PDA

View Full Version : Maciamo's book selection



Maciamo
09-05-09, 13:53
I am interested in nearly all the domain of human knowledge. That makes a generalist rather than a specialist, which is also the nature of the philosopher always craving to understand better the world around us.

There is too much information out there to waste time reading uninteresting or badly written books. I have selected here the works which I think are the best at summarising the knowledge in their field while being well written enough to be comprehensible and enjoyable for lay people. I have intentionally left out books that were too heavy or too technical.

History of Philosophy

Sophie's World, by Jostein Gaarder
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Sophiesworld.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0374530718?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0374530718)

History of the Universe, Earth, Life and Sciences

A Short History of Nearly Everything, by Bill Bryson
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/history_everything.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/076790818X?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=076790818X)

History of Society, Lifestyle and Technologies

At Home: A short history of private life, by Bill Bryson
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/at_home.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0552772550?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0552772550)

Neurology & Psychology

The Human Mind: And How to Make the Most of It, by Robert Winston
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/HumanMind.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0553816195?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0553816195)

Gender Psychology

Why Men Don't Listen and Women Can't Read Maps, by Allan & Barbara Pease
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/WMDL.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0767907639?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0767907639)

Population History & Anthropology

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, by Jared Diamond
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/guns-germs-steel.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0393061310?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0393061310)

Genetics & Evolution

The 10,000 Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution, by Gregory Cochran & Henry Harpending
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/10000-explosion.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0465002218?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0465002218)

Genetics & Biology

Genome, by Matt Ridley
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/genome.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/185702835X?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=185702835X)

Linguistics

The Story of English, by Robert McCrum, Robert MacNeil & William Cran
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/story-english.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0142002313?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0142002313)

Language history

Empires of the Word: A Language History of the World, by Nicholas Ostler
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Empires_Word.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0007118716?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=0007118716)


Economics & History

Seeds of Change : Six plants that transformed mankind, by Henry Hobhouse
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/seeds_of_change.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0330493167?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=0330493167)


Evolutionary Biology & Genetics

The Ancestor's Tale, by Richard Dawkins
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Ancestors_tale.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0753819961?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=0753819961)

Maciamo
31-07-09, 11:17
Other great books but requiring a bit more knowledge in the field to be properly enjoyed :

Evolutionary Genetics

The Selfish Gene, by Richard Dawkins
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/selfish-gene.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0199291152?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0199291152)

Human Genetics

The Agile Gene: How Nature Turns on Nurture , by Matt Ridley
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/agile_gene.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/006000679X?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=006000679X)

Maciamo
25-11-09, 19:08
Here are something travelogues, which I enjoy for their writing style and the writer's personal insight into the hidden facets of the countries visited.

I am a big fan of Bill Bryson. I have read almost all his books now. Here are my three favourite ones (besides A Short History of Everything), respectively about the USA, England and Australia :

The Lost Continent: Travels in Small Town America
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Lost_Continent.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0552998087?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=0552998087)

Notes from a Small Island
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Small_Island.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0552996009?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=0552996009)

Down Under
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Down_Under.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/055299703X?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=055299703X)

Jan Morris is also a favourite travel writer :

A Writer's World: Travels 1950-2000
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Writers_world.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/9780571215256?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=9780571215256)


About Japan

The Roads to Sata: A 2000-mile Walk Through Japan, by Alan Booth
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Roads_Sata.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1568361874?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=1568361874)

Looking for the Lost: Journeys Through a Vanishing Japan, by Alan Booth
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Looking_Lost.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1568361483?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=1568361483)

Lost Japan, by Alex Kerr
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Lost_Japan.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1741795230?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=1741795230)

Maciamo
07-01-10, 12:24
Anyone interested in the Indo-Europeans and the migrations that took place in Europe during the Neolithic and Bronze Age should read these books :


The Horse, The Wheel, and Language: How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World , by David W. Anthony
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Horse_Wheel.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0691058873?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=0691058873)

(Let me say that I disagree a bit with chapter 14 though. Anthony doesn't think that a massive invasion of IE steppe people took place toward the Corded-Ware culture. I do because nothing else would explain the strong presence of R1a exactly within the boundaries of the Corded-Ware culture. The problem is that Anthony never mentions once Y-DNA studies, even though his book is from 2007.)

