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Cambrius (The Red)
02-07-09, 00:55
Latest comprehensive study published by University College London on Portugal Y-Haplogroups. By Beleza, et al., 2006. Contributors: Universidade de Porto, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Oxford University.

The new statistics are:

R1b = 59.9%
R1a = 2%
I1 = 6.1%
I2 = 1.5%
E-M35 = 12.5%
J1 = 3.4%
J2 = 7.0%
G = 5.5%
K = 1.6%
Other = 0.5%

Maciamo
02-07-09, 11:14
Do you have a link to the study ? I need the number of people tested to include it to the existing data and calculate the new average.

For Portugal the main studies I have included so far are The Genetic Legacy of Religious Diversity and Intolerance: Paternal Lineages of Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula, by Adams et al. (http://www.cell.com/AJHG/abstract/S0002-9297(08)00592-2) (n=137) and Reduced genetic structure of the Iberian peninsula revealed by Y-chromosome analysis: implications for population demography, by Flores et al (http://hpgl.stanford.edu/publications/EJHG_2004_v12_p855.pdf) (n=109).

EDIT : is this the study ? Micro-Phylogeographic and Demographic History of Portuguese Male Lineages, Beleza et al. (http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118548798/abstract). If so it is indeed big (n=657)

I will try to update the Portugal Y-DNA data today.

N.B. : 6.1% is for I1 + I2b, not just I1 !

Cambrius (The Red)
02-07-09, 16:02
Do you have a link to the study ? I need the number of people tested to include it to the existing data and calculate the new average.
For Portugal the main studies I have included so far are The Genetic Legacy of Religious Diversity and Intolerance: Paternal Lineages of Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula, by Adams et al. (http://www.cell.com/AJHG/abstract/S0002-9297(08)00592-2) (n=137) and Reduced genetic structure of the Iberian peninsula revealed by Y-chromosome analysis: implications for population demography, by Flores et al (http://hpgl.stanford.edu/publications/EJHG_2004_v12_p855.pdf) (n=109).
EDIT : is this the study ? Micro-Phylogeographic and Demographic History of Portuguese Male Lineages, Beleza et al. (http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118548798/abstract). If so it is indeed big (n=657)
I will try to update the Portugal Y-DNA data today.
N.B. : 6.1% is for I1 + I2b, not just I1 !
I have a printed copy. I googled Beleza, et.al, Portugal, Genetics and a link to the full study comes. It is perhaps the most thorough, comprehensive Y-haplogroup work done on the Portuguese native population; a very impressive study.
I-haplogroups are I (xI1b) = 6.1% and I1b2 = 1.5%.

Cambrius (The Red)
02-07-09, 16:16
Do you have a link to the study ? I need the number of people tested to include it to the existing data and calculate the new average.

For Portugal the main studies I have included so far are The Genetic Legacy of Religious Diversity and Intolerance: Paternal Lineages of Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula, by Adams et al. (http://www.cell.com/AJHG/abstract/S0002-9297(08)00592-2) (n=137) and Reduced genetic structure of the Iberian peninsula revealed by Y-chromosome analysis: implications for population demography, by Flores et al (http://hpgl.stanford.edu/publications/EJHG_2004_v12_p855.pdf) (n=109).

EDIT : is this the study ? Micro-Phylogeographic and Demographic History of Portuguese Male Lineages, Beleza et al. (http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118548798/abstract). If so it is indeed big (n=657)

I will try to update the Portugal Y-DNA data today.

N.B. : 6.1% is for I1 + I2b, not just I1 !

Yes the last study you mentioned is what I referenced. It is more solid evidence that Portugal is essentially 3/4 Atlantic Celtic in heritage.

Cambrius (The Red)
02-07-09, 17:12
Do you have a link to the study ? I need the number of people tested to include it to the existing data and calculate the new average.

For Portugal the main studies I have included so far are The Genetic Legacy of Religious Diversity and Intolerance: Paternal Lineages of Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula, by Adams et al. (http://www.cell.com/AJHG/abstract/S0002-9297(08)00592-2) (n=137) and Reduced genetic structure of the Iberian peninsula revealed by Y-chromosome analysis: implications for population demography, by Flores et al (http://hpgl.stanford.edu/publications/EJHG_2004_v12_p855.pdf) (n=109).

EDIT : is this the study ? Micro-Phylogeographic and Demographic History of Portuguese Male Lineages, Beleza et al. (http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118548798/abstract). If so it is indeed big (n=657)

I will try to update the Portugal Y-DNA data today.

N.B. : 6.1% is for I1 + I2b, not just I1 !


Hi Maciamo:

I noticed the DNA changes for Portugal. However, your total for the I haplogroup (6.5%) is 1.1% less than the Beleza study. Any reason for that?

Cambrius (The Red)
02-07-09, 17:18
Beleza has R1b at 59.9% and R1a at 2% and total I at 7.6%.

Maciamo
02-07-09, 18:09
I-haplogroups are I (xI1b) = 6.1% and I1b2 = 1.5%.

I1b2 is the old name of I2a. I(xI1b) is I*, I1 and I2b. I doubt that there are any I* left nowadays, so it's basically just I1 and I2b.


I noticed the DNA changes for Portugal. However, your total for the I haplogroup (6.5%) is 1.1% less than the Beleza study. Any reason for that?

As I said above, I do not just replace old data by a single new study. I add it to the existing results. I have calculated the number of people identified for each haplogroup in each study. For example, in Beleza's study there were 394 R1b samples, which I added to the 129 samples I already had from the two afore-mentioned studies. I have recalculated the percentages for the total of the 3 studies.

Cambrius (The Red)
02-07-09, 18:24
I1b2 is the old name of I2a. I(xI1b) is I*, I1 and I2b. I doubt that there are any I* left nowadays, so it's basically just I1 and I2b.
As I said above, I do not just replace old data by a single new study. I add it to the existing results. I have calculated the number of people identified for each haplogroup in each study. For example, in Beleza's study there were 394 R1b samples, which I added to the 129 samples I already had from the two afore-mentioned studies. I have recalculated the percentages for the total of the 3 studies.

Ok, that makes sense. :good_job: