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ricecake
01-10-06, 08:26
I enjoy watching European cinemas,a window to various local cultures on the continent for me.I have membership with Hollywood Video chain here in the US,it has a section for European films.

What are some latest box-office hits in Europe ( excluding Hollywood productions ) you've seen ?

Maciamo
01-10-06, 11:57
Here are a few recent movies relating to European history, but which are international productions (partly American and partly European, as is often the case). I loved all of them :

Casanova (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0402894/) (2005)
The New World (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0402399/) (2005)
Pride & Prejudice (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0414387/) (2006)
Marie-Antionette (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0422720/) (2006)

misa.j
02-10-06, 00:29
I just watched a Belgian horror called "Calvaire:The Ordeal" (http://www.apple.com/trailers/independent/calvaire/), which was quite disturbing and very weird. A good cinematography filmed in the backcountry of Belgium; unfortunately, it didn't have scenes from the cities, though.
"Very Long Engagement", "Kontroll" are other good movies from Europe that I liked a lot.
I reccomend everyone to watch "The Water" although it's an Indian film.

Ma Cherie
02-10-06, 06:36
I enjoyed Pride and Prejudice as well.:cool:

I would recommend a film called Babett's Feast.

Minty
02-10-06, 22:48
Here are a few recent movies relating to European history, but which are international productions (partly American and partly European, as is often the case). I loved all of them :
Casanova (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0402894/) (2005)
The New World (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0402399/) (2005)
Pride & Prejudice (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0414387/) (2006)
Marie-Antionette (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0422720/) (2006)

Maciamo is always very knowledgeable about the information I like to know about Europe!:cool:

The Phantom of the Opera (2004) is another one, I love the costumes...I think it is a combine production between the Americans and the Europeans...:love:

Ma Cherie
02-10-06, 23:54
*sigh*

Which I enjoyed The Phantom of the Opera as much as you did, Minty. Personally I didn't like the movie. The costumes were nice, but it seemed to be more of a fashion show type thing. :sorry:

Minty
03-10-06, 00:37
*sigh*
Which I enjoyed The Phantom of the Opera as much as you did, Minty. Personally I didn't like the movie. The costumes were nice, but it seemed to be more of a fashion show type thing. :sorry:

Hi there Ma cherie...I like all sorts of films, sometimes I like the historical films , sometimes the very dramatic kinds of films or sometimes when they have very clever story lines like the Alien series. However as I am a girl who likes to dress up from time to time I really enjoy watching a simple movie with beautiful, flamboyant costumes.

Duo
03-10-06, 03:49
Casanova is a very good movie. For other european movies you might want to try out :

Jalla Jalla - swedish comedy

I laureati, Il ciclone, and Il Mostro - Italian films

25 Degres en Hiver - French Movie shot in Brussels

Babam ve oglum - Turkish movie

Passionada - Romance movie set in Portugal

La Dolce Vita - an all time classic

Il marchese del grillo - very funny historical movie set at the time of napoleon

ricecake
03-10-06, 17:05
Thanks for everyone's input,I would like to keep this thread stay open.I've jotted down the film titles,will check out availability at local video place.

There is one good European-storyline romance film titled " Dangerous Beauty " from late 1990's with Jacquline Bissette,it was about an Italian courtesan's romantic twists on the backdrop of Black Plaque ravaging Europe continent of that time.This was a Hollywood production funded by European $ with European cast.




Off-topic :

Here in America,we only get UK's BBC TV dramas on public broadcast station ( PBS ).The Tenant at Wildfell Hall was the best scripted and acted BBC program I've ever seen,it was based on a novel written by Anne Bronte of the Bronte sisters.

Maciamo
03-10-06, 18:01
If we extend a bit the range of "recent" movies to, say, the last 5 years, here are a few more good historical films with European connections (almost all international blockbusters, but...) :

- Kingdom of Heaven (http://imdb.com/title/tt0320661/) (2005)

- Alexander (http://imdb.com/title/tt0346491/) (2004)

- Troy (http://imdb.com/title/tt0332452/) (2004)

- Arsene Lupin (http://imdb.com/title/tt0373690/) (2004)

- The Phantom of the Opera (http://imdb.com/title/tt0293508/) (2004)

- Napoleon (http://imdb.com/title/tt0253839/) (TV, 2002)

- Moulin Rouge (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0203009/) (2001)

Mycernius
03-10-06, 19:28
The most recent one I have seen was called The Brotherhood of the Wolf (Le Pacte des Loups) and France/Canada production. It uses the story of the beast of Gévaudan, an actual event, as the prime plot of the story.

ricecake
04-10-06, 00:05
My avatar just gives me a film title," The Girl with a Pearl Ring " starred Scarlett Johannson and Colin Ferth.The movie is little slow pace but a fine short story retold the life of great Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer.

