literature and stuff becomes a real pest when applied to scientific texts... there seems to be a competition in who makes the longest and hardest to understand (even for natives) sentences... an believe me... in german you are able to make REALLY long sentences... with loads of sub-clauses... grammar might be horrible for learner's... I mean how do you explain why "girl" needs the neutral gender article... :D

English: learned in school for 9 years... love it to some extent... I love specialists books in english... they usually are quite nice to read... short sentences... not too many foreign words... heaven! ^^ but i sometimes think it lacks beauty in everday use...

French: learned in school for 5 years... Like it, but hated the teacher... I think French is easier when written (I usually am better in writing in any language)... right now, whenever I try to make a French sentence, Japanese pops up... but I'm able to read it... I dislike Parisians... stuck-up folks... :p

Japanese: LOVE it ;) I study it at university and I pretty much love everything about it... the sound, the sheer endlessness of ways to say stuff, the beauty of the language... the one thing i don't love is the fact, that the verb comes last (and in spoken language often is left out)... there you have a reaaaaaaaaaally long sentence and only when you hear the last word, you are able to understand... that's kinda hard... :relief:

Latin: yeah... its dead... otherwise I'd killed it... :okashii:
Mandarin: just started studying... I think its hard to remember the tones for each and every hanzi... and that they actually sometimes change... but the grammar doesn't seem too difficult (better than japanese, that's for sure)... not sure about the beauty... sometimes I like the sound, sometimes I really hate it... ^^ I don't know about expressing stuff yet... so can't say anything about it

Belisana
15-01-09, 05:24
Ma Cherie, I don't think anymore that Spanish is such a beautiful language (after learning it).It doesn't really sound like you have a good ear if your liking changes that much from hearing the ponetics to pronouncing it :p


Real Spanish (from Castilla) There is not such a thing like real Spanish BUT a somewhat standarized norm of Spanish that you call "from Castilla", and that's hardly even spoken in Castilla as it is.


is too harsh with all those "j" sounds and snake-like "c" and "z" (like in Zaragoza).Curiously enough, these are the traits that I like most and best about Spanish. The Z somewhat makes it different too. This is an example of why I am fascinated by the Spanish diction:

(well i can't post urls here yet)


It is "drier" and lacks the joyful intonation of Italian.and that being a Basque trait makes it unique amongst all the rest Romance languages. It's funny that the ups and downs is what I find a bit "annoying" of Italian after hearing for awhile.


It doesn't have the elegance of French, nor the grandeur of English.Not that elegance is a thing that you can measure at all, but I would find the most harsh language sounding elegant if an elegant person (indeed) is speaking.

About the grandeur, written like that, or greatness... I am afraid that Marx o Freud did not think like you when they learnt Spanish to read The Quixote in original version.

Thanks!

Michael
10-04-09, 14:50
I have 3 native languages, with English they would be 4 fluent ones.

Greek:
My 1st native language, being from Crete, Greece.
what I like about Greek is that it's extensive, very intense and rich with words and grammar, it's old and rich with history, and it carries so much words that even can be evidences of the long Greek history, or generally, the human history, you feel the history of Greece when you hear it or speak it.

What I don't like about it is that Greek has a very limited range of pronunciation, like, NO ACTUAL LETTERS for some common sounds like b,d,g (as in 'game'),h,w. so we have to write like d=nt, b=mp...etc.

Arabic:
My 2nd native language, as I lived in the Holy Lands for 9 years.
What I like about Arabic that it's constucted over 200 years by the most clever Arab minds 100 years before Islam. Being constructed on over 10 different languages such as Hebrew and Egyptian, Arabic is AMAZINGLY rich with vocabulary, and that makes it hard to learn as you hear 20 different expressions and words for the same meaning and all of them are commonly used! And that's why there is NOTHING on the planet you can't express in Arabic. It's grammar is fantastic with a very little range of exceptions, it has a very wide range of pronunciation and over 40 sounds expressed very easily by writing as every letter expresses only one sound.

An example for the Arabic vocabulary:
Water can mean kawthar, maa', mayy and many other words.
the Arabic word ''oud' can mean: wooden stick, perfume, music instrument, the Palestinian Arabic slang for "come back", remaining, a small and thin plastic stick and many other words only God knows.

And what I don't like about it is that it's pronunciation is impossible to nail if the learner was not Arab, for me, I speak it well, but still not like Arabs.
A special muscle was discovered in Arabs is the reason why they can pronounce those sounds.

Hebrew:
Hebrew is my 3rd native laguage which I learned in a UN mission my parents had in Israel when I was 10 years old and since that time we live between Israel and Greece.
It's the main language which Arabic was constructed on (Ancient Hebrew) and Modern Hebrew was consrtucted over Arabic! Weird!
I like it because it's an easier version of Arabic.
I dislike that it's limited in vocabulary and verbs, and 50% of it's words are built up from simplier ones.

English:
It's very simple and feels too modern, poor with vocabulary compared to other languages.
The grammar is very simple which making English very easy to learn and thus it's not interesting to study it's structure and go deep in it.

French:
French is a romantic, sexy language I tried many times to learn and gave up but now I can handle myself in France, but not in every detail.

Spanish:
I studied Spanish when I was in the 7th grade and I enjoyed it, but forgot it all, I think it's the not-really-interesting version of the fabulous Italian!

Italian:
Romantic, sexy, simple, easy. I love Italian.

German:
I liked nothing in German so I like : nothing.
Dislike: All of it.

Latin:
Sounds too ANCIENT!!! and so related to French and Spanish and the most thing Italian.

Turkish:
I liked that Turkish grammar is so easy.
I disliked: the awful pronunciation and the sounds of Turkish, it's very silly and disgusting and most of the times sounds like gibberish.

Russian & Bulgarian:
They both sound like speaking non-sense in non-sense with non-sense so I gave them up on the 1st class and the same day!

I know my words are a little harsh with some languages so I'm sorry to all the native speakers of those languages...

Maciamo
10-04-09, 18:33
English:
It's very simple and feels too modern, poor with vocabulary compared to other languages.

Are you kidding ? English is the world's richest language in terms of vocabulary. There are about 500,000 words. A educated person in a developed country knows only about 20,000 to 30,000 words in their mother tongue. You only need about 5,000 words to be considered fluent in a language.

In comparison, French language, supposedly rich because it is a great literary language and used to be the language of the aristocracy and the diplomacy, only has 70,000 words (that's partly because there are so many dialects and minor languages in France that were excluded from standard French). But I am pretty sure that French has more words than a recent language like modern Hebrew.



The grammar is very simple which making English very easy to learn and thus it's not interesting to study it's structure and go deep in it.

You should read the works of Winston Churchill before claiming that English grammar is simple. English grammar has its complexities. Few other languages have 5 future tenses, 4 forms of conditional, and 6 perfect tenses (past, present, future ; simple or continuous).

What you meant is perhaps that English grammar is easier to learn than most other European languages, because there is less to memorise (almost no conjugation).



Latin:
Sounds too ANCIENT!!! and so related to French and Spanish and the most thing Italian.

That is because it is ancient. ;-)

Marianne
11-04-09, 16:51
Are you kidding ? English is the world's richest language in terms of vocabulary. There are about 500,000 words. A educated person in a developed country knows only about 20,000 to 30,000 words in their mother tongue. You only need about 5,000 words to be considered fluent in a language.

I don't quite agree with this. English is only rich because it is influenced by many other languages over the years. English words that are not borrowed by other languages are a lot less than greek/russian/arabic ones.

As for the languages I can speak:

English: I like that its very easy to learn (at least for me), I like the English and Irish accent very much even though my accent is closer to American-Irish (from what i was told by native english speakers). I also find the english grammar way too easy. The vocubulary was never a problem to me cause there are so many greek-origin words.
What i dont like in english is that the way some letters are pronnounced makes no sense. For example the letter e is pronnounced differently in the words egg and return or the letter i : ice and ill, letter a: apple - hate

French: I adore the french accent. I find the french grammar to be closer to the greek one (even though I haven't confirmed this with other people. Its just a feeling i get). I like that it's very similar to other latin-origin languages so it helps me learn those easier.
What i dont like in french is the fact that there is no rule for whether something is male or female. Greek has the same problem and that's what makes it harder for me, cause one word can be male in french and female in greek etc.

German: I like the fact that in the past (when i couldn't speak a word in german) I could partially understand it because of the similarities with english and greek.
I don't like the German accent and I think the grammar rules are not the easiest..

Spanish: I recently started learning spanish but I like the fact that its so easy in grammar and vocabulary (I guess it helps a lot that i can speak French very well). I dont like the way some words are pronnounced and sometimes i get the feeling that people speaking spanish talk superfast.

Japanese: Just started learning but I love it. I love japanese culture in general and i guess this makes me like the language very much. I love the way japanese sounds but I dont like that many words are sooo similar to each other. Makes it harder to learn..

Greek: my native language. I love it cause of the fact that everything has a reason to be called the way it is called, it's not random, if you analyse the etymology of greek words you will see what i mean. I like the fact that it has influenced so many western european languages that I can find words with greek roots everytime I read or listen to english/french/german/spanish/italian ( http://www.godimitris.gr/a13_en.php ). Although I don't like the greek accent. I prefer a lot more the ancient greek accent that the modern one. Nowadays, the way words sound is a lot more simplified, while in the past it sounded like music...

Maciamo
11-04-09, 20:50
I don't quite agree with this. English is only rich because it is influenced by many other languages over the years. English words that are not borrowed by other languages are a lot less than greek/russian/arabic ones.

It's true that English borrowed a lot, but this is also why it is so rich. English is a hybrid language created on the merger of Old French (itself a variant of Latin with a lot of borrowing from Greek and some from Gaulish Celt), Old English (aka Anglo-Saxon) and Old Norse (through the Vikings of the Danelaw).

You can attest of this diversity in this post (http://www.eupedia.com/forum/showpost.php?p=349824&postcount=2). If you have learnt French or another Romance language, it is fairly easy to tell Germanic words from Latin ones in English. But unless you are well-versed in Germanic linguistic, you may not realise that even Germanic words have multiple origins. For example, "house" comes from Old Norse, but "home" from Anglo-Saxon. They originally meant the same, but "home" has come to be used differently with time (in a way not found in most languages, in such expressions as "home-sick", "home sweet home", "home alone", or "go home").

Another reason for the richness of English is that it is very flexible and new words can be coin quite easily (e.g. I have been googling). Many new terms in sciences, technologies or lifestyle also appeared first in English because of the importance of English speaking countries in the 19th and 20th centuries. Pretty much every terms specific to computering, aviation, aerospace, or recent genetics (e.g. haplogroup, genomics, introns), for instance, first appeared in English. Even words that sound Greek and are built on Greek roots, are in fact English (e.g. telephone, technocracy, heterozygosity, meiosis), because that is the language in which they were coined and first used.

A third factor is the diversity of regional English. No other language on Earth has ever been spoken (by native speakers) on such a geographic scale as English. British English is already varied enough - especially the hybridised Gaelic version that are Scottish and Welsh English. Add to that Irish English, American English, South African English, Indian English, Singaporian English, Australian English... not just with their regional terms and expressions, but all their slang too. No language has more regional and slang terms than English.



What i dont like in french is the fact that there is no rule for whether something is male or female.

This is not entirely true. Genders in French are inherited from Latin, and will 99% of the time be the same in Italian. So if you have learnt Italian and don't know if a French word is masculine or feminine, think about the Italian equivalent, which gender you can determine with the final vowel (o = masculine, a = feminine). For example, if you wonder whether oiseau is masculine or feminine, the Italian is uccello, so it is masculine in French too. You still need to know the gender of Italian words in -e, which can be either. But at least you won't mistake for about 80% of the words.


