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Melusine
25-01-11, 02:39
Hi to all,

I'm not sure that I'm posting this topic in the right place, however, I have seen so many maps and more maps that I sometimes feel as this is a cartography thread instead of genetics.

Has anyone who has tested their y-dna also worked /researched their paternal genealogy?

I, am female, so one of my brother did the y-dna test for our paternal line (father deceased).

I am also an avid family (for fun only) genealogist.

As I've mentioned on a previous post we are haplogroup G.

My brother has upgraded his markers to 67 and has also particapated in a y-dna project called. Walk Through The Y (Whit Athey et al).

My paternal line has been in the USA for a little over 300 years and I have a complete generation to generation papertrial line of descent to France, where I "brickwall", with my last known and well documented ancestor who was born circa 1560.

I have "other" genealogical information as to who this last known ancestor's father may have been, he was either the son of a "certain known male" , or his paternal cousin's son (Y-dna same).

However, my brother has 3 matches at 67 markers (with mutations), all share the same known surname (or varient) and according to a person who has a very good background in arriving at a probable Most Recent Common Ancestor, it is estimated that we all share a MRCA circa about 1100 c.e.

According to my research, my paternal line ancestor living circa 1100 in France had son's, and only the eldest (my line) could carry the titled name of the family. The younger son's "ate cake" or if very lucky married wealthy heiresses.

The 3 men that match us, no doubt, all descend (they all match each other closely) from one of the younger sons who went to England or UK (that is where they all have known ancestry), right after the conquest (1066) according to documentation. One of the younger sons descendants took his first name as their last name, and these three men, all share this same surname, and y-dna . One male has his last known ancestor here in the USA circa 1665. One man lives in England and his family never came to America. The other man lives in Scotland and he also has no known family in the USA.

Even though we have a papertrail gap of about 400 years plus, via y-dna testing and the information that we have researched confirms that we all descend from the same male ancestor living circa 1100 c.e. plus or minus. Since, I do have records of the family that we descend from on the straight paternal line, this collaborates the papertrail and y-dna cousinship.

BTW: none of us knew of each other until y-dna testing about 5 years ago.

Does anyone here on this forum have a genetic genealogy story to tell?

Also, keep in mind that no country is " genetically monolithic", peoples from all over the world (European in this case) have not only relocated, married or have migrated all over Europe. To, label any "group" as all coming from only one y-dna paternal or mtdna line is "simplistic" reckoning . We are all parts of a "whole".

Country bounderies are made by man not genetics. Genetics plays a role in the forming and parting of "so named/called countries.


Melusine

iapodos
25-01-11, 10:27
Interesting story. Melusine.

I also done 67 test and it appears that I have no close matches on 67. There is one match (-4) on 37 and one on 25(-2). Match with man on 25 was quite surprising for me since I am I2a2 Dinaric South and the person I match is American with clear Scotish ancestry (his ancestors is in America for roughly 300 years). I2a2 Dinaric is practicaly absent in Western Europe so it is surprising. Other match(on 37) was also with American of German ancestry which was not so surprising because I2a2 Dinaric is widespread in Germany.
I expected though that I will match with more Serbs, Croats since my family is of Serbian background.
The earliest written document I found on my geneaology is from 17. century and it shows presence of the family as one of many frontiersmen family in the Venetian Dalmatia which were fighting against Turks. There is a family tradition of migration of those families from the region of Herzegovina to Dalmatia in the late middle ages after fall of Serbian medieval state. My genetic results fit into this story since the Herzegovina is over 70 % I2a2 Dinaric South and the first region where Serbs were settled after they came on Balkan. It would be helpful if I have some more close matches in the future, but some haplotypes are simply rarer than others.

CDriver
26-01-11, 23:50
Great research Melusine,

My paternal line migrated to Isle of Wight, Virginia in 1656 from Gloucestershire, England. February of 2010 I had a Y-DNA test through Genebase and turns out I am R1b L21+. I am negative for S21, M222, M153, and P66. Most of my close matches report Scot ancestry. This is confusing since my surname is Driver. DNA doesn't lie so there has got to be an interesting story yet to be discovered. Genealogy and genetics are quite fasinating.

CDriver
26-01-11, 23:55
Oops, looks like I dropped a 'c' in fascinating.