Minty
09-10-06, 23:36
I thought the title is "Girl with a Pearl Earring (2003)" French title "La Jeune fille à la perle" ( the young girl with the pearl). Yes I saw this movie in 2004 on Canal plus (a paid French digital channel), it was nice. Thanks for sharing Ricecake!

ricecake
09-10-06, 23:57
Thanks for the spelling correction,how could I've mis-typed ring for " earring ".:D

Ma Cherie
10-10-06, 00:55
"Girl with The Pearl Earring" was a good movie. Though, I'm betting the novel was better.:p

Alma
01-12-06, 19:22
What are some latest box-office hits in Europe ( excluding Hollywood productions ) you've seen ?

i am big fan of European movies, especially Spanish.. last thing I saw was ''volver'' by Pedro Almodovar, but that was few months ago... excellent movie, i have to say!

Alma
01-12-06, 19:38
Top Ten Movies from Europe

From stories of grace and beauty to those depicting the horrors and heartbreak of war and death, here's one critic's list of European movies worth watching.

by Agnieszka Tennant | posted 08/24/04

I cannot speak in generalities about movies from Europe. This diverse continent falls victim to enough stereotypes already. For example, we may think that the former Soviet Union chased out God from its territory and its art, or that French movies are risqué and shallow. Swedes are cold; Polaks are dumb; Serbs are ruthless.

But for every generalization about Europe and Europeans, there's a movie that defies it. The directors of the films listed below do it masterfully, giving us remarkable lessons in complex sensibilities of the continent from which many of our ancestors—and some of us—came.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/images/andreirublev-poster.jpg

Andrei Rublev
(Soviet Union, 1969)
Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky

A critically acclaimed epic that sheds light on what it means to be a Christian and an artist, Andrei Tarkovsky's movie is based on the life of a medieval icon painter. Andrei Rublev traces its protagonist through a famine, a Tatar incursion, a "painter's block," a faith crisis, and finally his artistic restoration and a kind of redemption. The film itself is a visual magnum opus that celebrates beauty and art with such breathtaking intensity that one wonders if one could endure this movie had it not been in black-and-white.

Content: Depictions of nudity and sensuality. For mature audiences only.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/images/babettesfeast-poster.jpg

Babette's Feast
(Denmark, 1987)
Directed by Gabriel Axel

In Babette's Feast, director Gabriel Axel serves up the most delicious cinematic portrayal of grace. The setting of the film—in the house of two old maidens who follow in the footsteps of their deceased father in leading an austere religious sect in a lackluster fishing village on Denmark's Jutland peninsula—makes the lavishness of a feast prepared by a French cook even more surprising. The fact that only one person really appreciated the extravagant meal gives us a speculative insight into the mind of God, whose thoughtful gifts to us too often go underappreciated.
Unlike other food-centered movies (Like Water for Chocolate, Chocolat, Tortilla Soup), this one restrains its depictions of food, music, sensuality, beauty, and grace. Its humor and observations, too, are gentle and understated. That, too—like the self-control in enjoying a gourmet meal—is the secret of its power.

Content: No objectionable material, but its slow pace and dialogue may bore younger viewers.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/images/beforetherain-poster.jpg

Before the Rain
(Macedonia, 1994)
Directed by Milcho Manchevski

This tense three-part drama showcases the way wartime derails people's lives.
The first section takes place in a Macedonian monastery where a young monk, who has taken a two-year vow of silence, is hiding an Albanian girl toward whom he's developing affection. The second segment introduces us to a photo editor in London who has an affair with a Macedonian war photographer. In the third part, the photographer returns to his home village in Macedonia (one we know from the first segment) and looks up a woman he once liked. The three stories are intriguingly and artfully interconnected as their characters mingle in the context of violence between Christian Macedonians and Albanian Muslims.

Content: Portrayals of nudity and violence make it suitable for mature viewers only.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/images/decalogue-poster.jpg

Decalogue
(Poland, 1987)
Directed by Krzysztof Kieslowski

The late great Polish director's Decalogue stands for not one but ten enchanting films loosely corresponding to the Ten Commandments. Catholic but rarely churchgoing Krzysztof Kieslowski (also known for The Three Colors: Blue, White, Red) once said that the individual commandments influence each movie "to the same degree that the commandments influence our daily lives." Consequently, some of the films relate to a given commandment almost incidentally, using it instead as an excuse for more complex, ethical debates. And all of the films speak from the particular landscape of Poland under communism to the universal questions we all have.
In Part 1 ("You shall not have other gods besides me"), a university professor introduces his son to a world in which everything can be calculated. But after his son goes ice skating—following the father's estimate that the ice cover on the lake is thick enough to be safe—the world of professor's self-reliance comes crumbling down. Maybe he needs something that cannot be measured: faith. Parts 2 and 8 speak against taking a child's life, Parts 3, 6 and 9 deal with romantic love, which ultimately is "in the heart, not between the legs," in the words of a Part 9 protagonist.

Content: Some parts are unsuitable for children (Part 6 especially, for sexuality); parents should watch them first before allowing their teenagers to see them. On the other hand, some of the films (particularly Parts 1, 2 and 8) are good fodder for Sunday school discussion:
(For more on Decalogue, see my full review in Christianity Today magazine.)

http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/images/jeandeflorette-poster.jpg

Jean de Florette and Manon of the Spring
(France, 1986)
Directed by Claude Berri

The 1986 French film and its sequel is an enthrallingly told tale of corruption and the way it tends to eventually turn on its plotters. Based on two novels by French writer Marcel Pagnol, Jean de Florette and its worthy sequel Manon of the Spring have been compared to Greek and Shakespearean tragedies.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/images/manonofthespring-poster.jpgAs do all tragedies, this one begins with a legitimate desire: in this case, one for water—the water whose source is hidden on the property inherited by a hunchback (played robustly by Gerard Depardieu) who settles on the farm near Marseilles. Greed leads his neighbors to secretly plug his stream and, eventually, to destroy him—something that his beautiful daughter, Manon, will not forget when she grows up, as we learn in the second movie.

