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View Full Version : If you could live anywhere in the world, where would you go ?



Maciamo
09-05-07, 17:18
Imagine that you are fed up with your life where you live at the moment and need change. Or that you have won the lottery and can afford to live in the place of your dreams. Or that some unfortunate events force you to leave your place of residence. Or any other reason that would make you want to move.

The world is yours, you do not have to worry about visas, job or money. Where would you choose to live ? Which continent, which country, which city ?

Kinsao
10-05-07, 11:42
Hmmm, that's really hard, because I haven't been to many places. :( At least, not to live for anywhere near long enough to be able to tell whether I'd like to live there near-permanently. I mean, going on holiday is obviously a lot different from being 'stuck' somewhere for ever, and I'm sure many places that seem really idyllic would certainly have their down-sides!

I'd probably end up settling in the highlands of Scotland. :P (Although only if my lottery money would run to a private helicopter, so I could still have a social life up and down the UK! :giggle: )

Before settling down permanently in my gothic mansion on the edge of an isolated loch, though, I'd like to pay extended visits to France, Italy, Switzerland, Hungary, Latvia, Arizona and Sri Lanka. :-)

Elizabeth van Kampen
22-05-07, 19:22
I am far too old now, but if I could do it all over again, I would really love to live in France. Normandy has stolen my heart.

Alma
22-05-07, 21:51
Imagine that you are fed up with your life where you live at the moment and need change.

:( unfortunately I do not need to imagine that. it is actually just a couple of my dearest people that holding me here and making my leaving soon extremely hard. :(
i am actually moving to japan in couple of months, for few years.

anyway, I would love to live anywhere in Europe. UK, Italy, France, Austria...oh and Spain of course... and not just big cities... everywhere... eh

Ma Cherie
30-05-07, 07:41
Imagine that you are fed up with your life where you live at the moment and need change. Or that you have won the lottery and can afford to live in the place of your dreams. Or that some unfortunate events force you to leave your place of residence. Or any other reason that would make you want to move.

The world is yours, you do not have to worry about visas, job or money. Where would you choose to live ? Which continent, which country, which city ?

If I were fed up with life in Kansas City I would move in a heartbeat if I won the lottery. There's no upward mobility in KC, and I know that when I finish graduate school I'm leaving KC to find another job elsewhere.

I would love to live in several parts of Europe, like Venice, Italy and Nice, France. Maybe somewhere in the Netherlands. I would love to live in London because it's a very diverse city. If I could live in Asia, I would move to Hong Kong or a city in Japan, probably Osaka. I would even enjoy living in the United Arab Emirates, Dubai in particular. There's a lot of places I would choose to live.

Supernova
01-07-08, 17:21
I would love to live in several parts of Europe, like Venice, Italy and Nice, France. Maybe somewhere in the Netherlands. I would love to live in London because it's a very diverse city. If I could live in Asia, I would move to Hong Kong or a city in Japan, probably Osaka. I would even enjoy living in the United Arab Emirates, Dubai in particular. There's a lot of places I would choose to live.


Totally agree!!! :D

Chris
26-06-09, 23:46
Same country (England) - but more rural.

Atzerrian
20-07-10, 22:47
I would return home to Spain. I would also consider the Azores Islands, Iceland, Ireland, Southwest France, or Norway.

Other attractive places include the American Pacific Northwest (Canadian Southwest) and Santa Catarina in Brazil.

^ lynx ^
23-07-10, 14:00
Certainly you wouldn't go back to Mexico.

solarmkd
23-07-10, 14:09
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keyoghettson
27-11-10, 04:07
I live in the Skåneland (aka Scania). Skåneland consist of the four provinces Skåne, Halland, Blekinge and Bornholm. Skåne, Halland and Blekinge belong to Sweden. Bornholm belongs to Denmark. We want to have our own nation. We are not Swedes or Danes. I don't want to live in Skåneland because we don't have our own nation. There are many wonderful places around the world. I will probably move to the US in the future.