Chris
30-01-11, 16:57
Also, keep in mind that no country is " genetically monolithic", peoples from all over the world (European in this case) have not only relocated, married or have migrated all over Europe. To, label any "group" as all coming from only one y-dna paternal or mtdna line is "simplistic" reckoning . We are all parts of a "whole".

Country bounderies are made by man not genetics. Genetics plays a role in the forming and parting of "so named/called countries.


Melusine

Yes and no. Monolithic? No. Racial purity advocates have no idea what reality is about when it comes to genetics.

Predominantly certain types in a region/country? Yes. How much so depends on how old a country is and whether it has been relatively isolated or a crossroads, e.g. Sicily.

RaHoWa
21-10-12, 16:33
Great research Melusine,

My paternal line migrated to Isle of Wight, Virginia in 1656 from Gloucestershire, England. February of 2010 I had a Y-DNA test through Genebase and turns out I am R1b L21+. I am negative for S21, M222, M153, and P66. Most of my close matches report Scot ancestry. This is confusing since my surname is Driver. DNA doesn't lie so there has got to be an interesting story yet to be discovered. Genealogy and genetics are quite fasinating.
I am from Tennessee and I also have the L21 Y-dna and my results were negative for M222 and they also matched for Scottish ancestry.I was confused also but after further testing it showed my Y-dna type is a British Celtic type that was common to the western Lowlands of Scotland around Glasgow,Ayrshire,and Dumbartonshire.I found the Scots who went to Northern Ireland to become the Scotch-Irish had origins mostly in the western Scottish Lowlands and Borders.In those areas many Welsh-speaking Celts and British Celts lived before the Gaelic Celts or the M222 type came to Scotland.My ynda is from th Scotch-Irish background and it matched for Scottish ancestry but not for M222 or Welsh and English,If you are negative for M222 but yet you match strongly for Scotland then chances are your L21 type is either a Pictish type which is L21-str47 or British Celtic type that is common in the Scottish Lowlands,If you are from Mississippi then you are bound to have at least some Scotch-Irish ancestry as well as English.SO maybe it could be from that,you should look at Walk the Y at family tree dna for L21 or look at Scotland's DNA,a testing company that specializes in British Isle genes and it used to be called EthnoAncestry.My family has roots in southern England also mainly around Bristol and Somerset.Most Native Southerners have English roots in southern and south/west England and at least some degree of Scotch-Irish ancestry from Northern Ireland and the Anglo-Scottish Border region.plus places like Gloucestershire and all of south west England have an Anglo-Celtic history.Its called the West Country,so your L21 type could be a Welsh type or something similar to that if your family came from Gloucestershire. your surname has nothing to do with your Y-dna results,Meaning you dont HAVE to have a Celtic sounding surname to have Scottish dna.My surname is Brown but I have Scottish L21 Y-dna.Names like Driver can be just as common in Scotland as in England or anywhere else,especially the Scottish Lowlands

RaHoWa
21-10-12, 16:38
Great research Melusine,

My paternal line migrated to Isle of Wight, Virginia in 1656 from Gloucestershire, England. February of 2010 I had a Y-DNA test through Genebase and turns out I am R1b L21+. I am negative for S21, M222, M153, and P66. Most of my close matches report Scot ancestry. This is confusing since my surname is Driver. DNA doesn't lie so there has got to be an interesting story yet to be discovered. Genealogy and genetics are quite fasinating.
Your surname has nothing to do with it unles it's rare.Names like Driver are just as common in the Scottish Lowlands as in England.My last name is Brown but I have a Scottish L21 Y-dna type.

Butler
21-10-12, 16:53
Surnames are a relatively recent development; people often adopted the name of the local clan or Lord to integrate themselves into the local community. The surname is a good guide forrecent research but going back into the 1500’s a surname for the common man may simply not exsist. The early surnames were ether occupational, Smith, Miller ,Sadler or associated with a place name.

zanipolo
27-10-12, 05:14
a polish geneologist produced this interesting map from eupedia data - it only indicates y-dna groups IF they exceed 35%

Click here to view the original image of 723x723px.
http://i1076.photobucket.com/albums/w443/priwas/Y-dnaBalanowsky.jpg