Content: Both films are rated PG. Jean de Florette contains one scene of nudity; Manon's violence may be unsuitable for young children.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/images/manwithoutapast-poster.jpg

The Man Without a Past
(Finland, 2002)
Directed by Aki Kaurismaki

Dry, understated humor, bursts of human warmth, and superb sound track in The Man Without a Past are bound to make anyone feel good after watching this movie.
The title character gets mugged and is left for dead when he gets off the train in Helsinki. When he wakes up in a hospital, he doesn't remember who he is. As with other "amnesia movies," the protagonist gets a chance to start from scratch. This one begins his new life in a cargo container, like other homeless people. A Salvation Army employee who helps him put his life together looks past his current social status and into his heart.
Content: Rated PG-13 for graphic violence and profanity.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/images/mylifeasadog-poster.jpg

My Life as a Dog
(Sweden, 1985)
Directed by Lasse Hallström

My Life as a Dog is a sensitive look at a curious boy with a lot on his mind. Besides puberty, 12-year-old Ingemar Johansson has to deal with his mother's dying of tuberculosis, his father's abandonment, a displacement that separates him from his brother, and the death of his dog.
Like the French Ponette on this list (see below), this movie doesn't patronize its young protagonist and other children, respecting their understanding of the confusing adult world. Ingemar's questions mirror to us the consequences of our adult decisions. For example, he wonders, what was so great about sending Laika into space so it can be the first dog there? The dog's subsequent death from starvation? This and other bittersweet insights make the 1987 Swedish release worth our time to reflect on the Ingemar in the youngsters around us—and the Ingemar who resides inside each of us.

Content: Rated PG-13, the film contains scenes of teen sex play and profanities.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/images/nomansland-poster.jpg

No Man's Land
(Bosnia, 2001)
Directed by Danis Tanovic

Set during the Bosnian war in the beginning of the 1990s, this film is a humanizing look at those who fight war literally in the trenches, and at the stuck-in-the-middle UN observers.
In a trench on "no man's land"—neither Serbian nor Bosnian territory—a Serbian soldier and a Bosnian one have a smoke together and realize that they have dated the same woman. You sense that in another time, another place, they could be friends. But not now; now they have to wait for relief from either Bosnian or Serbian soldiers.
Tension intensifies when a so-far unconscious Bosnian soldier wakes up to a nightmarish reality: he mustn't budge because he's lying on a landmine that will explode if he moves. His predicament becomes symbolic of the military conflict. After the men signal for help to their units and to the UN troops, a UN sergeant disobeys an order and arrives at the trench in a tank, hoping he can actually do something to help. The situation becomes more complex when a TV reporter also wants to help and becomes part of the story.

Content: Rated R for violence and language.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/images/ponette-poster.jpg

Ponette
(France, 1996)
Directed by Jacques Doillon

The 4-year-old Victoire Thivisol, who for this role received the Best Actress award at the Venice Film Festival, convincingly renders this profound study of a child's mourning of her mother's sudden death. The stages of her honest grief aren't that far removed from an adult's: First, she waits for her mom to come back. She's angry when that doesn't happen. She consults her friends as she attempts to figure out what God had to do with her mother's disappearance. The children's interpretations of adult matters are sometimes hilarious and sometimes poignant, likely to influence the way adult viewers of this movie will talk to children.

Content: Because of the gravity of the film's subject, children shouldn't watch it unaccompanied by adults. It might help a child process a death of a loved one, but it must be followed by conversation.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/images/wingsofdesire-poster.jpg

Wings of Desire
(Germany, 1987)
Directed by Wim Wenders

Showing us the world through the eyes of angels, great German director Wim Wenders expands our spiritual imagination, strengthens our empathy, and infuses us with hope about the world we live in. He introduces us to two angels, one of whom is not satisfied with his assigned role as a chronicler of God's grace and a mere observer of human thoughts, dreams, hopes, and fears. The ordinary pleasures—be it free will or tasting good coffee—that come with being human appeal to him more and more. After he falls in love with a beautiful trapeze artist and gets a talk from Peter Falk, cast as himself, on being human, he decides to get rid of his wings.

Content: Rated PG-13, the movie contains brief nudity. Suitable for mature young teens and older.

Copyright © 2004 Christianity Today. Click for reprint information.


http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/top10moviesfromeurope.html

this is where google lead me. interesting review, i have to say. unfortunately, i saw only one from this list. for now.

misa.j
03-12-06, 23:25
I've seen three of them on the list.

Berore the Rain, Decalogue, and No Mans Land; all of them were really good, but I especially liked Decalogue. Krzysztof Kieslowski is one of the best directors who captures human emotions in incredible ways.