Rastko Pocesta
29-04-11, 01:18
1. Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2. The Hague, The Netherlands
3. London (City of Westminster), United Kingdom
4. Inverness, United Kingdom
5. Aberdeen, United Kingdom
6. Edinburgh, United Kingdom
7. Glasgow, United Kingdom
8. Reykjavik, Iceland
9. Vienna, Austria
10. Prague, Czech Republic
11. Montpelier, Vermont, United States
12. Geneva, Switzerland

MaryLane
17-01-12, 05:40
If i could live anywhere in world maybe I choose to live in South America. Well maybe Brazil.. Facts about Brazil they have the best destinations in the world RIO, they amazing beaches, and they have great carnivals... Plus they have the world’s best and most delicious coffee.

Nugget
12-04-12, 04:19
Scotland. Probably Glasgow.

edao
13-04-12, 06:20
Scotland. Probably Glasgow.

Great choice!:good_job: Once you've been I'd recommend, Bagdad, Tehran, Monrovia, Pyongyang and than maybe the depths of hell itself.:grin:

hope
13-04-12, 20:10
I would like to live on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland. That was the main reason I began learning Gáidhlig.
One down point is I have a low body temperature and Lewis is even colder than N.Ireland but I still like the thought of it nonetheless.

Nugget
14-04-12, 00:08
Great choice!:good_job: Once you've been I'd recommend, Bagdad, Tehran, Monrovia, Pyongyang and than maybe the depths of hell itself.:grin:

Tee hee hee. When I received the e-mail with your message, before logging in, I knew you would be a Scot! Been there a number of times. Love your country. On my way back in May. I'm heading straight to Hell, Jr...ooppss, I mean Glasgow. A'll pit up a wird for ye luv! :laughing:

Barrister
09-05-13, 04:30
Colorado, United States of America.

Somewhere in the mountains.

Grubbe
15-05-13, 23:11
I think I would have gone to some other place in Europe, perhaps to a small village in Italy or France, where it is not so freezing cold in winter. :smile:

LeBrok
16-05-13, 04:57
I think I would have gone to some other place in Europe, perhaps to a small village in Italy or France, where it is not so freezing cold in winter. :smile:
I'm with ya!

errantbit
03-10-13, 00:43
Some quiet place far from civilization but developed enough to provide me an easy access to some basic commodities.

Jackson
03-10-13, 22:45
Maybe Iceland, somewhere in rural England (perhaps the Welsh marches or somewhere in East Anglia or the south-west), or just somewhere rural in the British Isles in general. Failing all of those i might give Canada a go.

Twilight
06-10-13, 04:55
There is something attractive to me about England, plus I have 2nd cousins in London so I wouldn't be alone. :)

individual1st
22-03-15, 01:19
Barcelona
1-Mediterranean city
2-Perfect architecture
3-Great foods
4-FC Barcelona
5-Cultural events

apie3000
12-12-17, 09:03
Brazil, in the Amazon Rain forest.

Mich Glitch
12-12-17, 20:33
I've answered the question 25 yrs ago and moved. Montreal, Canada.

01-11-19, 22:42
I live in San Diego, California, which is pretty fine, so you'd need an atom bomb to pry me out of here. If, however, I had to pick a spot outside the U.S., it would be Switzerland. A beautiful country and one which is not on the front line of politics, which these days bores/scares me.

What's interesting to me is that I have neighbors who are Germans. They've lived in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, all places in which the dad worked for a major multi-national. Their move here was job-related, but when he got assigned back to Europe, the rest of the family stayed here where the children went to school/university and eventually married. So they made their decision, though I don't know why. It can't just be the cold winters, can it?

Angela
01-11-19, 23:14
I live in San Diego, California, which is pretty fine, so you'd need an atom bomb to pry me out of here. If, however, I had to pick a spot outside the U.S., it would be Switzerland. A beautiful country and one which is not on the front line of politics, which these days bores/scares me.

What's interesting to me is that I have neighbors who are Germans. They've lived in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, all places in which the dad worked for a major multi-national. Their move here was job-related, but when he got assigned back to Europe, the rest of the family stayed here where the children went to school/university and eventually married. So they made their decision, though I don't know why. It can't just be the cold winters, can it?