----

The Lost World of Old Europe: The Danube Valley, 5000-3500 BC, by David W. Anthony
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Old_Europe.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0691143889?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&link_code=as3&camp=2506&creative=9298&creativeASIN=0691143889)

This is a big-format, hard-cover book printed on glossy paper and contain a lot of colour pictures (archaeological remains) and maps. It deals with the Neolithic period in south-east Europe.

----

Encyclopedia of Prehistory: Europe (volume 4)
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Enc_Prehistory-4.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0306462583?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0306462583)

This is the most complete and detailed work on European prehistory with which I am familiar. It is among the very best, but is quite expensive.

Maciamo
11-01-12, 09:42
A few books about Atheism, and especially the New Atheism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Atheism) movement based on modern science (genetics, evolutionary biology, neuroscience and so on).

The God Delusion, by Richard Dawkins
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/God_Delusion.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/055277331X?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=055277331X)

Portable Atheist: Essential Readings for the Non-Believer, by Christopher Hitchens
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Portable_Atheist.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0306816083?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0306816083)

God is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything, by Christopher Hitchens
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/God_not_Great.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1843545748?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1843545748)

New Atheism, by Victor J. Stenger
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/New_Atheism.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1591027519?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1591027519)

God the Failed Hypothesis: How Science Shows That God Does Not Exist, by Victor J. Stenger
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/God_Failed.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1591026520?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1591026520)

Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon, by Daniel D. Dennett
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Breaking_Spell.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141017775?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141017775)

The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason, by Sam Harris
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/End_of_Faith.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0743268091?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0743268091)

Letter To A Christian Nation, by Sam Harris
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Letter_Christian_Nation.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0593058976?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0593058976)

Why I am Not a Christian: And Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects, by Bertrand Russell
http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Why_not_Christian.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0415325102?ie=UTF8&tag=eupedia-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0415325102)

Maciamo
11-07-13, 12:53
I would like to recommend these books on European history, all masterpieces.

Widely acclaimed as the best single-volume history of Italy to date,
The Pursuit of Italy: A History of a Land, its Regions and their Peoples, by David Gilmour (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141043415/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141043415&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) is one of the most vivid and elegantly written history books I have read. Note that half of the book is about modern Italy since the unification in the 1860's.

http://www.eupedia.com/images/books/Pursuit_of_Italy.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141043415/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141043415&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)


The New Spaniards, by John Hooper (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141016094/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141016094&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) is a very insightful look into recent Spanish history. There is no better account to understand how Spanish society and politics evolved in the 20th century.

http://www.eupedia.com/images/books/New_Spaniards.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141016094/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141016094&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)


More light-hearted and humorous, but nevertheless well researched, well-written and full of interesting anecdotes is 1000 Years of Annoying the French, by Stephen Clarke (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0552775746/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0552775746&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21).

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/1000_Annoying.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0552775746/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0552775746&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

mr_y82
01-04-16, 16:03
If you have an interest in the evolution of society and culture, and how this ties to the evolution of consciousness, religion, science, and everything else, I recommend the field of transpersonal psychology. Here's a good starting point that is from a kind of anthropological point of view.

Up from Eden: A Transpersonal View of Human Evolution (http://www.amazon.com/Up-Eden-Transpersonal-Human-Evolution/dp/0835607313)
Ken Wilber
7664



...

I get the impression you read occasionally. :laughing:

Thanks for sharing!

Maciamo
05-04-16, 17:00
Here are three of the best books I have read recently, all by one of my all time favourite authors, Mike Ridley (already listed above for Genome and The Agile Gene).