Duo
05-12-06, 06:53
I've seen before the rain and no man's land. Both very good movies.

Solstice
16-12-06, 02:32
I've seen three of them on the list.
Berore the Rain, Decalogue, and No Mans Land; all of them were really good, but I especially liked Decalogue. Krzysztof Kieslowski is one of the best directors who captures human emotions in incredible ways.

I agree completely!

A few films off the top of my head.

UK: Dirty Pretty Things
Polish: Dekalog, Blind Chance...all of Kieslowski's works.
France: La double vie de VeLronique, Trois Couleurs Trilogy, AmeLlie (of course), Delicatessen, Un long dimanche de fiancailles.
Germany: Lola Rennt (Run Lola Run), Good Bye! Lenin, Gegen Die Wand (Absolutely brilliant view on Turkish culture in Germany - and a beautiful film)
Italy: Stanza del figlio, La vita e` bella
Sweden: Tillsammans (Together), Lilja 4-ever, F.ucking Amal, and anything by Bergman.
Denmark: Reconstruction
Iceland: Noi albinoi, 101 reykjavik
Spanish: Open your eyes, Talk to her, Bad Education

TheCaptain
25-05-09, 22:39
Three movies I enjoyed very much:


The Celebration (Festen) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0154420/)
Denmark, 1998

One of my favourite Danish films, and it won quite a few awards. It tells the story of a family gathering to celebrate their father's 60th birthday. At the dinner the son reveals a rather unpleasant secret about his father. The Dogme 95 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogme_95) style makes it interesting too.


The Lives of Others (Das Leben der Anderen) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0405094/)
Germany, 2006

Doesn't need any introduction. It's a must-see film!


The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Män som hatar kvinnor) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1132620/)
Sweden/Denmark, 2009

Successful film adaptation of Stieg Larsson's very exciting global bestseller novel (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Girl-Dragon-Tattoo-Stieg-Larsson/dp/1847245455/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1243280667&sr=8-1), which I recommend too. It's brand new, but it has already hit the cinemas in France, Belgium, Italy and Spain, and other countries will undoubtedly follow.

Alma
23-06-09, 14:49
The Lives of Others (Das Leben der Anderen) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0405094/)
Germany, 2006
Doesn't need any introduction. It's a must-see film!


couldn't agree more! :good_job: amazing one!

also, more recent movie from germany, "die welle" (wall)... saw it coulpe of months ago... worth watching.

TheCaptain
05-07-09, 01:14
couldn't agree more! :good_job: amazing one!

also, more recent movie from germany, "die welle" (wall)... saw it coulpe of months ago... worth watching.

I haven't seen it, unfortunately. And by the way, "Die Welle" means "the wave".

Actually, a lot of brilliant movies have come out of Germany in recent years. Good Bye Lenin! (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0301357/), Der Untergang (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0363163/), Die Fälscher (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0813547/) (The Counterfeiters)and Der Baader Meinhof Komplex (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0765432/) are all movies I recommend.

Cambrius (The Red)
06-07-09, 05:13
The Celebration was excellent...

^ lynx ^
09-12-09, 20:05
Cinema Paradiso (Italy)
The life of the others (Germany)
Secrets & lies (UK)
Soldados de Salamina (Spain)
Millenium saga (Sweden)

donny
15-12-09, 13:46
European cinematography is not valued to it's real potential. I saw many memorable movies that really have something to teach you. Starting with Portugal cinematography and ending with Russian cinema, you really have some very interesting productions to see. It is really worth researching more into this. Good luck!

Tautalos
02-03-10, 02:22
The Wicker Man (1973) - an awsome British film.

Also, «The Adventures of the Baron of Munchausen», from Terry Gilliam. Yes, Gilliam is an American. But he is the most European of all Americans, as it was said before... and, actually, he recently became an European citizen (British, I tink). He made all the tv series and films of the British Monty Python group; and the above mentioned Baron of Munchausen is an European literary hero. Most of the actors in this film are European (Brits).

Another of his great European films was «The Grimm Brothers», entirely based on the writtings of these mentioned German Nationalist authors.

How many European film makers can be credited with such an amount of genuinely European cinema?

skirane
04-03-10, 08:20
no man's land is awesome !

Mako
26-08-10, 17:59
Andrei Rublev

(Soviet Union, 1969)

Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky


A critically acclaimed epic that sheds light on what it means to be a Christian and an artist, Andrei Tarkovsky's movie is based on the life of a medieval icon painter. Andrei Rublev traces its protagonist through a famine, a Tatar incursion, a "painter's block," a faith crisis, and finally his artistic restoration and a kind of redemption. The film itself is a visual magnum opus that celebrates beauty and art with such breathtaking intensity that one wonders if one could endure this movie had it not been in black-and-white.

russul
01-11-10, 17:22
Goodbye Lenin (German)
really sad but soo cool :)

Carlitos
05-11-10, 02:04
Many years ago in the spanish t.v. emitted cinema from around the world and I really liked the Polish cinema, I do not remember any titles. At present, the Spanish television channels are taken over by U.S. emissions, work from Monday to Saturday and barely have time to watch movies, although I studied screenwriting and interpretation, I even make a film as an actor, recently the time available to devote to other issues.