If the children spent their formative years here and had most of their education here I can understand it. Otherwise, not really.

bigsnake49
03-11-19, 17:50
1. San Diego-La Jolla area
2. Barcelona
3. Santa Clara, California
4. Austin, TX

Angela
03-11-19, 18:09
1. San Diego-La Jolla area
2. Barcelona
3. Santa Clara, California
4. Austin, TX

Good choices all, imo, except for Austin. I would literally die if I had to live through a Texas summer; heck it's more like six months a year. I swear, I think it's worse than Florida, which in other ways is a great place to live if you pick the right spot.

04-11-19, 00:03
Spent a few days in San Antonio, near Austin. Loved the river walk, but like Angela says, the summer is a killer and I lived most of my youth in Phoenix so I know heat (or course I wouldn't go back to live there either).

Farstar
04-11-19, 13:26
The question of the OP needs refinements. The first question is: what is your culture of origin? What is your age and working status?

A second point is that climate matters a lot. Climate does not change (much). Instead, job prospects ... it depends. Of course, mutatis mutandis it is better to be in a rich city. But maybe you can be also well off in another, less wealthy place.

I live in Barcelona and I like it a lot.

California would also be a great place to live for me, I am sure.

I have lived in colder places, and I felt miserable about it. Instead, hot can be uncomfortable sometimes, but I prefer it a lot more than cold. But others are the opposite.

José Mª
22-08-20, 01:05
I've been recently looking for "remote" places and I think knowing you're there would definitely make some effect on my and I find them quite interesting, even though at first you may think there's not much to do. I still think they're curious. I'd say Puerto Williams (Chile) and Kliuchí/Ключи ​(Russia, Kamchatka Peninsula).

Carlos
22-08-20, 04:18
There would be at least two places, one where it rained a lot or at least two or three days in a row, I imagine a more bucolic location and a large capital with a lot of movement, people and offers. Therefore a place where it rained near a large city or capital.


In x time my interests would have changed and I would look for another combination although always with a big city nearby

bigsnake49
29-08-20, 16:51
Spent a few days in San Antonio, near Austin. Loved the river walk, but like Angela says, the summer is a killer and I lived most of my youth in Phoenix so I know heat (or course I wouldn't go back to live there either).

San Antonio and Austin have a different climate. I know they're only 78 miles apart but it just felt different. I spend 2.5 years in Austin and although it gets hot, it is tolerable. San Antonio on the other hand...a lot more humid. Orlando...yikes. One thing about Florida it rains in the afternoon in the summer and it cools down.

blevins13
30-08-20, 12:57
San Antonio and Austin have a different climate. I know they're only 78 miles apart but it just felt different. I spend 2.5 years in Austin and although it gets hot, it is tolerable. San Antonio on the other hand...a lot more humid. Orlando...yikes. One thing about Florida it rains in the afternoon in the summer and it cools down.

What were you doing in Austin? If you can tell?


Sent from my iPhone using Eupedia Forum (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=89698)

bigsnake49
31-08-20, 19:43
What were you doing in Austin? If you can tell?


Sent from my iPhone using Eupedia Forum (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=89698)

I am a consultant to electric utilities and I was helping ERCOT, the Texas regional ISO specify, document and test their new market management system and help integrated it to the rest of their systems. BTW, I have lived in the US since 73, if it's not clear.

Crank
05-09-20, 07:17
Not sure, either in my homeland or same country as now

Maciamo
05-09-20, 13:36
I have spent a lot of time analysing and comparing all possible indicators between countries. Based on the quality of life, well being, freedom, housing, healthcare, crime rate, pollution, education, and so on, countries that typically come on top are: Switzerland, Austria, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Australia and Canada.

Considering that over 90% of Scandinavian people are fluent in English, language would not be an issue. I would have no problem in Switzerland either.

Taking the climate into account, I would reject Iceland, Norway, Sweden and Canada. Australia is generally too hot, although Melbourne and Tasmania would be tolerable.

The main drawback with Australia and New Zealand is that they are so far away from everywhere else. That's not convenient for someone like me who likes to travel. The distance would be felt for consumer products too. I would also miss the wide range of European food products that are available in supermarkets here. Imported products may be available in a few select shops in big cities (as I found they were in Tokyo), but would be several times more expensive and would require to go to these luxury food shops. I have lived in Australia and really didn't appreciate the presence of giant spiders everywhere.

This leaves Denmark, the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland and New Zealand. I have been to these countries except NZ, and I did not find life to be very different from Belgium. Belgium and the Netherlands are very similar. Belgium ranks lower in some indicators because some industrial cities with higher unemployment and poverty (Charleroi, Mons, Liège) bring the average down. Even so, Belgians enjoy the largest houses in Europe along with the Swiss and Norwegians, but with a higher ratio of house-to-apartments and higher home ownership than Switzerland. The weather and the food are better than in Scandinavia. Belgium has a more beautiful scenery than Denmark or the Netherlands, which are completely flat and boring. When all factors are taken into account, I feel that only Switzerland and Austria can rival with the better parts of Belgium.

I don't think I would ever choose to live in the USA for a number of reasons. Top on the list are the high crime rate (especially homicides), guns, too many religious fanatics, religion pervading most aspects of society and politics, the highly confrontational culture, the blatant gap between the have's and have not's... If I really had to live in the US, I guess I would choose somewhere in New York/New England (although it gets as cold as in Scandinavia in winter) or a good area around San Francisco (e.g. Berkeley, Santa Clara) or southern California (I hear Orange County is nice). Despite the great climate, California has shortcomings of its own too, like wildfires and earthquakes.

Archetype0ne
05-09-20, 14:20
I have spent a lot of time analysing and comparing all possible indicators between countries. Based on the quality of life, well being, freedom, housing, healthcare, crime rate, pollution, education, and so on, countries that typically come on top are: Switzerland, Austria, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Australia and Canada.

Considering that over 90% of Scandinavian people are fluent in English, language would not be an issue. I would have no problem in Switzerland either.

Taking the climate into account, I would reject Iceland, Norway, Sweden and Canada. Australia is generally too hot, although Melbourne and Tasmania would be tolerable.

The main drawback with Australia and New Zealand is that they are so far away from everywhere else. That's not convenient for someone like me who likes to travel. The distance would be felt for consumer products too. I would also miss the wide range of European food products that are available in supermarkets here. Imported products may be available in a few select shops in big cities (as I found they were in Tokyo), but would be several times more expensive and would require to go to these luxury food shops. I have lived in Australia and really didn't appreciate the presence of giant spiders everywhere.

This leaves Denmark, the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland and New Zealand. I have been to these countries except NZ, and I did not find life to be very different from Belgium. Belgium and the Netherlands are very similar. Belgium ranks lower in some indicators because some industrial cities with higher unemployment and poverty (Charleroi, Mons, Liège) bring the average down. Even so, Belgians enjoy the largest houses in Europe along with the Swiss and Norwegians, but with a higher ratio of house-to-apartments and higher home ownership than Switzerland. The weather and the food are better than in Scandinavia. Belgium has a more beautiful scenery than Denmark or the Netherlands, which are completely flat and boring. When all factors are taken into account, I feel that only Switzerland and Austria can rival with the better parts of Belgium.

I don't think I would ever choose to live in the USA for a number of reasons. Top on the list are the high crime rate (especially homicides), guns, too many religious fanatics, religion pervading most aspects of society and politics, the highly confrontational culture, the blatant gap between the have's and have not's... If I really had to live in the US, I guess I would choose somewhere in New England (although it gets as cold as in Scandinavia in winter) or a good area around San Francisco (e.g. Berkeley, Santa Clara) or southern California (I hear Orange County is nice). Despite the great climate, California has shortcomings of its own too, like wildfires and earthquakes.

Very concise and interesting point of view Maciamo.
I would say I agree with 99% of what you said (but you already know that :) ). The 1% probably being nuance.

I am surprised you did not mention Japan.
Japan was on my mind. And despite adoring their values and culture, I personally did not mention it in my desired destinations, because I doubt I would fit in/ enjoy fitting in within the culture. (Very traditional/ hierarchical/ strict on some aspects of life)
So I wonder what was your reasons for not including such a country? I mean I am aware that in the international indexes for various measurements they do not really rank at the top (top 10), but are there any other reasons? You having lived there, I would love to hear your opinion.

For me Japan and Singapore share similar reasons, why despite me ranking them high in where I would live, I would still opt for other options.

Maciamo
05-09-20, 20:35
Very concise and interesting point of view Maciamo.
I would say I agree with 99% of what you said (but you already know that :) ). The 1% probably being nuance.