The Red Queen: Sex and the Evolution of Human Nature (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0140167722/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0140167722&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21), a masterful explanation of how sexual selection has shaped evolution, and especially human evolution. Chock-full with interesting facts.

http://www.eupedia.com/images/books/red_queen.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0140167722/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0140167722&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)


The Rational Optimist (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0007267126/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0007267126&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) makes a very good case of why we shouldn't pay too much attention to the alarming headlines in the news and should instead think, for good reasons, that most of the world's problems will work themselves out. A great read for anyone interested in history, society and economy.


http://www.eupedia.com/images/books/rational_optimist.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0007267126/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0007267126&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)


The Evolution of Everything: How Ideas Emerge (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0007542488/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0007542488&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) explains how all human systems and ideas evolve over time by a process not unlike natural evolution, including by natural selection. The economy, technologies, society, political systems, mores, and even religions all evolve this way. This is perhaps Matt Ridley's most important work as it summarizes all his ideas and theories and applies them to all every facet of human society.


http://www.eupedia.com/images/books/evolution_everything.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0007542488/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0007542488&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

Maciamo
08-04-16, 10:20
Another noteworthy science writer is Sam Kean. I have read his three books, which were all very well written and highly entertaining.

The Disappearing Spoon...and other true tales from the Periodic Table (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0552777501/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0552777501&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/disappearing_spoon.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0552777501/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0552777501&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)


The Tale of the Duelling Neurosurgeons: The History of the Human Brain as Revealed by True Stories of Trauma, Madness, and Recovery (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1784161039/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1784161039&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/duelling_neurosuregons.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1784161039/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1784161039&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)


The Violinist's Thumb: And other extraordinary true stories as written by our DNA (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/055277751X/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=055277751X&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/violonists_thumb.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/055277751X/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=055277751X&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

Maciamo
08-04-16, 11:22
I have also read most of Malcolm Gladwell's books. Not as compelling as Matt Ridley's books, but still well worth reading if you have time.

Outliers: The Story of Success (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141036257/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141036257&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/outliers.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141036257/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141036257&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)


Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141014598/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141014598&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/blink.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141014598/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141014598&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)


David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits and the Art of Battling Giants (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0241959594/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0241959594&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/david_goliath.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0241959594/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0241959594&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

Maciamo
08-04-16, 11:42
Three very, very good books that I warmly recommend.

Good Germs, Bad Germs: Health and Survival in A Bacterial World, by Jessica Snyder Sachs (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0809016427/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0809016427&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) deals with the human microbiome and the dangers of antibiotics. It's the best place to start reading for anyone interested in the symbiosis between humans and bacteria.

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/good_germs.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0809016427/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0809016427&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)


Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking, by Susan Cain (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141029196/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141029196&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) is one of the most uplifting psychology books I have read. Any quiet-loving introvert like me should read this book. Modern society often feels like a place designed for extroverts, but it doesn't have to be so.

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/quiet.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141029196/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141029196&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)


Stuff Matters: The Strange Stories of the Marvellous Materials that Shape Our Man-made World, by Mark Miodownik (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0241955181/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0241955181&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21), takes a look at some of the most useful materials in the recent history of mankind. Chapters cover metals, paper, concrete, chocolate, foam (e.g. aerogel), plastic, glass, graphite, and porcelain.

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/stuff_matters.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0241955181/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0241955181&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

Maciamo
23-06-17, 21:41
Three other great books.