Mzungu mchagga
05-11-10, 19:49
For me personally "El Orfanato" of Juan Antonio Bayona is one of the best horror movies ever. It really freaked me out.

Carlitos
05-11-10, 23:59
For me personally "El Orfanato" of Juan Antonio Bayona is one of the best horror movies ever. It really freaked me out.


I love horror, when I have some time to see The Orphanage.

europeanlives
10-11-10, 22:23
I must say: "The boy in the striped pyjamas", The millenium saga (although i haven't seen the second movie yet). I really like european movies, they are more concerned about the story than with the special effects.

Riccardo
24-03-11, 19:16
Goodbye Lenin (German)
really sad but soo cool :)

I totally agree, great movie! :smile:

Did anyone see Soul Kitchen?

Riccardo
24-03-11, 19:17
Another movie I really loved, a Spanish one: "Los amantes del Circulo Polar Artico".

Canek
24-03-11, 19:36
i liked the first movie of the millenium saga.

Carlitos
25-03-11, 00:00
Another movie I really loved, a Spanish one: "Los amantes del Circulo Polar Artico".


I also liked the climax is so special, you'll probably like Luca y el sexo, a film is also special.

Riccardo
25-03-11, 00:22
I also liked the climax is so special, you'll probably like Luc�a y el sexo, a film is also special.

Of course! I loved it! Paz Vega became famous with that movie! Creo que Lucìa y el sexo sea una peli fantastica! :good_job:

Gavroche
11-05-11, 10:02
"The name of the rose"...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Name_of_the_Rose_(film)

"The City of Lost Children"...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_City_of_Lost_Children

"Breaking the Waves"...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breaking_the_Waves

"La haine"...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Haine

Great European movies!!!

Anton, Bear's den
18-05-11, 22:39
Recommend movie "Fear and Trembling", about Belgian female which worked in Japanese company and met a lot of troubles.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUdZL7eZdcI

and frivolous comedy "Wickie the Viking"


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Bs0wVlAezU&feature=related

Carlitos
18-05-11, 22:58
Now being issued in a Spanish TV channel Agora Amenábar film, but do not think it is inexcusable that any Spanish producer has made a blockbuster on the Kingdom of Tartessos and first Agora to meet the growing demands of the fem-ism in the West to feminism rather see Pepi, Luci, Bom y otras chicas del montón.

Gavroche
19-05-11, 09:17
Recommend movie "Fear and Trembling", about Belgian female which worked in Japanese company and met a lot of troubles
Oh yes :good_job:

Very good movie and a very good book of Amélie Nothomb...

I want to recommend the movie "The life of Brian", one of the greatest comedy of all the time, and my favourite English movie...:heart:

The story of the neighbor of Jesus, borned the same day and the same hour...did he have the same destiny?

Maciamo
19-05-11, 09:25
Recommend movie "Fear and Trembling", about Belgian female which worked in Japanese company and met a lot of troubles.

I have read the book and found it was absolutely terrible, one of the worst book ever about Japan. Many of the French-speakers I know who have also lived and worked in Japan and read the book agree with me. Amélie Nothomb is depicting a completely false and caricatural view of Japanese companies. I don't know if she did it on purpose as a kind of satirical parody, or because she held some kind of grudge about Japanese companies, but you shouldn't believe anything in that book/film. Amélie Nothomb did grow up in Japan, as the daughter of the Belgian ambassador, but her experience in Japan is mostly limited to her childhood in the secluded circle of expats and embassy staff. Her insight on working in Japan has no credentials.

Gavroche
19-05-11, 09:58
I have read the book and found it was absolutely terrible, one of the worst book ever about Japan. Many of the French-speakers I know who have also lived and worked in Japan and read the book agree with me. Amélie Nothomb is depicting a completely false and caricatural view of Japanese companies. I don't know if she did it on purpose as a kind of satirical parody, or because she held some kind of grudge about Japanese companies, but you shouldn't believe anything in that book/film. Amélie Nothomb did grow up in Japan, as the daughter of the Belgian ambassador, but her experience in Japan is mostly limited to her childhood in the secluded circle of expats and embassy staff. Her insight on working in Japan has no credentialsIt was a caricatur of her personnal experience, that's all...:indifferent:

Maciamo
19-05-11, 10:39
It was a caricatur of her personnal experience, that's all...:indifferent:

You really think that she worked for a Japanese company and ended up cleaning the toilets ? Based on my experience, Westerners working for Japanese companies are treated with more respect than locals (often because they are high-ranking expats or specialists). The only special treatment they are given is not to be obliged to follow some Japanese customs, because the Japanese don't expect them to understand their culture.

Gavroche
19-05-11, 11:52
You really think that she worked for a Japanese company and ended up cleaning the toilets?Please, read her biography...worked in Japan has been a horrible experience for her...

Another European movie?

Nightwatch...a russian fantasy-thriller...

Very good film making with spectacular visual effects, but the end is a little bit disappointed...

Anton, Bear's den
29-05-11, 00:04
Love French comedies:
Les Visiteurs
Les Couloirs du temps : les Visiteurs 2
Fantômas trilogy
Asterix & Obelix Take On Caesar
Asterix & Obelix: Mission Cleopatra
Almost all films with participation of Louis de (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_de_Fun%C3%A8s) Funes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_de_Fun%C3%A8s)
The French know how to make a funny comedy

Brett142
06-06-11, 04:42
Pan's Labyrinth, The Devil's Backbone, The Downfall, The Orphanage, Rec, these are all really good!

Gavroche
09-06-11, 09:51
Les Couloirs du temps : les Visiteurs 2
Fantômas trilogy...:shocked:...

Don't watch it, you will be blind!!!

If you want to watch good comedies:
-La cité de la peur
-Le bonheur est dans le prés
-Tatie Daniel
-Bernie
-Les beaux gosses
-C'est arrivé près de chez vous

I have watched "Good-bye Lenin" yesterday, and yes, this is a great film...:heart:

Cimmerianbloke
18-06-11, 04:13
As for Amelie Nothomb, I will not comment on the movie, I haven't seen it and don't plan to. But I have to say she is one of the best writers of the last 20 years, her style is amazing, her prose and use of the French language have no match as far as I am concerned. Living abroad for the last 12 years, reading the new Nothomb is always a delight, I rediscover my native language through her.

Concerning European movies (or foreign movies as they are called in the UK, even though US blockbusters are also semantically foreign to them...), all the above-mentioned movies are great and deserve being seen. Here are a few of what I would recommend:

Black Book (Paul Verhoeven)
De Helaasheid der Dinge (The Misfortunates)
Torrente (spanish comedy, very rude and insightful)
Soldados de Salamina (about the Spanish civil war)
SM-Rechter (Belgian, real-life story that made the buzz in Belgium)
Dossier K (in Flemish, about the Albanian mafia in Antwerp)
Europa Europa (classic, fantastic war story)
Al Sur de Granada (a favourite of mine)

Anything from Julio Medem and Pedro Almodovar...

Canek
28-06-11, 23:20
torrente is not a comedy is more a bio-pic of spain these days. :innocent:

Carlitos
28-06-11, 23:46
torrente is not a comedy is more a bio-pic of spain these days. :innocent:

I see you are familiar with Spanish cinema, do you realize?

Canek
29-06-11, 20:28
I watch them in internet. Not in the cinemas or by television. Spanish cinema is not liked not famous here in latam.

Gavroche
04-07-11, 15:37
Yesterday i have seen the biography of Canek: TrollHunter :startled:

A Norvegian horror-thriller film, made like a documentary...

A group of students set out to make a documentary about a supposed bear poacher, Hans. The students are following Hans through western norway. When they try to interview him he tells them to go away, but they persist. As they follow him into a forest, they see flashing lights and hear roars from something larger than a bear. Hans comes running back to his vehicle, screaming "T-R-O-L-L!"

Mzungu mchagga
04-07-11, 15:50
Yesterday i have seen the biography of Canek: TrollHunter :startled:

A Norvegian horror-thriller film, made like a documentary...

A group of students set out to make a documentary about a supposed bear poacher, Hans. The students are following Hans through western norway. When they try to interview him he tells them to go away, but they persist. As they follow him into a forest, they see flashing lights and hear roars from something larger than a bear. Hans comes running back to his vehicle, screaming "T-R-O-L-L!"

he he *lol*

Canek
04-07-11, 16:30
hahaha that was funny VonR. :lol:

But there is much more ******** among the spaniards in this forum than from me. ;)

Knovas
08-07-11, 22:11
I don't usually like spanish cinema. However, I recently saw "El Arrebato" (Iván Zulueta) and I liked. Very crazy and serious film but, in my opinion, quite interesting.

Carlitos
08-07-11, 22:33
When they withdraw the subsidies to the Spanish cinema it will be a better cinema, if you do not sell earnings devote to another thing: but not!, come to make movies of the Spanish civil war subsidized, I have already lost the account of the movies on the civil war, we will see if finally this magic subsidized circle breaks and one gives the opportunity to others that are rotting and that probably will never do a movie.

spongetaro
09-07-11, 16:21
I've just seen La Solitudine Dei Numeri Primi . I liked it until the end that I didn't really understand, maybe because I had not yet read the book

Knovas
12-07-11, 09:57
I'm fed up Spanish Civil War films. I agree it's necesary to support other projects, since this is becoming something like an obsesion.

adamski
01-09-11, 09:16
For me Pride and Prejudice and Atonement are two of the best directed and played European movies... and what I truly love about them is their closeness to the literature text. Keira Knightley is so beautiful when playing and I just adore the British accent.

ultralars
01-09-11, 12:04
Der untergang, or downfall is a really good movie that depicts the last days in hitlers bunker.

loladunas
06-09-11, 20:26
I like german films: i have seen downfall, sophie scholl,
love in thoughts, napola, the wave... all are good
Sweden: Ondskan, let me in (i loved this terror film)
Denmarck: In a better world (good film about bullying that i saw recently)
uk: Atonement
.
.
.

Riccardo
24-09-11, 02:03
...:shocked:...

Don't watch it, you will be blind!!!

