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View Full Version : Indo-europeans in North East Asia ? 2,000 year old male found



Wilhelm
04-02-10, 23:02
Abstract

We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNP), and autosomal short tandem repeats (STR) of three skeletons found in a 2,000-year-old Xiongnu elite cemetery in Duurlig Nars of Northeast Mongolia. This study is one of the first reports of the detailed genetic analysis of ancient human remains using the three types of genetic markers. The DNA analyses revealed that one subject was an ancient male skeleton with maternal U2e1 and paternal R1a1 haplogroups. This is the first genetic evidence that a male of distinctive Indo-European lineages (R1a1) was present in the Xiongnu of Mongolia. This might indicate an Indo-European migration into Northeast Asia 2,000 years ago. Other specimens are a female with mtDNA haplogroup D4 and a male with Y-SNP haplogroup C3 and mtDNA haplogroup D4. Those haplogroups are common in Northeast Asia. There was no close kinship among them. The genetic evidence of U2e1 and R1a1 may help to clarify the migration patterns of Indo-Europeans and ancient East-West contacts of the Xiongnu Empire.

Wiley InterScience :: Session Cookies (http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/123246661/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0)

Maciamo
05-02-10, 12:29
I don't think it's new. Similar results have been listed on Jean Manco's Ancient Eurasian DNA (http://www.buildinghistory.org/distantpast/ancientdna.shtml) list for months. There are many others, and many older ones too. The Indo-Europeans expanded very far away, all the way to Portugal, Ireland, Siberia and southern India. The Tarim mummies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarim_mummies)from North-West China are undoubtedly Indo-European and the oldest is 4000 years old.

willy
18-03-10, 03:56
I don't think it's new. Similar results have been listed on Jean Manco's Ancient Eurasian DNA (http://www.buildinghistory.org/distantpast/ancientdna.shtml) list for months. There are many others, and many older ones too. The Indo-Europeans expanded very far away, all the way to Portugal, Ireland, Siberia and southern India. The Tarim mummies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarim_mummies)from North-West China are undoubtedly Indo-European and the oldest is 4000 years old.

What haplogroup ? on Portugal or Ireland ? R1b1b2 Atlantic haplogoup Neolithic Europeans farmers from Anatolia this is ok with real research not opinion or speculations . "Indo european" is not a race or a haplogroup this is a LANGAGE !

R. Beiter
17-05-10, 14:07
Willy : "this is ok with real research not opinion or speculations"

It's not speculations.
Archeology, linguistics and now even genetics seem to support the Kurgan hypothesis so far.

Here's a few informations. I knew a few things about the Tarim Mummies before but I learnt a few surprising facts there. The sources seem legit and even "mainstream" as far as I can see.

"Indo european" is not a race or a haplogroup this is a LANGAGE ! "

Yes, but obviously it was once spoken by one particular people, unless you claim that a family language could have appeared spontaneously from east India up to Iceland, sharing post-neolithic terms for metal, wheel and horse...

R. Beiter
17-05-10, 14:10
Oops, I forgot the link and apparently I can't edit for some reason....

Willy : "this is ok with real research not opinion or speculations"

It's not speculations.
Archeology, linguistics and now even genetics seem to support the Kurgan hypothesis so far.

Here's a few informations. I knew a few things about the Tarim Mummies before but I learnt a few surprising facts there. The sources seem legit and even "mainstream" as far as I can see.

pastmists wordpress com/2010/05/12/xinjiang/

Put the h t t p : and . where required.