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MikawaObasan
12-02-07, 07:58
Hello, I am a Canadian citizen with no British ancestry. However, I am seeking to become British. I was made in England but not born there. I wish to be recognized as a British national, and wish to naturalize. How tough is it compared to an American or a Japanese? How much advantage do we have over others? Are we classifed as foreigners or aliens when we go through immigration or do we line up with the British nationals when arriving at Hethrow airport. I plan to find a nice English lady when I go there, and hope to marry and raise a family. I am a full blooded Caucasian, but I have a B.A. in Japanese, and wish to become a Japanese teacher in England. Is it possible?

Maciamo
12-02-07, 13:50
I don't think you have any advantage over anybody else. You certainly have a disadvantage compared to EU citizens, as you do not have automatic permanent residency in the UK. To become a British citizen you must first be living in the UK for 5 years, then apply for naturalisation. I am not sure whether they have already implemented the "Britishness test", but if they haven't they probably will until you've done your 5 years, so you should learn in detail about British legislation, institutions, culture, history, etc. (the proposed test is difficult even for British people).

More info on British nationality law (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_nationality_law).

Mycernius
20-02-07, 18:33
While, as Maciamo says, you are not an EU member, you do have a slight advantage of being Canadian because it is a commonwealth country and it works in favour over someone who is not of a commonwealth country.

MikawaObasan
05-03-07, 23:15
While, as Maciamo says, you are not an EU member, you do have a slight advantage of being Canadian because it is a commonwealth country and it works in favour over someone who is not of a commonwealth country.

How? UK seems to be kissing feet on the Yankee more, being the most powerful country in the world, even though they have betrayed England. With Canada being good loyal subjects always faithful until the very end, we got nothing for it. Canada too got screwed by the USA by kissing its feet. The only advantage is, if a WWIII does happen, Canada will be one country that will not get bombed and Canadians will not be drafted no matter what. Even in the event of a Nuclear War, Canada will be one place as safe as Switzerland.

If they want to give Canada something like what the Japanese give Japanese descendents who are not Japanese nationals like the Nikkeijin Visa, that would be more like respect. Like a Commonwealth Realm Visa for Australians, New Zeland, and Canadians, with the similar advantages as the Nikkeijin Visa.

Maciamo
05-03-07, 23:37
With Canada being good loyal subjects always faithful until the very end, we got nothing for it.

Why should a Canadian be able to become more easily British than a Brit could become Canadian ?

I don't think that Europeans from any country have more advantage in obtaining the Canadian or US citizenship than the reverse, eventhough the US and Canada were colonised by Europeans and are people majoritarily by people of European descent, who migrated with their part of European culture, language, traditions and sciences.

After all the countries built on European immigration were Canada and the USA, so why suddenly change policy ?

Nowadays, when Europeans (and maybe Canadians too) travel to the USA they are treated like terrorist suspects.

MikawaObasan
06-03-07, 00:39
Why should a Canadian be able to become more easily British than a Brit could become Canadian ?

I don't think that Europeans from any country have more advantage in obtaining the Canadian or US citizenship than the reverse, eventhough the US and Canada were colonised by Europeans and are people majoritarily by people of European descent, who migrated with their part of European culture, language, traditions and sciences.

After all the countries built on European immigration were Canada and the USA, so why suddenly change policy ?

Nowadays, when Europeans (and maybe Canadians too) travel to the USA they are treated like terrorist suspects.

Because we have eurpean blood in us. And now that EU joined up, the should be giving us the same as what Japan gives their Nikkeijin a special visa.

If Canadians had a law that if the second country of citizenship went to war with Canada, or the US, they should be made to declare a single nationality, then, we wouldn't have this problem. The Japanese who were interned here have even mentioned that they would have perferred if they simply made them declare a single nationality and those who would choose to be only Canadian should have been left alone. Only those who chose to keep their Japanese nationality under such circumstances due to patriotism or whatever should have been deported, according to one Japanese American.

MikawaObasan
06-03-07, 02:52
Why should a Canadian be able to become more easily British than a Brit could become Canadian ?

I don't think that Europeans from any country have more advantage in obtaining the Canadian or US citizenship than the reverse, eventhough the US and Canada were colonised by Europeans and are people majoritarily by people of European descent, who migrated with their part of European culture, language, traditions and sciences.

After all the countries built on European immigration were Canada and the USA, so why suddenly change policy ?

Nowadays, when Europeans (and maybe Canadians too) travel to the USA they are treated like terrorist suspects.

Canada does roll the red carpet for England. As a British, it is your right to come to Canada. It just doesn't work in the reverse.

MikawaObasan
06-03-07, 03:37
Immigration is one of the greatest cause of concern for a lot of Europeans nowadays. Extreme-right parties are becoming increasingly popular as governments seem unable to control the influx of third world immigrants. The EU, and more specifically the Schengen zone, has also greatly facilitated cross-border movements, but also illegal immigration. EU leaders are already discussing the urgency of having a single Schengen-visa with the same acceptance criteria for all member states, so as to prevent "visa shopping" around EU embassies around the world. But what direc should Europe take more generally for its immigration policy ?

Personally, I am extremely pro-European, and so I am naturally in favour of intra-European migration. Regarding extra-European immigration, I would like to see a policy closer to that of Japan, i.e. allowing people only if a company sponsor them for their working visa, and set a minimum level of education (in Japan it is a 4-year university diploma) for prospective foreign workers. I would freeze completely immigration from third world countries (e.g. all Africa) as well as from the Islamic world.

A lot of the legal immigrants from the third world to Europe nowadays come through the principle of "family reunification". I want to see much stricter rules in this regard. It is alright to come with your spouse and children, but not with your siblings, cousins, parents, grand-parents, uncles, aunts, second-cousins, etc. Only people who are have a job that permit them to support their family (spouse and children) decently would be granted a visa for them. Each family member would have to take the oath to follow the integration course as long as it takes to become fluent in the local language and aware of legal and cultural matters of the host country. If the sponsor of the family (e.g. the father) loses his job, (s)he and his/her family would have to return to their home country if they haven't found a new job with a sufficient income (proved by taxes) within 6 months or 1 year. This is also similar to the way things work in Japan.

As for political refugees and asylum seekers, I would only accept those that take the oath to learn the language and culture of the European region that is welcoming them by following (free) compulsory integration courses. There should be annual checks, and anybody that would not respect this oath would be liable to be send back to their home country, even if it is at war. After all, accepting people as refugees is doing them a favour, it is not a right, and even less an obligation. The least refugees could do to thank their host country is to adapt to their new home.

Permanent residency should only been granted to people with a stable job and sufficient income over the last 5 years, who has in addition proven their language and integrational abilities (with official test results as a proof).

One more important thing, no amnesty for failed asylum seekers and illegal immigrants. This only encourages some unscrupulous mafia to continue their human trafficking between Africa and Europe. It has happened frequently (every 5 or 10 years) in countries like Italy, Spain, France or the Benelux, and this has probably been one of the worst error in immigration policies after WWII.

Maciamo, Canadians and Americans should be excepted in the rule for Extra European rule of yours. We are honorary Europeans. We should be seen in equal stature to that of the UK even. Wanna put that imposition on the Japanese, okay. That is one G-8 country that deserves no special priviledges after denying any foreigners who lack Japanese blood citizenship. At least it is still easier for a third world citizen to become a full British citizen than it is for even an Englishmen to become Japanese nationality. They do it to us, so we can do it to them. And they are Asians, and not Europeans so you owe them nothing. After all, they wouldn't let us become citizens of their country all that easily, so to treat them likewise as they treat us is fair game, and they can stay on their tiny island of theirs and stay put. But Canadians and Americans, we are G-8 Brothers of Europe. You gotta help out the Aussies and the Kiwis too.

I wish that the EU offer is extended to these G8 European Brothers in North America, Australia and New Zealand. Many Canadians would be happy to join.

Brett142
06-06-11, 04:39
Canadians do actually get priority over other immigrants if they can prove British ancestry. I met 2 Canadians once who automatically got a visa in the UK because of this. They proved their ancestry back to an expelled Scottish clan.

zudnic
25-08-16, 17:59
Even if you get a British citizenship, you don't become a British national. On all passports by law they need to list place of birth and nationality. So you get a British passport, it would say nationality and list the Canadian city you where born in. For international travel, in some ways a Canadian passport is just as good, as a British. The British only gets you into three more countries visa free VS the Canadian.

Canadian constitution says:
Whereas the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick have expressed their Desire to be federally united into One Dominion under the Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, with a Constitution similar in Principle to that of the United Kingdom:
And whereas such a Union would conduce to the Welfare of the Provinces and promote the Interests of the British Empire:

Despite the statute of Westminster and the repatriation of the Constitution, Canada is still British! Fact even if you get British citizenship, doesn't give the right to live in the UK! Fact under British law, a Canadian is considered a British Subject in the UK. They know call it commonwealth citizen. As such, you don't need British citizenship to have rights of a citizen in the UK. By law you have the same rights as a Canadian as a British citizen in the UK. You can even vote if you live in the UK as a Canadian.

Aaron1981
26-08-16, 15:46
Hello, I am a Canadian citizen with no British ancestry. However, I am seeking to become British. I was made in England but not born there. I wish to be recognized as a British national, and wish to naturalize. How tough is it compared to an American or a Japanese? How much advantage do we have over others? Are we classifed as foreigners or aliens when we go through immigration or do we line up with the British nationals when arriving at Hethrow airport. I plan to find a nice English lady when I go there, and hope to marry and raise a family. I am a full blooded Caucasian, but I have a B.A. in Japanese, and wish to become a Japanese teacher in England. Is it possible?

This used to be the case if you had British ancestors and could prove so (Like myself), but I believe they changed the law in the last 20-25 years. Now, the only people who have immediate access are Pakistanis and Arabs.

Aaron1981
26-08-16, 15:46
Canadians do actually get priority over other immigrants if they can prove British ancestry. I met 2 Canadians once who automatically got a visa in the UK because of this. They proved their ancestry back to an expelled Scottish clan.

I don't think you can do this anymore.

zudnic
26-08-16, 16:59
The only barrier is immigration. In that, its similar to Canadians and the U.S.. A lot easier if you are rich or have ancestor ties. My family is mostly English and Scottish heritage. My cousins could get British citizenship. My aunt by marriage their mother was born in London and immigrated to Canada in the 1960's. You need close ties like this now. A friend of mine was born in Canada, her father was British. She has a British passport. But doesn't have the right to abode in the UK. So even if you get British citizenship, you still have immigration hurdles to live there. There is also different rules for Canadian citizens and nationals born in certain periods. Canadian citizenship didn't exist until 1947. Prior to this date, you where considered a British Subject and Canadian national. Since my father was born before Canadian citizenship as in before 1947, he can get a British passport as a British Subject. But he'd still need to immigrate to the UK to live and vote there.

LeBrok
27-08-16, 02:17
The only barrier is immigration. In that, its similar to Canadians and the U.S.. A lot easier if you are rich or have ancestor ties. My family is mostly English and Scottish heritage. My cousins could get British citizenship. My aunt by marriage their mother was born in London and immigrated to Canada in the 1960's. You need close ties like this now. A friend of mine was born in Canada, her father was British. She has a British passport. But doesn't have the right to abode in the UK. So even if you get British citizenship, you still have immigration hurdles to live there. There is also different rules for Canadian citizens and nationals born in certain periods. Canadian citizenship didn't exist until 1947. Prior to this date, you where considered a British Subject and Canadian national. Since my father was born before Canadian citizenship as in before 1947, he can get a British passport as a British Subject. But he'd still need to immigrate to the UK to live and vote there.
Interesting nuances. Welcome to Eupedia Zudnic.