I love the way japanese sounds but I dont like that many words are sooo similar to each other. Makes it harder to learn..

I agree. I am often irritated by the excess of homonyms in Japanese. It's good for puns though.


Greek: my native language. I love it cause of the fact that everything has a reason to be called the way it is called, it's not random, if you analyse the etymology of greek words you will see what i mean.

That is also the case in German, for the most part.

Mitsuo
25-04-09, 05:34
I won't go through all of them, but I will talk about German since I'm studying it right now. I'm heading into my second year at the University that I attend.

I'll just say what I dislike about it. The three different genders: masculine, feminine, and neuter. The dative case: Seriously! retarded.......

That's all I have to say about that. However, I am enjoying the language very much and intend to go as far as possible with it. I would love to learn as many languages as possible.

Tully
14-05-09, 12:30
English is an amazing Language. It's made great my it's ready introduction of words from anywhere. For the greatest part, other European Languages.
For Native English speakers to learn other languages can be the most enlightening and broadening of experiences. Filling up a world of Historical knowledge along the way. The history explains the seeming silliness of some English words. Take the word "Sound" I think in English it has 5?? possible meanings, all of which occurred through different language groups arriving in what is now the UK & Ireland and the words accepted into common vocabulary often giving name to some slight variance of the same theme. This taking on of other origin words I feel has probably created the subtleties that can be acheived in English speech, poetry and writing.
Language though is a great aid in the study of our Origins. Some of the books on the origins of modern languages provide fascinating clues as to our origins. Their study along with the recent DNA revelations are going to increasingly continue to zero in on our beginnings and travels as a relatively new and extraordinary species on this Earth of ours.

humanbyrace
28-06-09, 21:20
World's richest language seems to be Arabic as the 13'th century Lisan al arab dictionary contains near 4,5 mln words(if we add neologisms,current scientific terminology and dialectal words it can reach 5mln words)

But of course a great part of these words are somehow synonim
(with nuances)

Cambrius (The Red)
29-06-09, 22:45
My native languages are English and Continental Portuguese. A am also fully fluent in Spanish and have a good business working knowledge of French and Italian.

I prefer to use English professionally but I think that both French and Portuguese are more complex languages. Both have beautiful, unique phonetic structures.

trance0
05-07-09, 19:20
What I like particularly about my own native language(Slovene) is that it is quite a phonetic language, far more so than French or English. I also find its structure very interesting, although most foreigners would probably see it as an unnecessary complication. I like it that Slovene is a relatively archaic and conservative language in terms of grammar and vocabulary. I also like the richness and numerousness of Slovene dialects. And I find its sound and accent very pleasing to the ear as well.

Cambrius (The Red)
05-07-09, 19:29
I find Arabic and Japanese languages phonetically difficult.

Maciamo
06-07-09, 00:02
I find Arabic and Japanese languages phonetically difficult.

Japanese phonetically difficult ? For speakers of Romance languages only the "h" sound might be difficult. Other sounds exist in every languages (ok, you need to roll the "r" more gently and pinch a bit the "u", but that's it).

Marianne
06-07-09, 01:47
I think that Japanese is easy to pronnounce but japanese grammar is a bit difficult.
On the other hand, chinese is harder to pronnounce but easier in terms of grammar

I guess it depends on the main language someone has. For example it's very hard for Greeks to tell the difference between mad and mud when they hear them but very easy to pronnounce "r" like the French do since it sounds a lot like our "γ" letter. We also don't have sounds that combine vowels like oe, ae etc so it's hard for Greeks to pronnounce them.

Ancient Greek was different. It included all of those sounds and had more rythm, that is why we have different vowels or combination of vowels for the same sounds for "i" sound we have η, ι , υ , ει, οι, and for "o" we have ο and ω. In ancient Greek each of these letters was pronnounced a bit different but now we read them all the same. We still keep the correct spelling but most Greeks just learn it by heart without knowing that they are different cause of the different pronnounciation they used to have

Gary C.
09-07-09, 08:54
The only other language I can communicate in is German,which I like a lot.
I'm not at native-speaker level,though.
I live in Texas,so I hear a lot of Spanish.Don't know how it sounds when spoken by Spaniards,but I don't care for the Mexican version.Hard on the ears.
Dabbled a little with Mandarin,many years ago.Very interesting.

dmdiannemorales
30-11-10, 04:10
I love Spanish language, It's sound sweet every time I hear a conversation from spanish people.

Mzungu mchagga
30-11-10, 13:48
I'll make a very short introduction now to something completly new:

Kiswahili
likes:
-Very easy pronunciation: it uses latin alphabet, consonants are pronounced as in english, vowels as in german. only exception is gh as a pharyngal sound
-the language belongs to the Bantu branch. it's grammar is really easy, although you have to get used to it first as it differs widely from IE or semitic languages. for example it has 14 noun classes, which are bound to semantics such as persons and animals, plants, artifacts, loanwords, abstractions etc... with many exceptions. However, if you confuse these classes in practice, the language still remains comprehensible.

dilslikes:
-vocabulary is very poor. for every word there seems to be only one expression. so distinction between formal and informal language can only be made through politeness in grammatical expression. it is a very good language to simplify complex matters and thus to make them understandable. but expressing complex matters sometimes becomes a stimulating challenge.


Arabic

I skipped it after half a year due to unpronouncable sounds and too many words. The grammar however seemed to be logic. Can't say very much to it.


English

Above all my favourite, as I personally think the grammar and pronunciation is not too complicated. It is rich in words and so it has a big variety in expressing meanings. And I like the sound of it.

French

I think if I wasn't confronted with English more often and learned French at an earlier stage, it would be easier than English for me. I like the French sound, and probably as with other roman languages I hate the subjunctive.

German

Short, if it wasn't my mother tongue, I probably wouldn't learn it. Grammar and pronunciation are too complicated, the sound is the opposite of beautiful. I figured out the only time German sounds nice is when a young lady whispers it in a soft voice.

Regulus
30-11-10, 16:45
It is correct that modern English is very much a hybrid. Most sources will say that more modern English words are of Middle-French origin than of Old English. Common percentages are a little over 30% French origin and around 28% of Old English. The remainder is of direct Latin, Greek, and Brythonic Celtic input.


As a native English speaker who only has one other language (Spanish), I will comment on my likes and dislikes of that language.

The pronunciation is almost perfect. As soon as one learns the slightly different alphabet, it is nearly impossible to mispronounce a word in Spanish. The worst thing that one may occasionally do is miss on the location of which syllable gets stressed.

If one can become comfortable with the irregularly-conjugated verbs, the regular verbs are relatively easy once the English speaker can train him/herself to recall Yo, tu'. Ud. Nosotros, etc. for use is everyday speech.Spanish speakers also are pretty forgiving if you mess up!

Having dealt with a tremendously wide range of regional Spanish styles and slangs, I have to give it to the Castilian as being my favorite. I love the calm, almost methodical way that it sounds to a person who is mostly used to seemingly limitless styles from Mexico down to Tierra del Fuego and all of the islands. If I had to say what I disliked about Castilian, I would have to mention the "th" instead of the "s" sound and its absorption of many Arabic-derived words as opposed to the more conservative Portuguese, Catalan, etc. I like preserving a langauage in a manner as close to its earliest form as possible.

Reinaert
15-12-10, 19:51
I speak some languages.

Dutch: I speak the Brabant (southern Netherlands) form. I almost never speak the official Dutch. Dutch grammar is a disaster. In The Netherlands Dutch is explained by teachers as a kind of mathematic model, that almost never fits.

In my dialect I have a pretty good idea why something is female, male or neuter.
It's simply an added value to a word. Most of the time because it pronounces more fluent.

English: My second language. Easy to understand, although I sometimes have problems with urban language and American. English sounds a bit like a chello music instrument.

German, I understand it, and I speak it, but writing it is difficult.
Also there are a lot of words that I can't compare with other languages.
German can sometimes sound a bit like a machine gun.. ;)
And the very long words...
Try this (a joke)
HauptReichsAngestelter EisenbahnLinienKnotenpuntWechsel HinUndHerSchieber.
It is 1 word!
Favorite German sentence:
"Stell dich vor es gibt Krieg, und keiner geht hin!"

It's very beautiful, because it has two meanings.
1 Imagine there's a war going on, and nobody goes there.
2 Imagine there's a war going on, and nobody dies.


French. Nice language, but I use it seldom, but if spoken slowly, I can understand.

Nicest European language I would like to learn:

Italian. Almost an opera in itself. Nice melody.

Mzungu mchagga
17-12-10, 15:06
Favorite German sentence:
"Stell dich vor es gibt Krieg, und keiner geht hin!"

It's very beautiful, because it has two meanings.
1 Imagine there's a war going on, and nobody goes there.
2 Imagine there's a war going on, and nobody dies.


Yes that's a famous quote by Carl Sandburg. It's a good one! :laughing:
PS: the correct form is "Stell dir vor es ist Krieg, und keiner geht hin!"

Sybilla
28-01-11, 19:26
French sounds so chic, it is so feminine and also so familiar (most loans in Italian are from French) so I can only like it. Also speaking French men sounds so romantic!

English, I like it becouse it has got the easiest grammar of Europe. It sounds also well, but in my opinion French is more beautiful.

German is definitely what you call a viril language. I like men who speak German, but the grammar is hard and sometimes it seems that people are always angry when they speak in German.

Spanish in my opinion is not that great. Itsounds the way a stammering Italian would speaks. I prefer Portuguese.

Greek sounds well. I like it, although it sounds a bit like a machine gun (ta-ka-ta-ta-ki). But it's solar and has a long and great history, so...

Italian. I am Italian, so I dunno how this language sounds. People say that it's beautiful and melodic, but I don't understand what they mean.

Wilhelm
28-01-11, 21:12
Catalan : My native language, sounds nice to me, I don't know how it sounds to others, some people say it sounds like a mix of spanish, french and italian.

French : I don't like it that much, some of the sounds are ridiculous lol, I only like it when women speak it because it sounds delicate and feminine.

English : American english sounds very forced and ugly, I prefer british english sounds more refined and melodic, though english langauge today is seen as modern and unclassy. The language of business.

German : A very harsh language for my romance ears, sounds like they are always talking about serious things.

Spanish I like spanish, the Castilian version. Very equilibrated and harmonious language,

Italian. Sounds like they are always singing, because all the words finish with the same intonation, and when they speak very fast sounds like they are complaining and angry.

Greek I like it, sounds nice, but they speak like machines.

Portuguese I like how it sounds, it's a beatiful accent.

bud
31-01-11, 07:07
I like hearing Gaelic both Irish and Scottish.

julia90
02-03-11, 22:44
FRENCH It conveys me Tenderness. It's elegant, i like its j (sweet sounds) and also the vocals (like you find in german and northern italian dialcts). But i don't like listening to music in french. Spanish it's way much better in songs for example.

SPANISH I like it, spanish music is popular in italy (latin american music, you often listen to it played usually is summer on the beaches, with songs like Vamos a la playa, Aserejé ah ehehé; Salsa etc..). It conveys me fierceness, but not as in german (it's actually pleasing to listen to it).

PORTUGUESE I prefer spanish to it. (spanish sounds way more clear and more "pure").. portuguese is....shhshshs..eo..eu..shs..eo...ao...eu..eu..eu

ENGLISH I like it it's what i call a round languages (i don't know why it conveys me something round and joyful). I'm crazy for American English accent, "No wayyyyy" "You are a *****!!!" it's very exagerated but i like it. i like it also when it's extremely nasal too.