I am surprised you did not mention Japan.
Japan was on my mind. And despite adoring their values and culture, I personally did not mention it in my desired destinations, because I doubt I would fit in/ enjoy fitting in within the culture. (Very traditional/ hierarchical/ strict on some aspects of life)
So I wonder what was your reasons for not including such a country? I mean I am aware that in the international indexes for various measurements they do not really rank at the top (top 10), but are there any other reasons? You having lived there, I would love to hear your opinion.

For me Japan and Singapore share similar reasons, why despite me ranking them high in where I would live, I would still opt for other options.

My experience of living in Japan left me with mixed feelings about the country.

The pros:

- Great food and relatively cheap restaurants
- Excellent service in shops and in general
- Extensive and reliable railway and metro networks
- Clean streets
- Peaceful people and very low crime rate (you can leave your wallet in a public place and it will be there an hour later)
- Mostly atheistic society where religion and politics rarely enter discussions
- Lots of mountains and forests for hiking
- Convenience stores and vending machines everywhere

The cons:

- Little care for aesthetics in urban planning (lots of ugly buildings, non-buried electric lines everywhere, concrete all along the coastline and hillsides, few parks in cities, etc.)
- Lack of thermic isolation and central heating in houses
- 5-month-long hot and muggy summers
- Lots of natural disasters (earthquakes, typhoons, landslides, floods...)
- Assumptions that foreigners in Japan commit much more crimes than the Japanese and as a consequence frequent police checks on non Japanese people
- As a foreigner it is very hard to fit in and feel accepted, even if you speak Japanese and know the culture like a native
- Discrimination in general (toward women, young people, foreigners, burakumin...)
- Most people are workaholics, but salaries are nevertheless not that high anymore (Japan's GDP per capita, once the highest in the world, has fallen to the level of Italy or Spain despite the fact that the Japanese work long hours and take very few holidays).

05-09-20, 21:30
Very concise and interesting point of view Maciamo.
I would say I agree with 99% of what you said (but you already know that :) ). The 1% probably being nuance.

I am surprised you did not mention Japan.
Japan was on my mind. And despite adoring their values and culture, I personally did not mention it in my desired destinations, because I doubt I would fit in/ enjoy fitting in within the culture. (Very traditional/ hierarchical/ strict on some aspects of life)
So I wonder what was your reasons for not including such a country? I mean I am aware that in the international indexes for various measurements they do not really rank at the top (top 10), but are there any other reasons? You having lived there, I would love to hear your opinion.

For me Japan and Singapore share similar reasons, why despite me ranking them high in where I would live, I would still opt for other options.

I’ve visited Singapore several times; beautiful city, very nice people. However, when it’s hot, it’s wicked hot.

Angela
05-09-20, 23:55
I’ve visited Singapore several times; beautiful city, very nice people. However, when it’s hot, it’s wicked hot.

Right where you are would be high on my list at this point in my life.

Right where I am is also great; near Long Island Sound on the north shore of eastern Nassau County and Suffolk County. That's assuming NYC comes back and is available for trips in. I was usually in at least every other week, sometimes once a week.

Aaron1981
06-09-20, 04:10
@Maciamo

You have obviously never been to Canada. Southern BC and southern Ontario are relatively mild, the former most definitely is. The majority of the Canadian population lives within 100 miles of the US border, not in the untamed wilderness of the north.

Politically I dislike both Canada and the USA. Europe is equally too PC. I like the sounds of Australia, but the hot climate and wildlife would need some getting used to.

Angela
06-09-20, 04:21
A lot of the big money has been moving to New Zealand for at least a decade, if not two.

