PDA

View Full Version : Environmental DNA modifications tied to obesity



Aristander
17-09-10, 20:54
From ScienceNews
Epigenetic changes could influence many common conditions. (http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/63405/title/Environmental_DNA_modifications_tied_to_obesity)

Now I have another excuse for being 30 kilos overweight! :grin:

Carlitos
19-09-10, 01:09
:useless:

:embarassed::embarassed::embarassed::embarassed:

:good_job:

himagain
31-01-12, 21:50
A surgeon told me last month that it seems a new virus that causes obesity mutated in existence in the 1980s.
He is a Bariatric surgeon, so I suspect he may be well informed. Has anyone here
heard this information?

LeBrok
01-02-12, 02:00
Nope, seams like a conspiracy. If it was discovered that virus causes obesity, the news would be loudest since A bomb.
100 times more money would be flowing to it than to AIDS research. Obesity vaccine would be a holly grail of diet, and trillion dollar business.
I've never heard that virus can cause obesity, at least in general population. Possibly he was referring to extreme cases, were virus attacks an organ which produces hormones that regulate appetite, therefore in these causes some people gain weight because of a virus.

hope
27-02-12, 03:27
I do not think that likely as it seems, on a whole, obesity is much more common in countries where food is readily available whereas third world countries suffer from little obesity. Therefore that "fat" gene would be pretty much located within those populations of easily attainable food, which seems somewhat random. While there may be a tendency in some people to be large I think it wishful thinking the rest of the population can blame it on anything other than simple greed.

Alexandros
12-05-13, 13:44
The polymorphisms predisposing to obesity (mainly FTO and MC4R genes) are found allover the world and are not concentrated in specific populations. In general, obesity is much more of an environmental condition rather than genetic, apart from a few extreme cases of monogenic forms. Apart from those, it's all about gene-environment interactions.

Cambrius (The Red)
02-06-13, 17:09
There are people who have dominant "fat genes", for certain.