GERMAN it conveys me Vigour, harshness. Ich liebe dich(dick lol) sounds harsh and not romantic.

I've read always that italian seems sung, happy etc.. but i don't know why??

^ lynx ^
05-03-11, 15:32
Brazilian-portuguese: I use to listen a lot of bossa-nova music. I like it. Sounds sweet.
Italian: I find its intonation really funny.
French: Agreed with Wilhelm, I like it when women speak it. French is a language I have always related with femality.
Basque: It's harsh on the ears, primitive, most people will find it ugly... but I like it. It evoques me ancient times.
Romanian: Sounds exotic and familiar at the same time.

Regards.

Reinaert
05-03-11, 20:36
French: Agreed with Wilhelm, I like it when women speak it. French is a language I have always related with femality.

Regards.

The Foreign Legion will hunt you down, and take you to a court in Paris .. :innocent:

Angela
05-03-11, 21:10
I speak Italian(my mother tongue) and English(since I was in elementary school. I used to be fluent in French, but it has deteriorated, and now my Spanish is probably better. My Portuguese is passable. I tried to learn German in graduate school, but gave it up.

German-too gutteral and harsh, and the grammar was too difficult, or perhaps I didn't try hard enough.

French-elegant, logical language. I like it a great deal-love French songs

Spanish-it was an easy language to learn and I love Spanish poetry and music, but when it is spoken, I find the tone somewhat monotonous.

Portuguese-I love the sound of Portuguese. (I also love Fado) I found there to be more correspondence between Portuguese and Italian than between Spanish and Italian in terms of vocabulary. French also was more similar. Perhaps it is because Spanish has more arabic derived words. I also found Catalan more easily understandable than Spanish when I first went to Spain. This may all have something to do with the fact that the dialects of my area are influenced by a Celtic substratum. There are correspondences to Provencal and Occitan I think.

Italian-It's hard to be objective about your native language, but I think it's extraordinarily beautiful. The open vowels make it perfect for singing,(which is why so many composers have chosen it) and it is extraordinarily easy to rhyme in it. There are many, many words related to domestic life and to the affections. I think it is harder than it appears, especially in terms of verb usage etc. In my experience, many foreigners for example think they speak good Italian, whereas they are actually butchering it. You can tell immediately how educated a person is by the quality of their Italian, and for many students it can be a nightmare to get a good grade in it. There is a very good book on it in English by Dianne Hales called La Bella Lingua.

English-Although it is not my mother tongue, it is the language I speak and write in most frequently. I don't think any other language can compare with it in terms of the subtlety and flexibility which it provides. The sheer quantity of its vocabulary makes it a dream for writers. I have no idea how it sounds to others, although I think it has a slight Germanic quality, and so may not be as pleasing to the ear.

Riccardo
23-03-11, 16:20
It's not easy to give an answer, but I'll try to talk about the languages that I know better. :)

Italian - I think that I'm not the most indicate person to talk about a language that is the mine, so I may appear unbiased.
I think that the Italian is a great language not only for how it sounds (not too "sweet", not harsh, not sibilant and not "skinny"), but even because it has a literary tradition that is great.
What I don't like...Maybe it could appear too hard gramatically for the foreigners. It has a lot of tenses, irregular verbs and double letters.

English - I have to confess that I don't like so much this language. Even if it is perfect for music, it sounds too "chopped" at my ears, expecially when spoken in slang. And, strangely, I find it quite difficult to talk (and write).
What I like about English it's that it is immediate and it's the easiest way to communicate.

Spanish - I have to make a premise: I talk this language fluently and I hear talking in Spanish quite often. I think it's basic to make a distinction beetween Spanish-Castillan and Spanish-Latinoamerican. Contrary to the prevalent opinion, I LOVE Spanish language from Spain and I dislike the American pronunciation. I love the sound "J" and "Z" too, how it is pronunced in Spain. It is great for music and it give to girls and women a charm touch that makes me crazy.

French - I think here the fundamental distinction should be made beetween French spoken by men and French spoken by women. I love when it is spoken by women because it's SEXY. It gives to them charm, an "allure" as they would say.
If it is spoken by men it sound "too sweet". But it's always a Latin language, one of the best in the world to hear and talk for me.

Talking about languages that I don't really know:
Portuguese sounds great, but sometimes it is too "slobber".
What I can say about German it is that I don't understand ANYTHING and it doesn't sound good to me.
I really like Greek talking, but it's quite funny too.
The language I don't like at all is arabic, really harsh.

Canek
23-03-11, 20:05
Spanish - I have to make a premise: I talk this language fluently and I hear talking in Spanish quite often. I think it's basic to make a distinction beetween Spanish-Castillan and Spanish-Latinoamerican. Contrary to the prevalent opinion, I LOVE Spanish language from Spain and I dislike the American pronunciation. I love the sound "J" and "Z" too, how it is pronunced in Spain. It is great for music and it give to girls and women a charm touch that makes me crazy.

i respect your opinion but that's unfortunate. there's not a UNIQUE american pronuntiation, even in a single latin american country you can find a lot of differents pronuntiations.

i extremely dislike the spanish from spain, the S and the Z sounds like they are about to spit to you, and people in the southern pronuntiation make them sound like stupids (no offense intended).

the most beautifull spanish pronuntiations are in colombia and peru. colombian women talk soft and sweet.

Riccardo
23-03-11, 20:12
i respect your opinion but that's unfortunate. there's not a UNIQUE american pronuntiation, even in a single latin american country you can find a lot of differents pronuntiations.

i extremely dislike the spanish from spain, the S and the Z sounds like they are about to spit to you, and people in the southern pronuntiation make them sound like stupids (no offense intended).

the most beautifull spanish pronuntiations are in colombia and peru. colombian women talk soft and sweet.

You're surely right Canek, sorry if I couldn't explain me good. What I wanted to say is that in Spain they have a totally different pronunciation compared to the others in South America, and I prefer this one! :good_job:
Maybe it's even because I'm accostumed to it!

Canek
23-03-11, 20:17
Maybe it's even because I'm accostumed to it!

that's probably the main reason, it's totally understatable, you are more near to spain.

but people who knows the spanish accent, and most of the latin american accents, usually preffers the latin americans'.

Riccardo
23-03-11, 20:47
that's probably the main reason, it's totally understatable, you are more near to spain.

but people who knows the spanish accent, and most of the latin american accents, usually preffers the latin americans'.

Eheh a Spanish girl washed my brain in the past. :grin:

Triskel
23-03-11, 21:16
False. Latin americans tend to hate european spanish. Don´t generalize. That´s just your opinion sirius/canek/baldo. Obviously you don´t know that your favourite Peruvian spanish is pretty similar to our spanish.

I like the French (in girls) and celtic languages.

Cambrius (The Red)
23-03-11, 21:36
Many people I know who are familiar with various Spanish accents prefer Castilian Spanish. Most seem to consider Castilian to be clearer and easier to understand. The closest thing I have heard to Castilian in LatAm is Columbian style Spanish.

Language is language. You're going to like some and dislike others.

Melusine
24-03-11, 00:13
NO single language is without variants in their own countries.

Spain has many variants of Spanish, depending on region.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Spain


The Spanish spoken in the Americas has many indigeous words incorporated into it.
There is nothing "inherently" wrong with it.

There is no PURE language.

English even in England has it's variants in accents and dialects depending on location of the individuals.

ALL languages are influenced by: Level education of the individual(s), social status familial background, etc . The more educated a person is the more "likely" that that persons speaks their language closer to the "modal of that language (of their own country) . One's occupation also influences language. A farmer, sheep herder, coal miner, etc will have a different daily vocabulary of a given language than that of an office worker, artist, etc.

What I like about Spanish, French , Italian , Portuguese, and English, all of its variants are beautiful and pleasant to the "ear". What I don't like about them is that I can't master them. By the way I've been to Portugual, and Brazil and the Portuguese in Brazil is very "melodious" vs. the more "gutteral" mainland Portguese (to my ears).

All languages evolve and incorporate existing lexicons in their own languages. The computer age is a good examle, we are using words and phrases that did not exist bc (before computers).

To "lump" any given language as the "measuring rod" of an entire countries language and of any other country that speaks that language is simply not a fact.

I've been to Paris and have heard variants of French there, and I've been to Southwestern France, and the accent and dialects are also different than the French spoken in Paris (most of the small towns in Southwesten France, speak in a rather straight foward way.

Not all small towners speak country talk, it all depends on their education status as mentioned above.

All language is about communication, if one understands what is being communicated then that is all that matters in everyday "chatter".

Why find fault with its delivery?

Melusine

Wilhelm
24-03-11, 00:56
NO single language is without variants in their own countries.

Spain has many variants of Spanish, depending on region.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Spain
Actually these are not variants of spanish, but different languages. I am myself a native speaker of Catalan.

Mzungu mchagga
24-03-11, 02:18
The limit where to define a dialect or a language is often very fluid and socially constructed. For instance, when I listen to Swiss German I understand as much as when I listen to Dutch. Although Swiss German is considered a German dialect, while Dutch is considered a distinct western Germanic language. In fact, "High German" as it is widely spoken today in Germany, linguisticaly lies between the Alemanic (e.g. Swiss Dutch) and Netherlandic (e.g. Dutch) branch. However, Swiss Germans are also considered as ethnic Germans, while the Dutch are Dutch. So in the end the limit between dialect and language is about politics.

Riccardo
24-03-11, 02:24
The limit where to define a dialect or a language is often very fluid and socially constructed. For instance, when I listen to Swiss German I understand as much as when I listen to Dutch. Although Swiss German is considered a German dialect, while Dutch is considered a distinct western Germanic language. In fact, "High German" as it is widely spoken today in Germany, linguisticaly lies between the Alemanic (e.g. Swiss Dutch) and Netherlandic (e.g. Dutch) branch. However, Swiss Germans are also considered as ethnic Germans, while the Dutch are Dutch. So in the end the limit between dialect and language is about politics.

I agree! Even dialects have their gramatical structure..I would add that maybe a language it's just the amount of the dialects that share the same gramatical structure?
I'm quite ignorant in this subject so don't blame me if I'm wrong! :good_job:

Mzungu mchagga
24-03-11, 21:03
I agree! Even dialects have their gramatical structure..I would add that maybe a language it's just the amount of the dialects that share the same gramatical structure?
I'm quite ignorant in this subject so don't blame me if I'm wrong! :good_job:

Mmh, I think there is no ultimate rule. It seems to be really a matter of acceptance by the people whether a dialect is still considered a dialect or already different language.

Riccardo
24-03-11, 22:17
Mmh, I think there is no ultimate rule. It seems to be really a matter of acceptance by the people whether a dialect is still considered a dialect or already different language.

In the time it became as you said! :good_job:

Canek
29-03-11, 18:34
Many people I know who are familiar with various Spanish accents prefer Castilian Spanish. Most seem to consider Castilian to be clearer and easier to understand. The closest thing I have heard to Castilian in LatAm is Columbian style Spanish.

Language is language. You're going to like some and dislike others.

probably beacuse they live near to spain, and are more used to the spanish accent... but people not related to spain or latin america usually prefers some latin american accents like colombian or peruvian..

Reinaert
31-03-11, 22:15
The limit where to define a dialect or a language is often very fluid and socially constructed. For instance, when I listen to Swiss German I understand as much as when I listen to Dutch. Although Swiss German is considered a German dialect, while Dutch is considered a distinct western Germanic language. In fact, "High German" as it is widely spoken today in Germany, linguisticaly lies between the Alemanic (e.g. Swiss Dutch) and Netherlandic (e.g. Dutch) branch. However, Swiss Germans are also considered as ethnic Germans, while the Dutch are Dutch. So in the end the limit between dialect and language is about politics.

Well, The Dutch are surely related to Rheinland people. Or you could better say Rheinland is Dutch. Köln is very Dutch.

sparkey
31-03-11, 22:24
Well, The Dutch are surely related to Rheinland people. Or you could better say Rheinland is Dutch. Köln is very Dutch.

Here (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5b/Continental_West_Germanic_languages.png) is a good map of dialects of West Germanic languages around Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. There is some spillover of Dutch into the area just north of Köln.

For what it's worth, my German-speaking ancestors would have spoken Alemannic & Franconian dialects. I actually find that I like the sound of those dialects rather well, better than standard German, or Saxon dialects, which I have also heard. Probably just bias from me, though.

Reinaert
31-03-11, 23:15
Here (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5b/Continental_West_Germanic_languages.png) is a good map of dialects of West Germanic languages around Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. There is some spillover of Dutch into the area just north of Köln.

For what it's worth, my German-speaking ancestors would have spoken Alemannic & Franconian dialects. I actually find that I like the sound of those dialects rather well, better than standard German, or Saxon dialects, which I have also heard. Probably just bias from me, though.

It's a good map.
I am from the south of the Netherlands, and I can understand the language of the Ripuarian Franks in the Rheinland without a problem.
The point is, my ancestors are partly Salian Franks or Salii.

I am a Celt from my father's side, and a Franc from my mother's side.

Mzungu mchagga
01-04-11, 00:12
Unfortunatly I speak standard German only, and I do feel a little ashamed about it :ashamed2:

I grew up in the area where Hessian dialect is spoken, which to some degree is often considerd as the "in-between-dialect" of everything. Even though I don't speak it by myself I do understand it very well and also have no trouble with understanding most of all other dialects.

sparkey
01-04-11, 00:35
Unfortunatly I speak standard German only, and I do feel a little ashamed about it :ashamed2:

I grew up in the area where Hessian dialect is spoken, which to some degree is often considerd as the "in-between-dialect" of everything. Even though I don't speak it by myself I do understand it very well and also have no trouble with understanding most of all other dialects.

I have taken a couple of classes where we were taught only standard German, but the place I think I'd most like to visit in the German-speaking world is Switzerland. How much would those classes actually help me? :embarassed:

Mzungu mchagga
01-04-11, 00:43
I have taken a couple of classes where we were taught only standard German, but the place I think I'd most like to visit in the German-speaking world is Switzerland. How much would those classes actually help me? :embarassed:

That's no problem because everyone in Switzerland is able to speak standard German, and all the formal writing, also in shops, is in standard German, too. Only when they talk among themselves you probably won't understand a single word. :laughing:

loladunas
12-04-11, 01:26
probably beacuse they live near to spain, and are more used to the spanish accent... but people not related to spain or latin america usually prefers some latin american accents like colombian or peruvian..

Its your opinion, to me spain´s spanish retains a certain solemnity that latinamerican hasn´t, you can call it harsh or monotony, as i can call the "sweetness" of latinamerican spanish lack of consistency, all depends on your prejudices. I love the way of speaking of colombian or venezuelan women (and i´m a woman too) for exemple, but i think the spanish in Latin America lost masculinity, I don´t know why intonation in Spain is much more masculine, more grave, so, for a woman, ok, i´m with you, maybe l.A spanish, for a man 100% spanish from Spain (except cuban, more masculine than the rest of LA).

Carlitos
12-04-11, 01:41
True, the American people mens speak Spanish as well, as very little women, very sweet, short, is a problem, because you never know what your mood. Why men speak our language as schoolgirls or sweet princesses?

Canek
23-04-11, 23:29
to me cuban accent is the worst of spanish accents. but for the rest of latin americans, they are ahead of spain's accent... in male or in female.

Brett142
06-06-11, 06:24
I really don't like the way the French 'R' sounds when they sing, it makes the language sound really ugly - which it of course is not!

Gusar
16-09-11, 16:20
I quite like English. Without actually knowing, I would simply guess that English has the widest vocabulary in the world. My friends in Serbia also like English (just phonetically), particularly with the American accent. Personally I find the American accent the nicest and definitely clearest of the English accents. However I can not stand when Europeans have an American accent. All Europeans somehow sound better with an English accent. The most disgusting language for me is Arabic, followed very closely by German. My God, German is just horrible. It sounds almost evil at times. I'm sure that Satan would be a German speaker.... Oh, and French is definitely the most beautiful sounding language overall. Most of the English world would definitely say that English spoken with a French accent is also the most beautiful. That language just sounds so beautiful. It's my dream to learn it. I also like Spanish but not Italian or Portuguese so much.

Brett142
25-10-11, 08:09
French - I can almost see why people think it's a 'beautiful' language but when it's sung, it sounds awful! It's something to do with that harsh 'R' sound and the way they pronounce their 'Es' it doesn't flow at all. Of course native French speakers won't notice this because they know the meaning behind the word. Just like I am sure English isn't everyones cup of tea in song but I personally think it sounds way better than any other language sung - apart from maybe Spanish, but Spanish just has this different quality.

Maciamo
25-10-11, 11:44
French - I can almost see why people think it's a 'beautiful' language but when it's sung, it sounds awful!

I am a native French speaker and I wholeheartedly agree with you. As a teenager many French songs got on my nerves (here is one (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLqd_uXQLeI) that I particularly hated). I felt almost like an allergic reaction. That's partly why I never turned on the radio and was happy to go live in non-Francophone countries for nearly a decade. I am not saying that French songs have the monopoly of mediocrity. For example Japanese (and most East Asian) songs generally suck, but they don't get on my nerves in the same way. German, Dutch or Scandinavian languages sound terrible too in pop music (although German can sound good in folk music), but isn't annoying like French can be (ok, Dutch can be pretty irritating as well).

I think that English is the language that sounds best when sung, and it is surely when it is so popular, even among non-English speakers worldwide. Languages like Italian, Spanish, Russian and Hindi are also quite melodious. Hebrew and Arabic, which sound very harsh when spoken, can be quite nice when sung (especially by women).


It's something to do with that harsh 'R' sound and the way they pronounce their 'Es' it doesn't flow at all.

The harsh 'r' and other consonants would be why German doesn't sound good when sung. The reason I don't like sung French is that it often sounds too high-pitched, soft, whiny, lamenting all at the same time (like a capricious little girl). The few French singers that I can tolerate all have low-pitched and very masculine voices by French standards and interestingly are all from my parents or grandparents' generation (like Michel Sardou, Serge Lama or Charles Aznavour, or even Edith Piaf who is low-pitched for a woman). I can't think of any French-speaking singer under 50 years old that I like.

Gavroche
25-10-11, 12:47
The reason I don't like sung French is that it often sounds too high-pitched, soft, whiny, lamenting all at the same time (like a capricious little girl).
The few French singers that I can tolerate all have low-pitched and very masculine voices by French standards
French standards?
Which one?
Polnareff?
Cristophe?
Patrique Juvet?
They stopped to sing since 30 years and they was not a "standard"...


like Michel Sardou, Serge Lama
They are the worst singers, poor lyrics and poor music and sing for old women...



I can't think of any French-speaking singer under 50 years old that I like.

Maybe because they are the only french singers you know...

Maciamo
25-10-11, 13:27
They are the worst singers, poor lyrics and poor music

I don't care much for music in general (except classical), much less for French songs... Songs lyrics are almost always stupid or shallow in any song. You can't convey anything deep or factual through a few sung words. You need to write a well researched book. In my eyes the most stupid and useless activity humans have ever created is poetry, which is completely devoid of hard facts. Songs come close to that.

zanipolo
26-10-11, 12:04
I dislike the artificial language called Italian ( Italian a dialect of regional languages which are dialects of Latin ) that Dante created in the 13th Century, a language by which he toured around Italy gathering words from all the regional languages and creating this Italian. The problem/issue is not the way it was done, but what it has become now, a system where people from whichever region runs/work ( has the majority ) the media influences the "mode/type" of Italian spoken on the TV. By mode I mean , the regional linguistic influence comes out in the TV language.

The only true part of Italy that speaks the Italian created ( some say pure ) would be the southern Tuscan area of Siena.

Even to this day , movies are made in regional languages, which is not a bad thing as I believe a llanguage should never be lost.

Far better is to run the regional languages in primary school and Italian language in secondary school - people , young people have the capacity to learn many languages with ease.

Mzungu mchagga
26-10-11, 23:24
I don't care much for music in general (except classical), much less for French songs... Songs lyrics are almost always stupid or shallow in any song. You can't convey anything deep or factual through a few sung words. You need to write a well researched book. In my eyes the most stupid and useless activity humans have ever created is poetry, which is completely devoid of hard facts. Songs come close to that.

Maybe poetry and song lyrics are not only written to convey other people about some plain information, but also to evoke emotions. I like it for example when it's witty and humourous, but also when through a certain choice of words a previous plain information is transformed into a precisely targeted emotion. For me personally it is a wonderful type of art. When it's done well! On the other hand I agree that about 95% or more of all recent lyrics and poems are BS.

julia90
27-10-11, 21:35
I dislike the artificial language called Italian ( Italian a dialect of regional languages which are dialects of Latin ) that Dante created in the 13th Century, a language by which he toured around Italy gathering words from all the regional languages and creating this Italian. The problem/issue is not the way it was done, but what it has become now, a system where people from whichever region runs/work ( has the majority ) the media influences the "mode/type" of Italian spoken on the TV. By mode I mean , the regional linguistic influence comes out in the TV language.

The only true part of Italy that speaks the Italian created ( some say pure ) would be the southern Tuscan area of Siena.

Even to this day , movies are made in regional languages, which is not a bad thing as I believe a llanguage should never be lost.

Far better is to run the regional languages in primary school and Italian language in secondary school - people , young people have the capacity to learn many languages with ease.

i think langauge with accent on tv is fisologic

btw an off topic.. have you seen this video on italian dialects? :-) i like it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11TLf2YHyQw

this spots are about italian with regional heavy cadence, not dialects

Roman

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5uXqBbO-kc

Turinese

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Pp4ufNLKF4&feature=related

Tuscan

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iXUdMORcg38&feature=related

Venetian

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPTRQ8LZiYA&feature=related

Milanese 1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYfDE3RZzAs&feature=related

Milanese 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQv7A-5lSlA&feature=related

Sicilian

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIRpan8AmSY&feature=related

Calabrese

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8VLUwMLlCg&feature=related

Bolognese

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZUe4jX_liE&feature=related

julia90
27-10-11, 22:05
Speaking about romance langauages, i like spoken French mostly, then comes spanish, i don't like spoken portuguese or romanian.

In songs i don't like french, i like sometimes spanish mostly and portuguese, also romanian when sung is better than french

Goga
27-10-11, 23:22
My favourite European languages are:

1. Italian
2. French
3. German
4. Portuguese
5. Dutch / Russian

Of all European languages I do speak Russian and Dutch like my own native language and a little bit of English, French and German...