Maciamo
06-09-20, 10:28
@Maciamo
You have obviously never been to Canada. Southern BC and southern Ontario are relatively mild, the former most definitely is. The majority of the Canadian population lives within 100 miles of the US border, not in the untamed wilderness of the north.
As a matter of fact I have been to Canada (Ontario and Quebec). I have good friends in Montreal, both Canadians and Belgians who moved there.
When I say it's too cold in Canada in winter, I am not talking about Nunavut (where practically nobody lives), but the big cities in the south. Perhaps you don't realise just how mild in the winters are in Northwest Europe. In Belgium, which is colder in winter than Ireland or southern England, over the last 10 years it has snowed only 3 winters and never more than a week in total. Recently it hardly even freezes, even at night in the middle of winter.
Here are some comparisons of climate between Northwest European cities and Canadian and Northeast US ones from Weather Spark (https://weatherspark.com/compare/y/33845~19863/Comparison-of-the-Average-Weather-in-Dublin-and-Toronto).
https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-Dublin_Toronto.png
https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-London_Ottawa.png
https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-Amsterdam_New_York.png
https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-Brussels-Montreal.png
https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-Paris_Boston.png
Let's move a bit more inland in Canada and compare that to Scandinavia.
https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-Copenhagen_Calgary.png
https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-Stockholm_Edmonton.png
As you can see, even Stockholm, which is way up north (higher than the northern tip of Scotland) is warmer in winter than Calgary or Edmonton and about the same as Toronto. That's still a bit too cold for me. I don't like extreme temperatures. I like a climate in the green and yellow on the chart above. The only major Canadian city with a climate comparable to Northwest Europe is Vancouver.


If we were to compare major European and North American cities for the climate. The most similar pairs would be:

Edmonton => no equivalent in Europe. Even Helsinki and Moscow are considerably warmer in winter.
Québec, Montreal, Ottawa => no European city gets so cold in winter.

Calgary <=> Stockholm and Oslo
Toronto <=> Winters like Stockholm and Oslo, but Toronto gets much hotter in summer

Boston, New York <=> Vienna, Budapest (although NYC and Boston get a bit colder in winter and hotter in summer)
Washington DC <=> Florence and Madrid, although DC gets a bit colder in winter.
Chicago <=> Kiev, Rostov-on-Don (no city in Western or Central Europe gets that cold in winter)

Vancouver <=> London, Amsterdam, Brussels, Cologne
Seattle <=> Paris

Californian cities have no equivalent in Europe except in the Canary Islands.

Maciamo
06-09-20, 10:59
As I said above I have spent a lot of time comparing countries and cities trying to select the best places to live. I also have more international experience than the majority of people, having been to nearly 50 countries on all continents and lived in seven on three continents. But having been somewhere doesn't mean you have experienced the climate of that place, which would require living there several years as summers and winters vary in intensity each year. That's why it's better to stick to climate statistics to remain objective.

Impressions are deceptive too. It's not because a city is located further north on the map that it is necessarily colder. Berlin is over 1000 km due north of Zürich, but it is warmer both in winter and summer. That's because Zürich is close to the mountains. But even Vienna, lying on the Pannonian plain, is colder than Berlin, Brussels, Amsterdam, London or Dublin in winter.

https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-Vienna_Zurich_Berlin.png


Lot's of people like the Mediterranean climate. In my experience, it's not that different from the Benelux and southern England in winter, but too hot in summer.


https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-Rome_Barcelona_Nice.png

The best cities for climate in Australia and New Zealand would be Melbourne and Auckland (hence their popularity).
https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-Melbourne_Auckland.png

In the US and Canada a similarly mild climate all year round is found in Seattle and Vancouver (both also hugely popular with foreigners choosing to move to those countries).

https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-Seatlle_Vancouver.png


San Francisco has maybe the best climate of all. It's not surprising that big tech decided to set up camp there. Los Angeles gets a bit too hot in summer, so San Diego is better in southern Cal.
https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-SF_LA_SD.png

In East Asia big cities like Tokyo, Nagoya, Osaka, Shanghai, Hong Kong and Taipei all get far too hot and muggy during the (long) summer. Singapore is unbearable all year round. I got sick there because of constantly moving from the sweltering outdoor to the cool air-conditioned indoor. Never got sick anywhere else in Southeast Asia, India, China, Japan or Australia.

https://www.eupedia.com/images/Climate-Tokyo_Taipei_Singapore.png

Jovialis
06-09-20, 15:15
I have spent a lot of time analysing and comparing all possible indicators between countries. Based on the quality of life, well being, freedom, housing, healthcare, crime rate, pollution, education, and so on, countries that typically come on top are: Switzerland, Austria, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Australia and Canada.

Considering that over 90% of Scandinavian people are fluent in English, language would not be an issue. I would have no problem in Switzerland either.