A New Earth: Create a Better Life, by Eckhart Tolle (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141039418/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141039418&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) explains how the ego causes most of our suffering and how we can be happier by learning to recognise the ego and distancing ourselves from it. The author only has a very average grasp of history, linguistics and science, so there are factual mistakes, but that does not affect much the purpose of the book.

http://www.eupedia.com/images/books/New_Earth.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0141039418/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0141039418&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

Maciamo
24-06-17, 11:10
SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome, by Mary Beard (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1846683807/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1846683807&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) is a very well written history of Rome from foundation to 212 CE.


http://www.eupedia.com/images/books/SPQR.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1846683807/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1846683807&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)



Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, by Yuval Noah Harari (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1910701874/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1910701874&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) looks at the future of humanity, how new technologies and the demise of religions will reshape our values, lifestyle and what it means to be human.


http://www.eupedia.com/images/books/Homo_Deus.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1910701874/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1910701874&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, by Yuval Noah Harari (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0099590085/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0099590085&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) retraces the history of humankind in a very unique and enlightening fashion. One of the best history books in recent years.


http://www.eupedia.com/images/books/Sapiens.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0099590085/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=0099590085&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

Maciamo
07-08-17, 12:20
Biohistory: Decline and Fall of the West, by Jim Penman (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01GKH3ZK8/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=B01GKH3ZK8&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) argues that epigenetic changes caused by the way children are brought up are one of the main driving forces behind the rise and fall of civilisations. The author makes a convincing case that all civilisations suffer from historical cycles correlated with changes in temperament regarding basic values such as work and education. As civilisations get more prosperous, people become lazier, more hedonistic, less strict with children, which gradually leads to looser morals, less discipline, more leniency toward crime, and eventually the decline of the values on which that civilisation was built. The cycles of civilisations, be it in Europe, Japan, China, India or the Middle East, always last for about 300 to 400 years. According the Penman, Western countries, which each have slightly different cycles, peaking around the 19th century (early 19th for France, late 19th for Britain or Germany) and are already in the declining phase, which typically takes 150 to 200 years to reach the bottom.

I found this book thanks to the videos posted by Tomenable (http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/34051-Gene-culture-coevolution), which I encourage you to visualise first. The ideas in this book are certainly thought-provoking and I agree with most of it. The author makes one important mistake though in linking religion with increased C (Civilisation-building traits, such as hard work, small number of children, lots of time and energy devoted to children's education, etc.). It's really all the opposite. Very religious throughout history tended to have lots of children and not to value education as much as less religious people, hence the fall of the Roman Empire coinciding with the rise of Christianity, leading to a millennium of Dark Ages in Europe, which only abated with the rise of sciences and the Enlightenment.

http://www.eupedia.com/images/books/biohistory.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01GKH3ZK8/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=B01GKH3ZK8&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

Maciamo
07-08-17, 13:10
The Culture Map: Breaking Through the Invisible Boundaries of Global Business, by Erin Meyer (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1610392507/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1610392507&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21) is very interesting book on cultural differences between countries, which I warmly recommend.

http://www.eupedia.com/images/books/culture_map.jpg (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1610392507/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=6738&creativeASIN=1610392507&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-21)

The author is an American married to a Frenchman and a professor at INSEAD international business school in Paris. She builds on the work on famous cross-cultural psychologist Geert Hofstede (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geert_Hofstede), who I have mentioned several times on this forum. I used Hoftsede's cultural dimensions (https://geert-hofstede.com/national-culture.html) to make the map of individualism vs collectivism (http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/26956-Map-of-Individualism-(vs-Collectivism)). Erin Meyer proposes 8 cultural dimensions of her own.

1) Communicating: Low context (e.g. English-speaking countries) vs high context cultures (France, Russia, Asian countries)
Low context means that people of that culture assume that others think very differently from them and everything should be explained clearly and accurately to be understood. High context cultures use a lot of innuendos, second degrees, hidden messages and cultural references that won't easily be understood by outsiders.

2) Evaluating: direct negative feedback (e.g. France, Germany, Russia, Israel) vs indirect negative feedback (Asian, African and Latin American countries)

3) Persuading: principles-first (Italy, Spain, France, Russia) vs application-first (English-speaking countries) vs holistic approach (Asian countries)
Principles-first countries have a more theoretical approach, while application-first are more pragmatic and empirical. The holistic approach looks at the whole picture rather than the details.