ElHorsto
28-10-11, 00:46
My favourites: 1. Italian: Most elegant and aesthetic sound. Its a fun to listen to. Vocals and Vowels interchange. But it can become annoying after longer time.
2. Swedish: I tried to learn it, because I find it to be the most neat and beautiful of all germanic languages. A peculiarity is that the melody of the voice pitch is important for spoken words.
3. Serbo-Croat: A less popular language of which I understand a few words. Every word sounds clear and marked. This language makes just fun. I was told it is the best language for swearing. Other slavic languages sound quite different superficially, despite similar vocabularies.
4. English: Very handy, short and flexible. I don't like the often fuzzy pronunciation, which makes it difficult to understand, especially when spoken by people of other mother tongues or dialects. Also I often don't like the many different ways of expressing one-and-the same thing.
5. Russian: It is a rather concise language. But way too complicated. It has 6 cases and every second word starts with a prefix like 'pri', 'pro', 'pod', 'u', 's', 'po', 'do', 'v' etc. Thats makes me confuse the words. Well, german words have many prefixes too.
6. German: My mother language. probably the worst nightmare of most belcanto opera singers.

Mzungu mchagga
28-10-11, 19:29
What english sounds to non-english speakers:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZXcRqFmFa8

Mzungu mchagga
28-10-11, 19:32
What german sounds to non-german speakers:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4UhJpviVYg

Soriori
28-10-11, 20:23
I am Russian and I can analyse only English, French, and German as I can speak and still learn more about these languages.

It has to be noted that a complicated grammer and being deficult to learn, it's two defferent category related to a language.


1) English it has a simple grammer but for me it's quite dificult to speak properly, just because of that. There are so many phrases constructed very easy, so I often think:"there must be something wrong with it " and adding some aditional words I often ruin the sentence.
But as you getting better in it, it start being quite handy to use such short scheme to explane something without using excessive words. This language is very conveniant for business and formal correspondence. Though I always feel a bit uncomfortable, like something's off, as if I coudn't describe things as lively as I'd like.
(I like the most British English, like someone above said it's sounds grandeur, and often even arrogant to my russian ear. lol) Hey,... and short words brilliant!!:good_job:

2) French (it's my favorite one, there is no other more elegant and beautiful language for me^^). I like French when speaken by men, by women, slowly, quick, in songs or not, even by drunken men, it sounds fabulous to me. (a little off topic:rolleyes2:)

Ok, it has more complecated grammar than English but still not such complex as German, for instance. It's formal style doesn't very stand out from informal. it can be can perfectly used for business, and I can say it could interchange English in that issue.
Maybe English have more vocabulary but it sounds strange to me, because learning French I've noticed that English, German, and Russian don't have such a big amount of synonyms as this one. While speaking with the French I rarely leasten to the same word twice.
Looking through my english dictionaries I find many words which aren't used in the speech at all, but I still find new words I don't know while speaking with the French.

Then, despite more complex grammer, with French I feel like I can say all that I want right, because everything has it's own ruler or an exception to remember. So French is easier for me to learn then English. It's true I confuse the gender often, because Russian have other gender for many French words. It was hard for me to understan how can а "mountain" be musculine when I clearly see it's feminime!:annoyed:" Now I'm used to it and my mistakes are decreasing.

It's quite strange but there is one more thing about French. As I speak English or German I constantly subconsciously think how to say exactly what I want to say, by which means it's translated into these languages, but when I speak French I just say what I want to say and it sounds correctly! We have very similar syntaxe, even many idioms looks the same. it's just amazing! So in French I feel myself very comfortable.
short words are brilliant as well!!!

3) German. In general to the Russians not familiar with German it sounds very rude and even scaring (like dog’s burking). And it's really a big surprise for us when some foreigners say they can't tell apart Russian and German. But there are many Russians who love this language (including myself). If the personne doesn't scream, and just joyfully talk to someone to my ear it's like cats' purring. Especially all the s, d,t and sch sounds.

German it's a great language, it's philosophers and economists' language I'd say. It has rich vocabulary and a sophisticated formal style so it's very fit for business relations, despite being more dificult to learn then English or French.

It's grammer has even more big level of сomplexity, and I truly like it.
Unfortunately most of the words are long and aren't easy to remember. But it's interesting to see the parts which combine words. In this language knowing the rules you can create new words by yourself^^
It's very different from Russian in the terms of syntax. In my point of views it's grammer has many inexplicable things, compared to French where almost everything can be cleared. But still it's a great language.:grin:



Well being Russian, I don't want to analyse my own language. :embarassed:



I also think about study Italian or Sweden.

Italian is rather funny I can’t listen to it without smiling. It sounds like when children in school, at language class, don’t know some foreign word they have to use, they often invent it on their own, Italian is all like that to me! Lol

Sweden often reminds me of German with french pronunciation, a very interesting combination ^^.

PaschalisB
18-01-12, 15:25
English: Rich vocabulary, easy grammar, but with lots of phrasal verbs, irregularities and idioms. The fact we are surrounded by it makes it much easier though.

Spanish: Beautiful and easy sounds (I prefer latin american spanish, because the castillian "z" sounds too annoying sometimes), but not so easy grammar (subjunctive, verbs with prepositions, reflective verbs come to mind). Not the easiest language to learn, but not hard either.

Italian: The intonation makes it very annoying to my ears. I prefer spanish, sorry.

Portuguese: The sounds remind me a lot of "rural" greek, so I only see it as a rural version of spanish (no offence, it sounds exactly as a greek old man from a village would pronounce spanish)

German: I'm currently learning it. The sounds are a bit harsh, but I like them in general. The grammar isn't that difficult for a native greek speaker (similar cases, three genders, not so many tenses) The only real difficulty is the memorisation of genders, since they differ from the greek ones.

Dutch: Very unpleasant to my ear.

French: I was taught a bit of it back in school. I like the sounds of it, but the grammar is ridiculously difficult. Plus the way they pronounce words much different than the way they are written gives it an extra point of difficulty.

Russian/Ukrainian/Belarusian: I don't like their sounds at all. The grammar is also difficult from what I've read so I wouldn't bother more.

West and south slavic languages: Too harsh sounds

Norwegian/Swedish: I lived in north Norway for some months in the past and I got used to the language. I like the sounds very much and the grammar is probably the easiest in Europe. Very hard to pronounce the words correctly though.

Arabic: I love the alphabet, I hate the sounds. I have to recognise that it has the richest vocabulary of all languages and maybe the most complex grammar as well. That makes me demotivated to learn more about it.

Chinese: I like the sounds, since they are very exotic to my ears.

Japanese: I like the sounds even more than chinese. I would like to learn more sometime in future.

Riki
24-03-12, 20:11
FRENCH It conveys me Tenderness. It's elegant, i like its j (sweet sounds) and also the vocals (like you find in german and northern italian dialcts). But i don't like listening to music in french. Spanish it's way much better in songs for example.

SPANISH I like it, spanish music is popular in italy (latin american music, you often listen to it played usually is summer on the beaches, with songs like Vamos a la playa, Aserejé ah ehehé; Salsa etc..). It conveys me fierceness, but not as in german (it's actually pleasing to listen to it).

PORTUGUESE I prefer spanish to it. (spanish sounds way more clear and more "pure").. portuguese is....shhshshs..eo..eu..shs..eo...ao...eu..eu..eu

ENGLISH I like it it's what i call a round languages (i don't know why it conveys me something round and joyful). I'm crazy for American English accent, "No wayyyyy" "You are a *****!!!" it's very exagerated but i like it. i like it also when it's extremely nasal too.

GERMAN it conveys me Vigour, harshness. Ich liebe dich(dick lol) sounds harsh and not romantic.

I've read always that italian seems sung, happy etc.. but i don't know why??

How do you define If a Language is more Pure?And what does that mean a Language being more pure then another?

Carlos
25-03-12, 02:33
Aesthetically the ones I like are not in order of preference: Italian, French and Spanish in Spain, Latin Spanish, Mexico and many others.

I like English because I love the English Pop, but now I'm learning English with the google translator, cheaper than a thousand English words, as I see it is more schematic or perhaps avoid further entanglement or power, it may be wrong through ignorance, maybe I'd learn it well because I do not like talking too much.

I also like the German, though a few years ago I had to cross a wire and started not to distinguish too well between German and Arabic. The Portuguese in the songs is beautiful, spoken is very intense, like a good cheese, I speak very much exhausted. I have heard foreigners pronounce better Spanish are the Greeks.

The Basque is not ugly at all. Other languages ​​derived from Latin, Galician, Catalan and Italian have appeared, but it was not, I think just horrible to hear, sorry.

Boss
25-03-12, 02:56
Spanish is my favourite language though I do not speak it myself (soon, however, I will)

I am trying to learn German (had taken private lessons in it when I was younger + we did some in school), French and Japanese only because I am interested (who isn't) in the these cultures in general. French sounds gay and German and Japanese sound funny.

Chinese sounds annoying (I'm sorry guys!), Russian sounds mildly cool. Italian sounds fine as well but nothing to get too excited about! Same goes for Swedish and Norwegian.

Hal Fao
25-03-12, 09:13
I like Italian (especially Tuscan) for its pure and distinct sounds as well as for its musicality too. Greek and Albanian sound very exotic to my ears. English is my favourite, but I don't like American accent.

LeBrok
25-03-12, 09:36
Can you elaborate how come Albanian sounds exotic to you? Isn't it your first language?

Hal Fao
25-03-12, 17:35
Can you elaborate how come Albanian sounds exotic to you? Isn't it your first language?
Well, you're right LeBrok, Albanian is my first language and I was born and used to live in Toskan Albania up till 2005. Now I live in an area where is Gheg Albanian in use (more than 2/3 of Albanians are ghegs) whose vocabolary is mainly a monosyllabic one (it is unique in all IE languages). Believe me, it sounds quite an exotic one!

Riki
25-03-12, 19:00
English-I've been learning for a long time 20 Years or more.I like the British English(Proper not chavs)and I like to read in Old English.
German and most of It's derived languages sound harsh to me ears.
Italian melodic.
Spanish(Castille) I listen to It to often:grin:I like the literature.I like the sound of Catalan and Galician.
Don't like the sound of French very much.

hope
25-03-12, 19:31
Spanish is my favourite language though I do not speak it myself (soon, however, I will)

I am trying to learn German (had taken private lessons in it when I was younger + we did some in school), French and Japanese only because I am interested (who isn't) in the these cultures in general. French sounds gay and German and Japanese sound funny.

Chinese sounds annoying (I'm sorry guys!), Russian sounds mildly cool. Italian sounds fine as well but nothing to get too excited about! Same goes for Swedish and Norwegian.

LOL!! How does French sound "gay"? Hello Boss by the way :)

L.D.Brousse
25-03-12, 21:47
I like the German Language mostly because I know more about it than the others I half ass learned in military service. Plus I live in a German community with Street names like Sontag Weinbach and such I learned a lot of German from My Grandfather Schwarz. Most German Americans in my area spoke it in the house for many generations after coming here. My Grandfather is not fluent in it mostly due to his age group and WW2 but he knows a lot of it. His dad and Grandfather spoke it all the time. During would war 2 they leased German "Afrika Korp" Prisoners of war to work on the family's tobacco farm. And Grandfather said. His dad talked in German to them. Both of my neighbors to the home I own and grew up in spoke it fluently So German is the most contact I have with my European roots even though My blood contains the DNA From France England Scotland Germany. Plus who could pass up a local Bier Stube or Folk Fest. I did get to Germany 2 times once on the way to Iraq the other after a medical evacuation from Iraq to Landstuhl army medical center in 2008 I was on a stretcher did not get to enjoy it

hope
25-03-12, 23:33
Yes, I like the German language too L.D. but only have limited knowledge of it. I can pick my way through some things written in German but I`m afraid that`s not very good and of little use.