Mango
06-01-19, 12:12
Sorry but you’re mistaken on all of that.

“Even if you get a British citizenship, you don't become a British national”

Well what else would you be? If you get British Citizenship then you are a British Citizen a British National is a different type of British Nationality there’s 6 kinds of British Nationalities but I suspect that Citizen not National is what you mean.

On all passports by law they need to list place of birth and nationality. So you get a British passport, it would say nationality and list the Canadian city you where born in”

It would say: Take mine for example my British Passport says:
nationality BRITISH CITIZEN
place of birth: ORAN

it only lists the town or city of birth even if abroad never the country unless there could be confusion with any other place of the same name so let’s say for the sake of argument that there’s a place here also called ORAN my British passport would then say: ORAN, ALG
or ORAN,ALGERIA
only a British Citizen can have a British Passport therefore there would only be one nationality listed in the bio page.

“As such, you don't need British citizenship to have rights of a citizen in the UK”

Canadians are not British they’re subject to immigration control like anyone else they don’t have the same rights as me because that would make them British which they’re not you do need British Citizenship to have the rights I have (A Canadian can’t claim state benefits but I can as a British Citizen, they’re not entitled to use the NHS for free but as a citizen it’s my right to be able to u it for free)

By law you have the same rights as a Canadian as a British citizen in the UK. You can even vote if you live in the UK as a Canadian.

No they don’t. Pre 1947, when the Canadian Nationality Act became effective, anyone living in Canada was considered a British subject; Canada, in this sense, did not have its own citizens yet. ... If you were a British subject who was born in Canada (and had not emigrated), you became a Canadian.

Mango
06-01-19, 12:17
Even if you get a British citizenship, you don't become a British national. On all passports by law they need to list place of birth and nationality. So you get a British passport, it would say nationality and list the Canadian city you where born in. For international travel, in some ways a Canadian passport is just as good, as a British. The British only gets you into three more countries visa free VS the Canadian.
Canadian constitution says:
Despite the statute of Westminster and the repatriation of the Constitution, Canada is still British! Fact even if you get British citizenship, doesn't give the right to live in the UK! Fact under British law, a Canadian is considered a British Subject in the UK. They know call it commonwealth citizen. As such, you don't need British citizenship to have rights of a citizen in the UK. By law you have the same rights as a Canadian as a British citizen in the UK. You can even vote if you live in the UK as a Canadian.
Sorry but you’re mistaken on all of that.
“Even if you get a British citizenship, you don't become a British national”
Well what else would you be? If you get British Citizenship then you are a British Citizen a British National is a different type of British Nationality there’s 6 kinds of British Nationalities but I suspect that Citizen not National is what you mean.
On all passports by law they need to list place of birth and nationality. So you get a British passport, it would say nationality and list the Canadian city you where born in”
It would say: Take mine for example my British Passport says:
nationality BRITISH CITIZEN
place of birth: ORAN
it only lists the town or city of birth even if abroad never the country unless there could be confusion with any other place of the same name so let’s say for the sake of argument that there’s a place here also called ORAN my British passport would then say: ORAN, ALG
or ORAN,ALGERIA
only a British Citizen can have a British Passport therefore there would only be one nationality listed in the bio page.
“As such, you don't need British citizenship to have rights of a citizen in the UK”
Canadians are not British they’re subject to immigration control like anyone else they don’t have the same rights as me because that would make them British which they’re not you do need British Citizenship to have the rights I have (A Canadian can’t claim state benefits but I can as a British Citizen, they’re not entitled to use the NHS for free but as a citizen it’s my right to be able to u it for free)
By law you have the same rights as a Canadian as a British citizen in the UK. You can even vote if you live in the UK as a Canadian.
No they don’t. Pre 1947, when the Canadian Nationality Act became effective, anyone living in Canada was considered a British subject; Canada, in this sense, did not have its own citizens yet. ... If you were a British subject who was born in Canada (and had not emigrated), you became a Canadian.
Some elections they can vote in yes.