4) Leading: egalitarian (Nordic countries, Netherlands, Israel, Australia) vs hierarchical (Asian, African and Latin countries)

5) Deciding: top-down (India, China, Russia, France, Italy, USA) vs consensual (Nordic countries, Netherlands, Japan)

6) Trusting: task-based (English-speaking and Germanic/Nordic countries) vs relationship-based (African, Asian and Latin countries)
Relationship-based countries need to build personal relationships before they can trust someone to do business. These cultures don't distinguish the private and professional spheres. Allegiances are first to people rather than companies or organisations.

7) Disagreeing: confrontational (Israel, Russia, and most European countries except Sweden and UK) vs avoids confrontation (East Asian countries and to a lower extent other Asian countries)

8) Scheduling: linear time (Japan, Germanic & English-speaking countries) vs flexible time (African and South Asian countries, China, and to a lower extent Russia, Turkey and Latin countries)

Linear time means that people have strictly organised schedules and punctuality is expected.
My "default mode" is closest to the British for almost every dimension. Regarding the persuading dimension, I grew up with the French/Belgian theoretical approach (education/nurture), but became much more pragmatic from my late teens as it fitted better my character (nature). However, I have always valued more the big picture than details, so in that dimension only I think I would fit better in the East Asian holistic approach. This is why I favour multidisciplinary approach to science too.

When I entered university, it was extremely hard for me to choose my major, as I wanted to study everything. We can only understand the world if we see every aspect of it, from different angles and at different levels. To understand history one mustn't just know about historical facts, but should also understand human psychology, how people relate with one another (sociology and anthropology), differences between cultures, which in turn are influences by languages. Understanding psychology requires a good grasp of how the brain works (neuroscience), but also of genetic variations that determine how individual brain (and other biological functions) can differ. One cannot attempt to understand the global economy without first learning about cultural differences, which are rooted in historical and genetic divergences. Everything is linked.

Maciamo
02-09-17, 14:17
Ancestral Journeys: The Peopling of Europe from the First Venturers to the Vikings, by Jean Manco (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0500292078/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0500292078&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0) is the best book I know of about historical population genetics and archeogenetics. It is the main reason I did not write a book of my own, as it would have been very similar to Jean's book, except that her writing style is superior to mine. The structure of the book is chronological and she introduces the main relevant concepts in the first two chapters, clearly and eloquently explaining how DNA can be used to retrace ancestry, or how archaeology and linguistics often can and should be combined with genomics to make sense of human prehistory and ancient migrations. She rightfully warns of the dangers of not confusing pots for people - although in the first version of the book she ironically falls in that trap with the Bell Beakers, assuming that there were one homogeneous ethnic group (which I was told was corrected in this second edition). Overall the book is very well structured, well researched, clear and coherent. It is an informative and comprehensive introduction to European population history that I think everyone on this forum should read. It's a great complement to my articles, which often require a basic knowledge of prehistory and population genetics to be understood, which this book aptly provides.

http://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=0500292078&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL160_&tag=eupedia-20 (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0500292078/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0500292078&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)

Maciamo
05-09-17, 12:57
History and archaeology buffs will be interested in these books.

The Making of the Bronze Age in Eurasia, by Philip L. Kohl (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/052184780X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=052184780X&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=672e72b761705f369ab0becec920d16d)

http://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=052184780X&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL160_&tag=eupedia-20 (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/052184780X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=052184780X&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=672e72b761705f369ab0becec920d16d)

A History of the Ancient Near East, ca. 3000-323 BC, by Marc Van De Mieroop (http://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=111871816X&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL160_&tag=eupedia-20)

http://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=111871816X&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL160_&tag=eupedia-20 (http://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=111871816X&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL160_&tag=eupedia-20)

Maciamo
20-04-18, 17:39
I am currently reading David Reich's book Who We Are and How We Got Here: Ancient DNA and the New Science of the Human Past (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/110187032X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=110187032X&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=b0f211b2cfe28526c03ca2330c262087)https://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=eupedia-20&l=am2&o=1&a=110187032X.