L.D.Brousse
25-03-12, 23:49
I wish I would have taken it in school but I did not I can understand more of it than I can write But it's use of for example Die Der Das I can count as fast in German as I can in English and I know lots of words. But not enough to function. I do not like Spanish "nothing against Spain" But here in the states they are cramming it down our throats to accommodate illegals coming from Mexico. America is a English speaking nation but it seems someone forgot

Boss
26-03-12, 00:27
LOL!! How does French sound "gay"? Hello Boss by the way :)

Haha hello, I don't know how but it does. I can't explain it.

Brett142
25-05-12, 08:25
I am a native English speaker, I've learned French since I was 11, German since I was 12, Spanish in university and Italian for a year during university.

SPANISH - By far my most favourite foreign language. I love how you could teach Spanish pronunciation to an (intelligent) person in like 10 minutes, and they would never miss pronounce a word ever again. I adore the pronunciation of their consonants, they all seem to be softened-down versions of English ones. I love how D and T become near enough TH(at) and TH(in), how G becomes in words like agua, almost sounds like 'owwa'. Guatemala is the best way I can describe it, it ends up sounding like Wathaymala. I also think Spanish is the most beautiful sounding language especially in music. I think it has to do with their extremely short amount of vowel sounds so they just repeat the same ones over and over.
DISLIKE - I think this must just be because I'm English but I find their verb conjugation and use of things like the subjunctive an absolute NIGHTMARE! Also I hate the Spain-Spanish pronunciation of the soft C and Z and the harshness of soft G and J. I like it in (I don't know which country) South America where C/Z are like S and G/J are like H. Also gender, I really don't see what giving a door or a chair a gender achieves. Finally Spaniards talk fast!

GERMAN - I'm actually quite fond of this language, I was drawn to it first I guess because the simpler, beginner vocabulary is very similar to English. German is actually how I got in to etymology. I love the 'CH' sound in particular but just the general sound of it. I can see why people think it's ugly and by all means it's no Spanish, but I actually like the sound of it. Compared to other Germanic languages I think it sounds funky (Dutch sounds bloody awful and the Scandinavians really just sound alien to me). I also love how clear-sounding it is, you could hear a sound and 95% write it down correctly.
DISLIKE - Again because I'm English, the grammar. I do appreciate the relative simplicity of verb conjugation compared to say French or Spanish but back to the gender thing again, GERMAN HAS THREE grrrrr!! Also I would like to KILL the Dative, nominative, genitive and accusative.

FRENCH - I think I have a bit of a love hate relationship with French to be perfectly honest. To me it looks aesthetically pleasing, I like all the silent letters at the end of the words. I also LOVE how ridiculously easy it is to understand written French.
DISLIKE - I don't really understand why it got this reputation of being the most beautiful language, 'cause it ain't! I mean, by no means is it an ugly language on the whole. For me he 'R' sound and 'U' sound are particularly ugly in music, also I hate how they pronounce the final 'E' in songs, ugly. Also when spoken, I think more often than not it sounds pompous, pretentious and snobby, a bit like RP English. And again, the verbs man, why do they have to be so complicated! Finally I find it hard a lot of the time to understand it when spoken, a lot of time it seems very slurred and unclear.

ITALIAN - I took this subject as an extra option in my second year of university and boy do I regret it! I thought with its similarities to Spanish that I'd love it but I really just hated it, the pronunciation especially. I can't quite put my finger on it, but I didn't like it. Luckily though having studied Spanish and French, I found that I already knew basic Italian without even knowing it ^^.

MANDARIN - Literally sounds like the Martians have landed, sounds so weird and bumpy and awkward

MALAY - The only Asian language I've ever liked the sound of. Strangely it has a real European feel about it, but when either sung or spoken, it's music to my ears ;).

RUSSIAN - Sounds really really comical

SLAVIC LANGUAGES - They all sound really dirty and harsh to me, not nice at all. Up there with Dutch.

PORTUGUESE - To me they did the impossible, make a romance language sound 100% ugly, I think it's all the ZH and CH sounds and that harsh Slavic-like 'L'.....ugly

DUTCH - Ugliest looking and ugliest sounding language I've ever had the misfortune to come across. Nothing against the people of course, Dutch people by far the best speakers of English outside the UK/US.

ENGLISH - My native tongue and by far my most favourite language. I love how simple our conjugation is because I don't see the point in the complications of Latin-based languages, for me they don't achieve anything. Same with genders - pointless and cases - pointless. I love how we have so many tenses, means we can be so precise about things. Along with our rich vocab, it makes story telling that much more interesting and intriguing I think. I love how our spelling sometimes has no rules i.e. enough, tough, cough, borough, through etc. I like how English looks on paper, it certainly managed to inherit a lot of aesthetically eye-pleasing qualities from French. Also I believe English is superior when it comes to music. To me other languages only seem to be good in a specific genre, for example French rock sounds terrible and German ballads sound like a nightmare. English I find is good across the board (maybe because English speakers invented most types of modern music). I don't think it is necessarily the most beautiful sounding language but in music, I don't know, it just has that je-ne-sais-quoi, the open vowel sounds which we can drag out, the final consonant sounds we can drop and our high percentage of one syllable words. I'm just so proud that the language of people who live on a teeny tiny island, tucked away off Europe's coast, has come to dominate the world.
DISLIKE - Some UK Spelling. centre, litre etc - doesn't make sense to me. We got the word enter from the French too but we don't spell it entre. Also the word manoeuvre pisses me off.


LEAST FAVOURITE ACCENTS - The South African, Birmingham, Southern-US and Scottish accents, along with really harsh Australian accents. They all sound really ugly, I actually can't even listen to South Africans, it bothers me that much. To me they sound like foreign people who learned to speak English in Australia
MOST FAVOURITE ACCENTS - Geordie (very melodic, friendly and inviting), West Country, African-American (So expressive and frankly hilarious) and finally Jamaican.

Peace out Y

Sybilla
18-07-12, 16:08
Italian. Sounds like they are always singing, because all the words finish with the same intonation, and when they speak very fast sounds like they are complaining and angry.



Really? I have never heard that Italian sounds angry, this is interesting.

Amory Blaine
03-09-12, 02:37
Well, as a fairly advanced native English speaker I am clearly quite biased, but I will nevertheless make an attempt to come off somewhat fair with the languages I have studied.

Spanish
I think that Spanish should be made the universal language due to its simplicity of pronunciation, easy grammar, and ingrained beauty (as an American I can't comment on Spanish Spanish, but South American Spanish is fairly colloquial in the US). Though I honestly don't know of an easier language, Spanish does have "Don Quixote" (arguably the greatest work of literature yet) to speak of its capacity for the sublime.
Italian
Don't know it well, but it seems a bit prettier than Spanish and less "exclusive" than French. I'll be going to Rome soon so I should probably study it more.
Russian
This is the language of ambivalence for me. First off the bad: the vocabulary is very, very difficult for a native English speaker to learn. Now the good: I love it so much, I would speak it colloquially if everyone around me could understand because it has a "sincerity" that other languages don't seem to have (besides maybe Spanish). It also shares with English the body of outstanding literature, and for some reason it seems all the Russians I know are far more learned than Americans. Not sure why that is, perhaps something to do with upper-class immigration? It is complex grammatically, though it seems the verbs are a bit lacking as far as intricacy is concerned. This isn't really a bad thing, though. Overall, love Russian. Probably my second favorite contemporary tongue.
Latin
The language of the law! Latin is my favorite to read, my favorite to speak, my favorite to study and my favorite to have knowledge of (much of English vocabulary is Latin). It was the language of the intellectuals.Unfortunately, its students have surpassed the old magister himself so I don't really ever speak it with anybody. Tis rather fun to leave cryptic notes, however. I've always said that knowing whether a technical English term was Latin or Greek based was a matter of the following: Greek=fun sounding, Latin=powerful sounding. The most powerful empire ever (or maybe second if you are a Mongol fan) is echoed by the power of this ancient language. Though as an afterthought, nothing sounds more innocent...or perhaps more burlesque than some of the stories of the Roman family in "Lingua Latina." A truly great language that has stood the test of time through its influences.
French
Don't know much about French, though I've heard its easy to learn but very difficult to master. I think its sexy (think Cotillard) but in a much different way than Spanish. I think that it is typical American stereotype to classify the French as a passionate people, so I can't vouch for the accuracy of this viewpoint.
German
I just don't like German very much. The sound isn't too pretty, and thankfully as I think Germany's days as an intellectual and artistic center of the world are over. Economic, not so much, but English dominates it in this field anyway. English just seems to be the better, in my opinion, of the Germanic tongues. It doesn't help German's reputation that about half of Germans speak English. I only expect that number to grow.
English
I saved this for last, as it is my favorite and the one I have the deepest understanding of. The vocabulary is unmatched, the grammatical freedom is profound, and the worldliness is convenient. Its the best language to know, and though that may change, I'm sticking with it. Most of the best literature is in English (check various top 100 book lists). I won't say anything more about English, but that the more I learn other languages, the more clearly I see that English stands apart and above in flexibility and breadth. I'm getting redundant and sensationalist, so I'll just stop now.

Riccardo
03-09-12, 20:59
It seems that many people find difficult to study Italian. I can perfectly understand why, the grammar for a foreigner is really difficult!
I prefer Latin languages anyway. French and Spanish are the best, melodious, sexy for women and charming. I guess Italian would sound similar if I wasn't mother tongue. I don't like English, but we must study it (and I still speak a worse English than my great Spanish, also with many more years of studies).

Endri
03-09-12, 23:30
It seems that many people find difficult to study Italian. I can perfectly understand why, the grammar for a foreigner is really difficult!
I prefer Latin languages anyway. French and Spanish are the best, melodious, sexy for women and charming. I guess Italian would sound similar if I wasn't mother tongue. I don't like English, but we must study it (and I still speak a worse English than my great Spanish, also with many more years of studies).

I don't understand why so many people think Italian is hard. My personal opinion is that Italian is one of the easiest languages and the most easy Latin language.

Spanish is very similar to Italian. Knowing one enables you to understand the other. Furthermore, both Italian and Spanish have a pretty much straight forward accent.

AdeoF
07-03-13, 00:26
Spanish

likes: The language has a mix of macho and romanticism inside which makes the language nice to hear. (please don't talk about how they pronounce the j it is bad). Also the phonology sounds a lot like Latin, Italian and also Greek.

Dislikes: It has a lot of Arabic words (which is 8% in Spanish language) and it separates with Italian and French, and yea the J sound. Also it's too related to Portuguese.

French

likes: Sound lovely and also has a different point of path from the other Romance languages which makes it interesting.

Dislikes: Too much Germanic needs more Latin inside and also the language looks hard to learn.

Italian

Likes: It has the most Latin words and also has good relations with other romance languages. the phonology is really nice and sounds a lot like Spanish. It sounds more feminine then the other romance languages.

Dislikes: There's not much words with Italian e.g. h and y, and also some of the words are odd and also can't link up the the para in Spanish and Portuguese

Galician (home language with Spanish)

likes: It's very historical and has joined in with the other romance languages. It's old fashioned as well. The Celt words in Galician sounds nice.

Dislikes: Has got little to no Celt words in Galician. It's well.... Portuguese version 2

Portuguese

Likes: It has a lot of history inside and also it has a good mix of phonology and vocab.

Dislikes: phonology sounds like your voice is a bit blocked and also when your reading it. It's a lot like Spanish.

German

likes: The language sounds powerful with a lot of words coming from Germanic side and has been in use a lot in different parts of Europe.

Dislikes: it's too far away from English/Scots and also it's not an easy language to learn.

English

likes: Very rich vocab, it can take in a lot of words and be used anywhere which is useful and also it's more easier to learn then the other Germanic languages.

Dislikes: It's has too many words which is from Latin/French ,Greek and other languages which separate from the other Germanic languages.