If you want to watch good comedies:
-La cité de la peur
-Le bonheur est dans le prés
-Tatie Daniel
-Bernie
-Les beaux gosses
-C'est arrivé près de chez vous

I have watched "Good-bye Lenin" yesterday, and yes, this is a great film...:heart:

Totally agree, Good-bye Lenin is one of my favourite movies. Really great, this is European cinema!


I like german films: i have seen downfall, sophie scholl,
love in thoughts, napola, the wave... all are good
Sweden: Ondskan, let me in (i loved this terror film)
Denmarck: In a better world (good film about bullying that i saw recently)
uk: Atonement
.
.
.

They told me that "The Wave" is really well done and interesting. But I can't find it!

Balder
25-09-11, 00:27
Wim Wenders, Wings of Desire.

Riccardo
26-09-11, 18:47
Have someone of you seen "Jalla! Jalla!"?

Cimmerianbloke
27-09-11, 03:26
I saw "La Prima Cosa Bella" a few days back, wonderful movie that had me crying and laughing, definitely an Oscar for best foreign movie contender.

Riccardo
27-09-11, 16:03
I saw "La Prima Cosa Bella" a few days back, wonderful movie that had me crying and laughing, definitely an Oscar for best foreign movie contender.

You're totally right, this is a great movie. Virzì is just unique.

samchn07
16-12-11, 14:15
yes, here are some of the best you are looking for:
Tyrannosaur (2011)
The Baron (2011)
BFI London Film Festival Review: The Monk (2011)
MIFFF Short Films
The Guard (2011)
The Last Circus (2010)

Boranidas
02-01-12, 21:04
One film I watched recently. Try to see the film named "Perfume:The story of a murderer", originally a novel, a well done narrative. German production.

Cimmerianbloke
03-01-12, 00:11
I watched Rundskop a couple of days back, a very powerful movie about the hormones mafia in the cattle breeders in Flanders. Definitely a must see for the main character's acting.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1821593/

Goga
12-01-12, 22:08
"Cave of Forgotten Dreams", a very interesting anthropological documentary about the early Europeans!

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1664894/

Cimmerianbloke
28-01-12, 02:17
I watched Rundskop a couple of days back, a very powerful movie about the hormones mafia in the cattle breeders in Flanders. Definitely a must see for the main character's acting.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1821593/

Officially running for Oscar for best foreign movie...

Riccardo
02-04-12, 15:56
What about "The Believer"?

Cimmerianbloke
27-05-12, 03:51
I had the opportunity to watch a very nice Polish movie as my language course assignment: Sztuczki. I recommend it:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1094278/

sumit_kumar
08-02-13, 11:09
celebration was excellent really....

Balder
25-02-13, 06:53
A Royal Affair (Danish: En kongelig affære). An 18th-century ménage à trois involving the King of Denmark.

willbert
12-03-13, 13:59
I would really recommend this true story: Untouchable (french film, please google it)

Great french film with what you might expect as heavy subject matter but its really funny and its a feel good film throughout. Got a few awards this year and last.

dony
24-08-13, 01:59
Lilya 4-ever (2002) русский
******* Åmål (1998) Svenska
Ladri di biciclette(1948) Italiano
los amantes del circulo polar (1998) Español
La haine (1995) Français
Jungfrukällan (1960) Svenska
L'Age D'Or (1930)
Броненосец Потемкин (1925)
La Vita e Bella (1997) Italiano
Lila dit ça (2005) Français
Les fabuleux destin d'amélie poulain (2001) Français

Balder
24-08-13, 02:11
Solaris, Andrei Tarkovsky
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solaris_(1972_film)

Please, please, watch it guys..

Balder
05-09-13, 01:23
Edukators, from Germany
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Edukators

errantbit
03-10-13, 00:48
The White Ribbon,Michael Haneke.

American Idiot
19-11-13, 11:56
I like the film "Valhalla Rising" and one called "My 5 minutes of Heaven" about Northern Ireland starring Liam Neeson.

Angela
06-02-14, 23:18
I recently saw the Czech film Zelary, set in World War II, and would recommend it. It's a romantic movie in some ways, so it may not be up everybody's alley, but it's pretty gritty as well.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0288330/


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQK6snelUvk

Aberdeen
07-02-14, 05:48
One European movie I liked very much was The Unbearable Lightness of Being, which was made in the 1980s but was about the spiritual journey of a couple who were caught up in the 1968 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia and its aftermath. The ending was quite sad but very powerful.

Angela
10-04-14, 19:06
Some of you might want to give LaProie (The Prey) a try. It's available with English subtitles on Netflix for those in the U.S. or who have access to that company. It's a 2011 French action thriller that got mixed reviews. I certainly agree that it's not high art, but I thought it was enjoyable.

Echetlaeus
10-04-14, 19:37
You cannot miss "The Great Beauty" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2358891/), truly a sublime film.

Angela
12-04-14, 18:41
La Grande Bellezza was discussed in posts 10 and 11 of this thread on Italian cinema.

http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/29630-Italian-Cinema?p=427471&highlight=Great+Beauty#post427471

Echetlaeus
30-04-14, 19:31
The Hunt (2012) (Danish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danish_language): Jagten), a very good film indeed.