For the newbies who don't know him, David Reich is a professor of genetics at Harvard University whose lab pioneered the sequencing of large number of ancient DNA samples. He explains how he and his colleagues tested the whole genome of Neanderthals, discovered by chance a new type of archaic humans, the Denisovans (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denisovan), how much modern humans inherited from archaic humans and how ancient DNA revolutionised our understanding of prehistory, notably by showing that human races 5,000 to 10,000 years ago were radically different from today and that all modern populations are relatively recent blends. The book focuses mostly on how modern ethnic groups came into being and how ancient DNA made it possible to identify these 'ghost populations' from which we descend.

https://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=110187032X&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL250_&tag=eupedia-20 (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/110187032X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=110187032X&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=7b1ef7f940a502655b44ef0116ec9b9f)

Maciamo
23-05-18, 22:17
I have created a Libib library (https://maciamo.libib.com/) with all the books I have read (minus those I disliked). I did not include textbooks, travel guides or most fictions or works of literature.

ruskabajka
25-07-18, 15:06
though it is mostly seen as a kid`s book, I would recommend "Advantures of Til Eulenspiegel" (I am not sure about proper title of the book)....
It is well known in German world, and pretty much unknown outside of it

freemanhe1979
26-08-18, 20:18
So nice, thanks

Maciamo
02-02-19, 18:35
I have read seven books about ancient Rome over the past year.

The Fall of Rome: And the End of Civilization, by Bryan Ward-Perkins (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0192807285/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0192807285&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51SiTmgjyIL._SX332_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

24 Hours in Ancient Rome: A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There, by Philip Matyszak (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0758BFFFX/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B0758BFFFX&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51lmvbflyyL.jpg

The Dream of Rome by Boris Johnson, by Boris Johnson (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01K921PZM/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B01K921PZM&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51uSH2dZv4L._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Pax Romana: War, Peace and Conquest in the Roman World, by Adrian Goldsworthy (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0300178824/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0300178824&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51ZhcGacfeL._SX325_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

The Roman Republic: A Very Short Introduction, by David M. Gwynn (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0199595119/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0199595119&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51nvHrHFeML._SX320_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

I have read the following books in Italian:

Storia di Roma antica, by Giuseppe Antonelli (https://www.amazon.it/Storia-Roma-antica-eNewton-Sapere-ebook/dp/B00ANBTXP4/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1549128198&sr=1-1)
https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5161SCBnxsL.jpg

Una giornata nell'antica Roma. Vita quotidiana, segreti e curiosità, by Alberto Angela (https://www.amazon.it/gp/product/8804666684?pf_rd_p=92d57b9a-560a-4125-a16c-a71765b4ec43&pf_rd_r=QH2AC607NQJYJEGYPBWX)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51UGF9-kWOL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg


All of them were good, but The Fall of Rome was the least interesting for me, maybe because I already knew well that period and didn't learn much.

Boris Johnson's book was quite enjoyable because it was very funny, while at the same time being well-written and erudite.

But my favourite in the lot has to be the last one by Alberto Angela, which also exists in English (A Day in the Life of Ancient Rome (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1933372710/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1933372710&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)).

If you had to read only two books I would recommend these two. Unfortunately Boris Johnson's book isn't available on Kindle.

Angela
02-02-19, 19:05
I have read seven books about ancient Rome over the past year.