Francisus
07-03-13, 03:20
I only like english and spanish because those are the only ones I can understand haha

^stupid answer I alrdy know

martinmkp
07-03-13, 08:19
What is a very interesting, that "sound" of the language varies according to your native language or the place you have been living or lived. Also, "judging" the language is based on a very subjective grounds.

For example, some people do not like several sounds (or language itself) which are strange - in Portuguese, Dutch, Finnish, or some other languages. On the contrary, they tend to like theirs own languages. This is natural. But, try to explain to the native Dutch person that his language is not nice!

What I want to mention is, that the more distant (geographically) the language is from the core of its group origin, the more specifically sounds (or has more difficult sounds for other listeners) - compare the German with the Dutch (more difficalt sounds), or Spanish to Portuguese (more difficult sounds), or Czech to Russian (more soft and difficult with some objections).

I have, on the contrary, a very seldom heard that Italian would sound not nice to other people. It si considered as a nice, not difficult language. Why it is so?

I personally like German. That is probably because my grandfather who raised me, spoke German as his native language. But, many Slovaks do not like the sound of German (without any negative connotations toward the nation). I do not like Russian, for example - it sound to me too soft and strange.

English - is quite neutral for me, and I consider it only as a mixture of anglo-saxon, normandian, latin influences. I think the English language was not able to receive the latin alphabet properly - therefore there is so many discrepancies between written and spoken language. The American English is moving those discrepancies to the higher level - and still developing :)

Spanish and Italian - sounds very nice to me... learning Spanish has been easy until the gramma...
French - culturally, yes, it was the language of high society, culture, the civilisation itself. But, frankly, I do not like the sound of it (those very fluent in French would beat me!)
Greek - a very nice, special language, although different form it old greek grandfather.
Japanese versus Chinese - definitely I think Japanese is simplier and easier. Chinese is simple only to the extent of the beginner (Wo yao ni 我要伱). And those terrible chinese sounds - saying four tones for ma... with different meanings. But, taking into account such a vast chinese culture, reading the old manuscripts gives the reader the completely new dimension, great dimension as well:)

Nordsee
03-05-13, 13:38
I just speak 2 languages: German and English.

German: My mother tongue. Very specific language, powerful, hard grammar, often hard to learn for foreigners (I like that). It might not be the nicest language to hear and as many of you say it might sound "harsh", but I don't understand when people say it always sounds like Germans are angry or are argueing. I hear and read this very often. To me it's the best language. Ok, maybe because it's my mother tongue, but I just like it.

Austrian German: I like the dialect spoken in Vienna. I dislike the rest.

Swiss German: Awful. It's very awful to hear and even to read. You think German has too many "ch" sounds? Just listen to Swiss German.

English: I started to learn it when I was 12 years old I guess. Was easy to learn and sounds not bad. But sometimes it's not specific enough.

Fench: Someone here said it sounds "gay". Often heard that in Germany, too. I'm not very interested in French but I don't dislike it. I think it's not easy to learn. Sometimes I try to read foreign languages. When I compare the romanic languages I have by far the most problems by pronouncing the words of French language.

Spanish: To me Spanish sound nice. I learned a little bit (I learned to sing the first Pokemon intro in Spanish when I was younger lol). It's not that hard to pronounce and easy to learn the pronounciation of for example "ll" and "j" (it's like one of the two sounds of the German "ch").

Italian: Very easy to pronounce and to emphasize. About the grammar I know nothing. I don't like the language very much.

Dutch: It's pretty much like High German (specially Low Saxon dialect and Frisian), but also it's very different. I don't like hearing Dutch. Many people here like listening to it because it sounds funny to them and makes them laugh. I don't think it's funny, it's just not nice to hear.

Slavic languages: I put them all together because I have 1 opinion for all of them. They don't sound nice to me, rather kind of "cold".

Scandinavian languages: Primarily Swedish is similar to German. When I read it I understand many words and even if I listen to it I understand a bit. Norwegian is less similar and Danish the most difficult scandinavian language to me. Listening to scandinavian languages is just like hearing another type of German to me (not in a dialect way).

Greek: Sounds kind of confusing. I rarely listened to it.

Portuguese: My ex girlfriend is Brazilian so I primarily know Brazilian Portuguese and it never sounded bad to my ears.

Japanese: Sounds cool.

Latin: Sounds cool.

Notice: These are just my own opinions!

dony
18-08-13, 05:22
I suppose that it depends of your knowledge about the material culture and proficiency in a specific language, in which I denoted the following aspects :

Español (Spanish) : A beautiful sounding language with so many different accents, is complicated to find resemblance between Standard Castillian and Lunfardo; additionally there are some versions like "El cantito" or Chilean Spanish , which sounds more musical than any variety of Italian; and it sounds interesting in the speech of a philosopher like Roberto Barbery, in the songs of Alex Ubago or in Borge's prose.

Français (French) : Another beautiful language but more focused in abstract thinking and intellectual matters , is not only Derrida or Sartre is Cohn-Bendit and Jaques Delors too, by the way is a pleasure to listen the melodic voices of Lola Dargenti , Mylene Farmer or Hélène Rollès in a song.

Italiano (Italian) : Well they transformed our mother tongue here in Argentina, with a melodic intonation, closer to French in vocabulary but to Spanish in pronunciation; is not surprising than Laura Pausini, Andrea Bocelli or Al Bano Carrisi sounds very well, singing in it.

Русский (Russian) : Well I am lucky that learning it helped me to be in touch with the most beautiful girls in the world :), but of course reading the original versions of the masterpieces of Лев Николаевич Толстой (Leo Tolstoy) or Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вски (Dostoyevsky) has been a great reward, without forgetting the songs of Юля Савичева or Варвара.

English : the contemporary lingua franca is utterly useful nowadays, but I cannot add anything more, just to say than for many romance speakers with a null knowledge of it , can be sometimes confused with German; In the same way that some people confuse Spoken Italian with Spanish.

Another languages in which I am not fluent, but in my humble opinion I considere them pretty sounding are : Português (Portuguese) , română (Romanian) and украї́нська (Ukrainian), but à chacun son goût .

K_Sacana_Blomqvist
18-08-13, 23:13
It is a very complex questions but if I focus on the phonetics and sentence intonation (in general, how a language sounds) here it goes:

I like most the Brazilian Portuguese and the standard Swedish as it is spoken in central Sweden.

Next I would probably put the levelled out general American. Then I could place a number of other languages like Italian, Russian and putong hua - which means Mandarin.

I definitely don´t like the sound of Arabic, Hebrew, Somali, Danish, Kurdish and Farsi.

K_Sacana_Blomqvist
18-08-13, 23:36
What is a very interesting, that "sound" of the language varies according to your native language or the place you have been living or lived. Also, "judging" the language is based on a very subjective grounds.

For example, some people do not like several sounds (or language itself) which are strange - in Portuguese, Dutch, Finnish, or some other languages. On the contrary, they tend to like theirs own languages. This is natural. But, try to explain to the native Dutch person that his language is not nice!

Well I am a living proof that you may be critical of your own langauge :) My mother tongue is Polish but I don´t like the sound of it. On the other hand I have the fairness to admit that another slavic Language Russian has a very nice, soft sound. And bear in mind that I don´t like Lenin, Putin and communism !:)


It´s amazing how you mix up very different and unrelated languages! Anyway, I am wondering what´s strange in Finnish phonetics? A language that really have very clear sounds.


Indeed the Dutch r sound is special. I in person dont like it.


Japanese versus Chinese - definitely I think Japanese is simplier and easier. Chinese is simple only to the extent of the beginner (Wo yao ni 我要伱). And those terrible chinese sounds - saying four tones for ma... with different meanings. But, taking into account such a vast chinese culture, reading the old manuscripts gives the reader the completely new dimension, great dimension as well:)

Well, would you say to a Chinese girl/boy - I want you ... ? :)

I in person would put Mandarin on a high level because for me an Indo-european speaker this language is an a absolut challenge with everything: tones, characters and a structure of isolating language type - in short an anty-thesis of indoe-eurpean language structure.

If you can read Mandarin already - my respect

Sigehild
23-08-13, 06:29
English - Mother tongue. It is hard to judge how it sounds since I cannot be objective! I'll leave that to the non-English speakers.

Likes - none besides I can speak it and understand it and many foreign speakers helps with travelling and communicating!

Dislikes - Feel it has completely lost its soul. Some folk here seem to think its massive vocabulary is a great thing to be proud of but in reality wholesale raiding words from French, Latin and Greek while leaving thousands of native Anglo-Saxon/Old English words to die is cultural suicide (selfquell in Anglish. Why not!) That is my massive shortcoming with English: it should have been prouder of its Germannic/Anglo-Saxon roots and words and kept many more of them alive and used them. We had Old English words for most modern Anglo-Latin-French words, e.g. (including updated spelling for some lost old english words) Sye/Sie = Victory, Rime = count/number, rine = touch, leod = people, Fierd/Hera = Army, Hue/Blee = Colour, Earm = Poor, Akithe = Declare, Kin/Kindred = Family, Missenly/Sundrily = Different, Ellen = Courage, Angetful = Intelligence, Oathbreach = Perjury.... and thousand more examples. Check out the Anglish movement to see about increasing English word stock and old english revival.

Spanish - learning due to Spanish girlfriend and now living in Spain.

Likes - like how the pronunciation is standardised from written Spanish (none of the crazy mess of English!) - of course accents and dialects do exist - such as my girlfriends Andalucian accent - but generally find it easier than understanding some English accents!
Grammer is not so tricky once learned and I find the gender system and verb conjugation extremely flexible. Take 'Tios' one word whereas I would have to say my Uncle and Aunty in English; Amigas = female friends, etc.

Like the Augmentative and diminutive in the language (something English doesn't seem to have). It helps to make lots of new and interesting words with differing senses - ventana (window), ventanilla (car window, box-office window) - is all I can remember now but many more. I think you can apply it to most nouns (a native Spanish speaker will have to enlighten further).

Sound - it is nice, as are most Romance languages, maybe not as expressive as French and Italian, but it still has flow and charm.

French - first learned at school but later mostly forgotten

likes - Sounds nice. Grammar is not too tricky after getting your head around conjugations gender system.

dislikes - the pronunciation can cause problems when listening to French as many conjugations sound similar. 'Singy' uplifting sound of the language can get a bit annoying after a while, like a permanent question tone, but it generally sounds nice.

Italian never learned it but like to try after learning Spanish.

looks similar grammar and vocabulary to Spanish (so easier to learn after Spanish!). Good latin words. Sounds generally nice with the 'singy expressive nature' but again it can get annoying after a while. Especially after sharing a coach trip full of noisy Italian students, it eventually sounds like everyone is saluting each other! But I guess a languages sound annoying after hearing a coach full a noisy youths!

German - Limited knowledge but respect it purity of vocabulary especially in the face of Latin/Greek pressure, even in the fields of science/engineering/technology. Sounds strong and powerful yet sometimes elegant.

Sigehild
05-09-13, 19:01
"Maciamo

English

"I find quite primitive and unscientific to have words ending in "-fish" for sea/water creatures that are not fish, like shellfish, crayfish, jellyfih, etc. I also dislike words like 'pineapple' or 'eggplant', because a pineapple is not related to an apple, and 'eggplant' sounds too weird (it's just a word vaguely based on the appearance of an "egg"). Fortunately the latter is only American English."




So you expected the anglo-saxons to be scientists and zoologists?! I much prefer the usage of -apple and -fish as good pure English roots instead of, yet again, raiding into Latin and Greek dictionaries.

