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Chris
14-05-10, 21:14
Does anyone know a comprehensive source of the origins of English surnames? I'm trying to discover a reliable source for my surname (Maude). I have a 67 marker result for my Y DNA and it would be interesting to correlate it to the surname information.

watta
26-05-10, 20:01
is it realy english? it seems to be rather french ... have you read steve jones: the descent of man? it give some interesting answers about spreading surnames in Britain, event it´s a bit older (2003). but - if you are searching for a table with names compared to groups - it doesn´t exist.

Chris
26-05-10, 20:31
is it realy english? it seems to be rather french ...

It sure is, albeit as you say, French-looking. Check this site out - very interesting: http://www.publicprofiler.org/worldnames/Main.aspx

OldWil
04-06-10, 19:36
Chris,

My earliest know ancestor was born in Dorset, UK about 1595. My surname is Danish (Husted) but my Y-DNA is I2a1b. I suspect that my earlier ancestors reached the British Isles soon after the end of the last glacial maximum and obtained the Husted surname from a Danish master or employer, maybe in the 14th-15th centuries. I guess this surname could be considered English.

Wil Husted

elly
13-08-10, 19:21
My surname is Elliot and I'm R-L2*; does anyone have a hunch of how an Elliot came to be this?

Kyle Elliot

Aristander
14-08-10, 01:47
My surname is Elliot and I'm R-L2*; does anyone have a hunch of how an Elliot came to be this?

Kyle Elliot

Isn't that group found mainly in southern Asia? Maybe you had an East Indian ancestor several centuries ago? The British have been in contact with India for nearly 400 years. A lot of gene transfer can happen in that time. I don't know what groups the Roma are but they are of Indian/Asian origins. I remember reading a couple of years back about Roma DNA being found in an Anglo-Saxon skeleton somewhere in Britain.

elly
14-08-10, 06:53
R-L2* is U152+, L2+.

Legiter1
29-06-19, 04:27
What about the surname Phillips? I know that it is of English origin, but I am not sure where my original ancestors or their surname was from.

29-06-19, 23:42
The problem with surnames is they often change over time, especially during periods of high illiteracy, and this obscures their origins. My surname is Hissem, a very rare name that I assumed was German, like Heisman or Hesse. However, after years of research I’ve discovered, through both DNA and paper research, that my paternal line is English.

It turns out the name began as Heysham, from a village in Lancashire. During the 1680’s the village’s name was rendered as Heesom (I’ve found over 50 variations of the spelling) and that’s how it was written when first found in America. Time, and ignorance, altered the name further while the family forgot its history.

So, I wouldn’t place too much faith in what nationality a name sounds like.

29-06-19, 23:52
There are many sites which propose origins of surnames, but I expect most are just guesses. I believe there were Mauds and Maws recorded in England in the 13th century. Have you researched these?

Joey37
30-06-19, 00:15
My father (and uncles') surname at birth was Sellers, so I always thought we were English (I still am genetically English, as my mother is 3/4 English) but my grandmother told me that no, the family is German in origin. My male line great-great-great-grandfather was Peter Seller, born in the Palatinate on June 29, 1838 (today would be his 181st birthday), and the last name is a dialectical version of the standard German Seiler, which means a person who made rope.

paul333
30-06-19, 00:26
Does anyone know a comprehensive source of the origins of English surnames? I'm trying to discover a reliable source for my surname (Maude). I have a 67 marker result for my Y DNA and it would be interesting to correlate it to the surname information.


There is a penguin edition of Basil Cottle Dictionary of Surnames ,1967/1978 mainly for the British Isle, it gives Maude as a 'F' First name derivative, and also the family name of vicounts of Harwarden. from Matilda/Maude.

Otherwise I think P H Reaney The origin of English Surnames 1967. both should give you enough reliable information.

30-06-19, 00:36
My father (and uncles') surname at birth was Sellers, so I always thought we were English (I still am genetically English, as my mother is 3/4 English) but my grandmother told me that no, the family is German in origin. My male line great-great-great-grandfather was Peter Seller, born in the Palatinate on June 29, 1838 (today would be his 181st birthday), and the last name is a dialectical version of the standard German Seiler, which means a person who made rope.

My maternal grandmother is a Dengler. While I wondered if this could be a name based on a trade, I couldn’t imagine dengling and making a living at it. However a German man told me that the appropriate trade was denglen, that is a blade sharpener.

paul333
30-06-19, 00:51
My surname is Elliot and I'm R-L2*; does anyone have a hunch of how an Elliot came to be this?

Kyle Elliot


Elliot is a surname associated with the Border Reivers, in and around the Scotish/English border,. One theory regarding associating your Y DNA origin is that it could be a survival from the Roman occupation of Hadrians Wall, or Northern Britain.

Have a look on the FTDNA Border Reivers site there are some Elliots with Y DNA 'R' subclades.

paul333
30-06-19, 01:12
Elliot is a surname associated with the Border Reivers, in and around the Scotish/English border,. One theory regarding associating your Y DNA origin is that it could be a survival from the Roman occupation of Hadrians Wall, or Northern Britain.

Have a look on the FTDNA Border Reivers site there are some Elliots with Y DNA 'R' subclades.


Just become aware the the original posts were from 2010.

30-06-19, 01:19
I have explored the same Roman linkage, via Wall/Lancashire . . . But as G2a, looking at Austria
/Southern Germany as closest continental link. Celts or Raetians?

Where do you think the Elliot’s come from?

paul333
30-06-19, 23:34
I have explored the same Roman linkage, via Wall/Lancashire . . . But as G2a, looking at Austria
/Southern Germany as closest continental link. Celts or Raetians?

Where do you think the Elliot’s come from?

No Idea, but people associated with that surname were living among the Border Reivers, who are known to of been around since the 13th century in the Border regions.

They could of been there anciently, or came with the roman occupations, as Traders, Soldiers, or Auxillary troops from further afield etc, or Even Anglo Saxon, or Viking, settlers, it will be hard to say.

They could well be English or Scottish, or other, but it will be difficult to confirm which, as many of their records may not exist.

Its thought a lot of Scotsmen were moved from higher up Scotland,as a result of the highland clearances, and failed rebellions, fleeing, or being forced or sent away, some to Ireland, and other countries, many to Canada, some even as slaves to the West Indies, etc, These area's had to be settled, and it was in part a reason for this.

Many of these are believed to of secretly returned, but had to hide their clan names etc,and settle in other area's such as the Scottish Lowlands, and Border regions, due to their speech, and accents etc and they would not seem too out of place in the Border regions. As a result its believed they took traditional surnames of the region, in order to hide their true ancestry. Possibly some Elliot's etc were among these, but it will only be DNA that will prove this theory.

My mothers paternal family came originally from Northern Northumberland, and we are familiar with the history of the border area, and the Reivers. People from this area had a very strong and unique Northumbrian dialect, and it was famous for rolling the 'R' sounds, etc and My G/Grandfather spoke with this very distinct sound/accent.