The Fall of Rome: And the End of Civilization, by Bryan Ward-Perkins (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0192807285/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0192807285&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51SiTmgjyIL._SX332_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

24 Hours in Ancient Rome: A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There, by Philip Matyszak (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0758BFFFX/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B0758BFFFX&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51lmvbflyyL.jpg

The Dream of Rome by Boris Johnson, by Boris Johnson (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01K921PZM/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B01K921PZM&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51uSH2dZv4L._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Pax Romana: War, Peace and Conquest in the Roman World, by Adrian Goldsworthy (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0300178824/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0300178824&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51ZhcGacfeL._SX325_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

The Roman Republic: A Very Short Introduction, by David M. Gwynn (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0199595119/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0199595119&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51nvHrHFeML._SX320_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

I have read the following books in Italian:

Storia di Roma antica, by Giuseppe Antonelli (https://www.amazon.it/Storia-Roma-antica-eNewton-Sapere-ebook/dp/B00ANBTXP4/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1549128198&sr=1-1)
https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5161SCBnxsL.jpg

Una giornata nell'antica Roma. Vita quotidiana, segreti e curiosità, by Alberto Angela (https://www.amazon.it/gp/product/8804666684?pf_rd_p=92d57b9a-560a-4125-a16c-a71765b4ec43&pf_rd_r=QH2AC607NQJYJEGYPBWX)
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51UGF9-kWOL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg


All of them were good, but The Fall of Rome was the least interesting for me, maybe because I already knew well that period and didn't learn much.

Boris Johnson's book was quite enjoyable because it was very funny, while at the same time being well-written and erudite.

But my favourite in the lot has to be the last one by Alberto Angela, which also exists in English (A Day in the Life of Ancient Rome (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1933372710/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1933372710&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=fd0c914c4627256ba39bb8f55c5a0ce0)).

If you had to read only two books I would recommend these two. Unfortunately Boris Johnson's book isn't available on Kindle.

I'm a big fan of Alberto Angela. He's one of the great popularizers.

For those not that familiar with him he's all over youtube in both Italian and English. Quite good clips.

Salento
02-02-19, 21:26
I also watched many shows/documentaries hosted by his father, Piero Angela.

Maciamo
03-02-19, 10:13
I'm a big fan of Alberto Angela. He's one of the great popularizers.


I have already started his next book Impero. Viaggio nell'Impero di Roma seguendo una moneta (https://www.amazon.it/Impero-Viaggio-nellImpero-seguendo-moneta/dp/8804666781/ref=pd_bxgy_14_img_2/257-0639723-0303634?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=8804666781&pd_rd_r=d8917362-2792-11e9-a467-b9749e8bfc1b&pd_rd_w=X61eH&pd_rd_wg=dB8xA&pf_rd_p=11c5cf40-39ef-4bbd-8511-b315eb9e9301&pf_rd_r=Y4KXR06T41MMZ5GRGHXC&psc=1&refRID=Y4KXR06T41MMZ5GRGHXC).

Reading is a great way to learn new words. I used to write down vocabulary on a piece of paper I kept in the book as a bookmark. But since I adopted Kindle I simply highlight words I want to remember in blue (yellow highlights is for noteworthy passages), then export the highlights to Google Drive and make a list on a spreadsheet with one column for the translation and another for the category of words, so that I can classify them easily in one click. I learned over 100 words with Una giornata nell'antica Roma.

Maciamo
06-02-19, 19:55
I checked the documentaries hosted by Alberto Angela on YouTube, but unfortunately the video quality is not very good. I'd rather recommend to create a free account on the Rai website and watch the videos in HD there. I like his documentary series Ulisse: il piacere della scoperta (https://www.raiplay.it/programmi/ulisseilpiaceredellascoperta/), which has been running for four seasons now. There are episodes about ancient Rome (hidden secrets under Rome, Augustus, Trajan, the Colosseum, the sexual life of ancient Romans...), but also about other historical periods (in all the world, not only Italy), about natural regions and even about DNA and about Neanderthal.

Angela
06-02-19, 21:31
I checked the documentaries hosted by Alberto Angela on YouTube, but unfortunately the video quality is not very good. I'd rather recommend to create a free account on the Rai website and watch the videos in HD there. I like his documentary series Ulisse: il piacere della scoperta (https://www.raiplay.it/programmi/ulisseilpiaceredellascoperta/), which has been running for four seasons now. There are episodes about ancient Rome (hidden secrets under Rome, Augustus, Trajan, the Colosseum, the sexual life of ancient Romans...), but also about other historical periods (in all the world, not only Italy), about natural regions and even about DNA and about Neanderthal.