Echetlaeus
10-05-14, 05:10
Blancanieves (2012), a Spanish production. Based on the story of "Snow White".
A must see film-noir !

Carlos
10-05-14, 12:17
The film triumphs in Spain
A humorous review the corseted and bitter life of a small region that only looks to his navel.

Title:

8 Basque surnames

Title in reference to the aberrations of the Basque nationalists who set 8 surnames would have someone to be considered pure Basque

6426

Top Basque vasc bride and her father. Down with boyfriend Andalusian woman Extremadura settled in Euskadi.

http://www.cinedor.es/estrenos/8-apellidos-vascos

Rafa (Dani Rovira), Andalusian-blooded, has never had to leave his beloved Sevilla to get what matters most in life: fine, the hair gel and women. Then one day everything changes when the first woman to resist her charms appear: Amaia (Clara Lago), a Basque. Rafa, determined to win, travels to a village deep Euskadi. There, for Amaia will do whatever it takes, to impersonate Basque, with the help of a frontier (Carmen Machi).

Spanish is the humorous film that is winning right now in Spain, I think it takes 2 million euros raised.

It is full of clichés, and becomes a modernized sequel "landismo" the Spanish cinema of the 70s and 80s that has always triumphed in Spain for trying own issues in a humorous way.

Landismo is the name of a certain genre and cinematic phenomenon Spanish , trying to combine the easy comedy with eroticism low intensity .


The phenomenon known in the history of Spanish cinema with the aforementioned name refers to its most representative and outstanding performer , Alfredo Landa. This term encompasses a series of films that starred the actor during a period of his career , running from 1969 until 1978 , and in Spain of censorship were classified as S.


This type of film belongs to the genre of comedy and , more specifically, of the sitcom and entanglement , royal heir of the magazine of the time . A classic example is not covet your neighbor 's fifth successful film directed by Tito Fernandez in 1970.


These films reflected , comedic , problems , concerns and environments of the Spanish society in the last years of Franco and the first call of the Transition to democracy.


Directors Mariano Ozores , Pedro Lazaga , Luis María Delgado and Fernando Merino were prolific at this stage, and actors like José Luis López Vázquez and José Sacristan were present in many of their deals .


In a press conference in 2007, the Spanish Film Festival in Malaga, Alfredo Landa was " very proud " to have created the so-called landismo because " no one who has left something as important as a way of being, acting and view of life " , but in reality the true architects of the phenomenon were the writers of the films involved.

6425
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfredo_Landa

Anton, Bear's den
10-05-14, 14:56
Fantomas, all 3 parts: Fantômas (1964 film)Fantômas se déchaîneFantômas contre Scotland Yard
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fant%C3%B4mas_(1964_film)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fant%C3%B4mas_se_d%C3%A9cha%C3%AEne
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fant%C3%B4mas_contre_Scotland_Yard

Also the movies about idiots from medieval ages:
Les VisiteursThe Visitors II: The Corridors of Time
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Visitors_II:_The_Corridors_of_Time
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Les_Visiteurs

+ Siegfried (2005)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2J1gjntfkA

Echetlaeus
15-05-14, 03:08
As it is in Heaven (2004) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0382330/?ref_=ttmd_md_nm), a Swedish movie.

Very sentimental.

Angela
19-05-14, 15:14
Blancanieves (2012), a Spanish production. Based on the story of "Snow White".


A must see film-noir !

I did try it, but I really don't like watching silent films, I'm afraid, and I found the highly stylized style and cinematography very off-putting and distancing as well.

Your Swedish film recommendation, As It Is in Heaven, was much more up my alley. I guess I'm "very sentimental".:smile:

Echetlaeus
19-05-14, 18:46
I did try it, but I really don't like watching silent films, I'm afraid, and I found the highly stylized style and cinematography very off-putting and distancing as well.

Your Swedish film recommendation, As It Is in Heaven, was much more up my alley. I guess I'm "very sentimental".:smile:

This is what I said in the beginning as well, but eventually I liked it.

Angela
02-06-14, 14:41
"Barbara", a German film that explores life in totalitarian East Germany. It reminded me of The Lives of Others.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_%282012_film%29

Angela
17-06-14, 20:58
This isn't properly speaking a film; it's a television series. I just finished it. The acting, the plot twists, and the suspense made it very enjoyable, and I'm usually not into these grand conspiracy kind of premises.

Salamander:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salamander_%28TV_series%29

Angela
06-09-14, 17:02
I don't know why, but I never got around to seeing the film "Farinelli".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farinelli_%28film%29

I just watched it yesterday. I must say I disagree with some of the English language reviews of it. I very much enjoyed it.

Serena
15-06-16, 08:59
What do you think about Russian "Leviofan"?

Angela
15-06-16, 20:27
What do you think about Russian "Leviofan"?

You mean this, correct?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leviathan_(2014_film)

I want to see it, but I've been hoping it will be made available by Netflix or MHZ, since I already subscribe to those services.

Did you see it? What do you think?

Carlos
16-01-20, 02:44
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdhAMWX0ok4










https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdhAMWX0ok4

I have not been to the cinema for two decades but I will return to see this film, also set in Madrid and based on a true story, I love it.