Taking the climate into account, I would reject Iceland, Norway, Sweden and Canada. Australia is generally too hot, although Melbourne and Tasmania would be tolerable.

The main drawback with Australia and New Zealand is that they are so far away from everywhere else. That's not convenient for someone like me who likes to travel. The distance would be felt for consumer products too. I would also miss the wide range of European food products that are available in supermarkets here. Imported products may be available in a few select shops in big cities (as I found they were in Tokyo), but would be several times more expensive and would require to go to these luxury food shops. I have lived in Australia and really didn't appreciate the presence of giant spiders everywhere.

This leaves Denmark, the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland and New Zealand. I have been to these countries except NZ, and I did not find life to be very different from Belgium. Belgium and the Netherlands are very similar. Belgium ranks lower in some indicators because some industrial cities with higher unemployment and poverty (Charleroi, Mons, Liège) bring the average down. Even so, Belgians enjoy the largest houses in Europe along with the Swiss and Norwegians, but with a higher ratio of house-to-apartments and higher home ownership than Switzerland. The weather and the food are better than in Scandinavia. Belgium has a more beautiful scenery than Denmark or the Netherlands, which are completely flat and boring. When all factors are taken into account, I feel that only Switzerland and Austria can rival with the better parts of Belgium.

I don't think I would ever choose to live in the USA for a number of reasons. Top on the list are the high crime rate (especially homicides), guns, too many religious fanatics, religion pervading most aspects of society and politics, the highly confrontational culture, the blatant gap between the have's and have not's... If I really had to live in the US, I guess I would choose somewhere in New York/New England (although it gets as cold as in Scandinavia in winter) or a good area around San Francisco (e.g. Berkeley, Santa Clara) or southern California (I hear Orange County is nice). Despite the great climate, California has shortcomings of its own too, like wildfires and earthquakes.

The areas just outside New York City, are more ideal, imo. You get access to all of the high culture, restaurants, etc., but are a comfortable distance from the pandemonium. In the City, you get more of the highly confrontational culture, as well as pollution, congestion, lunatics, and homelessness. Also, you can smell the sewer, which I loath.

With parking apps like Spot Hero, it is easy to find parking, when driving into the city. It is much better than taking public transportation, which can be very exhausting, unpleasant, and time-consuming. As well as dangerous, considering the pandemic.

Alcuin
08-09-20, 19:54
I like living in England/UK, but if I had to move to another country I'd probably opt for Australia, New Zealand or the US. Canada seems a bit boring to me, lacking the history of the US or even Australia and its landscapes appealing to me less than those of NZ. Countries such as the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, etc are interesting holiday destinations but as a monolingual it would be folly to attempt a relocation there. If I had a local wife it would make them better choices and integration easier, but they'd still have to be Anglophiles keen on spending large parts of the year in Britain to steal my heart ;^)

Salento
23-09-20, 22:02
2020 USA - Top 20 places to live ..., :satisfied:

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/money-announces-the-2020-best-places-to-live-in-the-us-as-the-pandemic-prompts-a-shift-away-from-urban-living-301135798.html

Duarte
24-09-20, 00:51
2020 USA - Top 20 places to live ..., :satisfied:

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/money-announces-the-2020-best-places-to-live-in-the-us-as-the-pandemic-prompts-a-shift-away-from-urban-living-301135798.html

:good_job:

https://i.imgur.com/We9tSPv.jpg
@ Salento
Belo Horizonte: Pleasant nights and mornings all year round (comfortable or cool) and warm afternoons, but never too hot (and also never very cold, freezing or frigid) :grin:

Salento
24-09-20, 01:49
:good_job:

https://i.imgur.com/We9tSPv.jpg
@ Salento
Belo Horizonte: Pleasant nights and mornings all year round (comfortable or cool) and warm afternoons, but never too hot (and also never very cold, freezing or frigid) :grin:

Its also about the “Amazing” people, ... If I move to Belo Horizonte, it will also become one the Best Places to live on Earth :grin:

Edit:
... Modesty is not my strong suit ... lol

Belo Horizonte is already Great :)

qpi4z
02-12-20, 17:24
I am far too old now, but if I could do it all over again, I would really love to live in France. Normandy has stolen my heart.