In fact, apple in Old English meant more generally fruit, not just an apple. OE also had earthapple (and others) for cucumber - much better in my opinion - etymologically transparent and using English to its full potential. This constant flooding of English with Latin and Greek does it no favours and weakens our sense of speaking a true English tongue. Same with -fish, do you know the full etymology of the word fish? It might have been a general term for sea-creature in OE times? All we would be doing if we 'borrowed' yet another 'scientific' Latin or Greek word is to hide its true meaning from the general English speaker - basically, another academic snob word.

dony
22-09-13, 17:40
J’aimerai effacer ce message, s'il vous plaît

dony
22-09-13, 17:56
Maciamo
Ma Cherie, I don't think anymore that Spanish is such a beautiful language (after learning it). Real Spanish (from Castilla) is too harsh with all those "j" sounds and snake-like "c" and "z" (like in Zaragoza). It is "drier" and lacks the joyful intonation of Italian. It doesn't have the elegance of French, nor the grandeur of English.

Well it has changed a lot, with is sometimes amusing is how people describe how beautiful is a "standard version " of a language but don’t usually compare it with its daily spoken version, and sadly you like most part of Europeans do not have a clue how Español got so many different accents and how sound them , thankfully in most Spanish speaking countries in the Americas ,almost all the television programmes or the most popular music on radio are en Español, and we can deduce just for hearing it for a couple of minutes from which nationality is someone or what is more is really interesting when there is a discussion between a Italian, South-American and Brazilian about football on the telly using their mother tongue, and there isn’t any subtitles .

NB.- If a non native speaker don't reduce his accent in the process of learning spanish, he will never sound like a native one, and I can assure you que cada hispanoparlante lo sabe.

Johnny Matos
22-06-14, 09:12
I'll start with spanish, my native language:

What I love:

-The way vowels are pronounced: Five vovels, five sounds, and that's it. Unlike english and french for example, vowels will always keep their own sound even if they are followed by another vowel. I like to think that this facilitates the listening process for spanish students.

-If you see it, you pronounce it: For some reason there's no need to mute any consonant nor vowel, except for the letter H which is mute because it lost its sound somehow.

-Accentuation: You will never run into the problem where you see get to read a new word and you don't know exactly how it's said. Its grammar structure and the way you have to accentuate words (using the tilde when needed) will let you know exactly how to pronounce the word even if it's completely new to you (while reading it), unlike english, where if you read the word "island" for the first time and no one told you how it is pronounced, you would end up pronouncing the S and probably accentuating the A.

-Native speakers: A lot of people speak this language natively, so there's a lot of countries I could visit (in the American continent) and have no problem communicating with people.

-Similar languages: Knowing spanish will make learning portuguese, italian, french, catalan and galician MUCH easier than if you didn't know any spanish at all. There are more minoritary languages that are very similiar to spanish, but they are not very useful.

What I hate:

-There is no neutral gender for objects, unlike russian for example. Since I was a little kid this seemed just plain stupid to me. Why would a spoon be female and a desk be male instead of neutral?

-Integrated classism: What if I told you that the way you say "you" and 2nd person conjugations vary depending if you want to be formal or not? Formal spanish uses "usted" instead of "tú" (both mean "you"), and the second person conjugation will be exactly like a third person conjugation. Weird and unnecessary isn't it? If a person has a "higher social position" or if they are older than you, they will be offended if you call them "tú".

-Conjugations, when compared to english and some other languages, are not so practical: The way verbs are conjugated is different for every person/number/tense combination (e.g: we eat, they eat, we ate, they ate, I eat, I ate = nosotros comemos, ellos comen, nosotros comimos, ellos comieron, yo como, yo comí). The verb "comer" had 6 different ways to be saidin this example whereas in english there's only eat and ate regardless of the person.

-Mysogenism?: if there's a group of five male engineers, thay are called "ingenieros" (plural masculine word for engineers). If there's a group of five female engineers, they are called "ingenieras" (plurar femenin for engineer). If there are four female engineers in a group and just one male engineer, somehow they are called "ingenieros" and they are all malenow. Not very important but it's weird.

-The ammount of irregular verbs: because I speak this language naturally most of the times I'm not even aware that I am using an irregular verb. They all seem regular to me, but I can imagine most people who try to learn spanish struggle a lot with the ammount of irregular verbs we have.

English

What I love:

-It's spoken all around the world: A lot of people with different languages have this language in common so they can still communicate. It's what esperanto wants to be, says I.

-It's simple and practical: Objects have no gender, verbs rarely vary when being conjugated.

-Sounds nice to my ears: It doesn't sound as rough as russian or german.

What I hate:

-If you ever had to spell the word week at a spelling bee contest, there's a 50% chance you are screwed. Good luck trying not to spell weak.

-Island is pronounced i-land. I will NEVER get over it, I am sorry.

-Why isn't the word "wicked" pronounced wickt?

French

What I love:

-Sounds a little sexy sometimes.

-Has less irregular verbs than spanish.

-Nothing else.

What I hate:

-Sounds like gibberish sometimes.

-The ammount of homophone words is TOO DAMN HIGH: si, scie, scient and scies, are ALL pronounced "see" despite the almost useless consonants that only serve for reading purposes and not for pronunciation, because they think it's cool I guess. More of this nonsensical crap: (Ver, vers, vert, verre) (sang, sans, son, cent, c'en, s'en) (mai, mais, maie, mes, m'es, m'est, met, mets) (voie, voient, voies, vois, voit, voix) (ai, aie, aient, aies, ait, es, est) (eau, au, aux, haut). All of the words between parentesis sound the same, only context can save you.

-The ridiculous ammount of letters you need to put together just to make a somple sound in some words: eaux is pronounced as "oh" ; oisseau is pronounced as "wasó" ; scient is pronounced as "see"

-Learning how to listen to french can be pretty hard because of the previous phenomena: When listening to this language you can hear a couple vowels and two consonants in a sentence, but when you read that sentence you can find out that you were missing 50 mute consonants and about 150 vowels mixed together that made just one sound. Forgive me forbeing exagerated and "funny" about this matter, but french is just beyond me.

Alcuin
22-11-18, 17:03
I think French has a good orthography, which lends itself well to the written word and makes French texts, newspapers, etc very aesthetic. I also think it is utterly hideous to listen to, perhaps second only to Chinese on a list of the foulest sounds that can be heard coming from the mouths of men. How it ever came to be considered 'beautiful' is beyond me. What I most enjoy isn't the language itself, but the impotent rage of Francophones who detest English with a passion. I'm not sure why they dislike it so much, though I do love hearing it described as 'impure' and a 'creole' (as opposed to a provincial, peasants' dialect of Vulgar Latin with Germanic grammar and a vocabulary of which one-in-five words is derived from Old Frankish, German and English). Perhaps it's just an extension of the rampant Anglophobia in France, which seems to be popular even amongst the 'educated elite'?

Spanish is a language I find very pleasant, Italian less so but still quite nice. German is incredibly underrated (some of those compound words excepted, of course), Dutch is like its weird cousin, and Icelandic is one of my favourites. Celtic languages are a mixed bunch, but I prefer the sound and spelling of Goidelic tongues to Brythonic ones.

Foxy
15-02-19, 21:09
(British) English
Like - my native language. I like the fact that different regions give rise to different words with the same meaning & even different ways to pronounce the same word.

Dislike - the concept that English is one standard language. It isn't. British English is not American English. British English is not simply RP English, there are dozens of regional dialects (just as how Spanish, Italian, etc. has regional dialects) that are not "chav" otherwise professionals, wealthy & well-educated wouldn't have them. How, as example & no offense to anyone, would an Italian like it if they were told their Venetian dialect was solely the dialect of the undesirably uneducated & poor. It's the exact same as saying a regional dialect of British English is "chav".


Japanese
Like - I like a lot about the Japanese language. I'd sort of have to as I grew up there; same reason why I greatly enjoy the people & culture. The language is, in a way, far more complex than school Japanese (standard Tokyo dialect) taught to foreigners and that's probably what stumbles some foreigners beyond rudimentary conversational.

Dislikes - grew up in a multi-lingual family & spoke Japanese from an early age so the dislikes are limited.



For example Japanese (and most East Asian) songs generally suck, but they don't get on my nerves in the same way.

I find this interesting. I've lived in Japan on & off for 20 years with relatives having lived in China for 40+. In many ways I find East Asian music can be superior to European. Lovers by Shigeru Umebayashi or Bei Qing mian Ju as very easy examples. If you are speaking of pop East Asian music, almost allpop music the world over sucks that's why it's typically sung by pretty boys/girls as they're what sells not the songs.

Angela
15-02-19, 21:28
^^No offense, but actually, in Italy, the more educated you are the more standard Italian you use and the less your regional "language" or "dialect". The Veneto might be the only semi-exception, although even there it holds true to a great extent.

There "has" been a move to bring back the "dialects" a bit. In my area the schools teach it a few hours a week, and they changed the road signs to include two versions of the place names, but I think it's doomed.

Foxy
16-02-19, 15:34
^^No offense, but actually, in Italy, the more educated you are the more standard Italian you use and the less your regional "language" or "dialect". The Veneto might be the only semi-exception, although even there it holds true to a great extent.

There "has" been a move to bring back the "dialects" a bit. In my area the schools teach it a few hours a week, and they changed the road signs to include two versions of the place names, but I think it's doomed.

That's more a city problem. But then, no offense, cities in a way have a habit of loosing their traditions, culture, even their uniqueness/individuality, etc. faster & easier than people from towns & villages. Be it due to immigration, foreign trade, etc. or as here governments / city society saying you're "not cool" if you speak like a "village bumpkin". Language standardization, after all, is quite simply a government ploy for it's far cheaper to write in one standard version than maintaining different dialects.


And just because one speaks with a regional dialect doesn't mean they're uneducated or poor.

Personal experience as some (multi millionaire) Italians I know well speak with regional dialects. Some well educated/rich landowning families in the UK speak with regional dialects (friend's uncle is an engineering grad from Oxford, from a own-multiple-country-homes-with-acreage rich family, and he sounds like any other Liverpudlian "chav"). While a German family friend speaks Low German when at home & he got his PhD when 33.

Americas are an even easier example universal, in a way, to the country. It's possible to tell where people are from by their regional dialect as different areas have different words for the same thing (e.g. mountain lions are generally called cougars in one area & pumas in another area).

gidai
16-02-19, 21:50
off-topic,
You also have robotic posts here ?
Look at that profiles:
software-developer (https://www.eupedia.com/forum/members/73345-software-developer)
RenataOstrozzz (https://www.eupedia.com/forum/members/72579-RenataOstrozzz)

Angela
16-02-19, 22:08
Yes, we get robots and sometimes morons. It's harder to get rid of the latter.

gidai
17-02-19, 14:37
Renoant (https://www.eupedia.com/forum/members/75719-Renoant)
(https://www.eupedia.com/forum/members/73345-software-developer)jowel (https://www.eupedia.com/forum/members/75631-jowel)
(https://www.eupedia.com/forum/members/75631-jowel)JamesWorsham
(https://www.eupedia.com/forum/members/64922-JamesWorsham)software-developer (https://www.eupedia.com/forum/members/73345-software-developer)
RenataOstrozzz
... :83:
(https://www.eupedia.com/forum/members/72579-RenataOstrozzz)Please check all posts from new "profiles" like those above! There are many such false profiles made especially day by day to pollute the topics in the forum.
Thank you!

StevenEvans
25-02-19, 18:34
I like to learning language by classic literature like https://freebooksummary.com/the-analysis-of-macbeth-character-development-20683