Thanks, Maciamo.

I'll do that.

Maciamo
14-05-19, 10:55
Two other great books about ancient Rome, this time about the lives of Roman emperors. The first covers all the emperors as well as the evolution of Roman society and religious beliefs. The second concentrates on 10 emperors, but mentions also other major emperors, and only skips the period from 251 to 284 and after Constantine.

David Potter's book is more complete and succinct, although Barry Strauss's book may be slightly more enjoyable to read. Both are American university professors of ancient history (Potter at the University of Michigan and Strauss at Cornell).

The Emperors of Rome: The Story of Imperial Rome from Julius Caesar to the Last Emperor, by David Potter (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1780877501/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1780877501&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=435712f9df9187f6d9caf79cbca08bf2)

https://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=1780877501&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL250_&tag=eupedia-20


Ten Caesars: Roman Emperors from Augustus to Constantine, by Barry Strauss (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07GNRKJWT/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B07GNRKJWT&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=435712f9df9187f6d9caf79cbca08bf2)

https://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=145166883X&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL250_&tag=eupedia-20

Maciamo
18-05-19, 16:25
Another great read: The Roman Emperor Aurelian: Restorer of the World (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1473845696/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1473845696&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=38d1b7e65f4c7f308720975ddbc76ca8), by John F. White. The book isn't just about Aurelian, but also about Valerian, Gallienus, Claudius II, Tacitus, Probus, Carus, the Gallic emperors (Postumus, Tetricus) as well as Zenobia and Vaballathus of Palmyra. A very interesting period (253-284) that almost saw the collapse of the Roman empire. This period was not mentioned by Barry Strauss in Ten Caesars, so the two books complete each other.

https://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=1473845696&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL250_&tag=eupedia-20

LABERIA
18-05-19, 16:48
I checked the documentaries hosted by Alberto Angela on YouTube, but unfortunately the video quality is not very good. I'd rather recommend to create a free account on the Rai website and watch the videos in HD there. I like his documentary series Ulisse: il piacere della scoperta (https://www.raiplay.it/programmi/ulisseilpiaceredellascoperta/), which has been running for four seasons now. There are episodes about ancient Rome (hidden secrets under Rome, Augustus, Trajan, the Colosseum, the sexual life of ancient Romans...), but also about other historical periods (in all the world, not only Italy), about natural regions and even about DNA and about Neanderthal.

Yes, he is following the steps of his father, Piero Angela (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piero_Angela). An incredible personality of Italian television.

Maciamo
20-05-19, 10:55
A few other books about ancient Rome that I have started reading.

Cataclysm 90 BC: The forgotten war that almost destroyed Rome, by Philip Matyszak (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1848847890/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1848847890&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=94efd6f8344edb33e1e0e1f4b64f4e85) about the Social War in which Italian cities and tribes fought against the Roman Republic in order to lose their independence to become Roman (the only case in history of the opposite of an independence war!).

https://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=1848847890&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL250_&tag=eupedia-20


Legionary: The Roman Soldier's (Unofficial) Manual (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FNIXWEA/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B00FNIXWEA&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=1f84ea1675ca5035ea8a1d5e7054721a), also by Philip Matyszak.

https://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=B00FNIXWEA&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL250_&tag=eupedia-20


Roman Britain: A New History, by Guy de la Bédoyère (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0500291144/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0500291144&linkCode=as2&tag=eupedia-20&linkId=3d4e2aa9e413e641907f3f583bc9b826)

https://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&MarketPlace=US&ASIN=0500291144&ServiceVersion=20070822&ID=AsinImage&WS=1&Format=_SL250_&tag=eupedia-20