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Sirius2b
23-02-11, 02:21
I think that many of us had the experience that some books that you read, specially during your childhood or youth were very memorable or had a significant impact on you.

Could you mention some of them?

I personally was still in primary school when I was cautivated by the novels of the French author, Jules Verne...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jules_Verne

I specially mention:

Around the World in 80 days.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Around_the_World_in_Eighty_Days

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twenty_Thousand_Leagues_Under_the_Sea

From the Earth to the Moon.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/From_the_Earth_to_the_Moon


Later, in Secondary School (= High School) I was trapped again by the novels of Hermann Hesse...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermann_Hesse

Specially to mention:

Der Steppenwolf.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steppenwolf_(novel)

Untem Rad
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beneath_the_Wheel

Narziss und Goldmund
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narcissus_and_Goldmund

Das Glasperlenspiel.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Glass_Bead_Game

... I have no problem in answer that "Glassperlenspiel" is for me the best novel of the 20th century.

+++++++++++++++++

I feel that my early mentality was also shaped by these two British authors and their novels

Rudyard Kipling: "The Jungle Book".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudyard_Kipling
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Jungle_Book

Olaf Stapledon: "Sirius"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olaf_Stapledon

+++++++++++

Collectively, these books made me the man I currently am. :wary2:

(Naturally, I have read other books from some other authors, which were not Europeans... but I don't mention them here).

What about yourself?

Carlitos
23-02-11, 03:21
I started with The Five, Agatha Christie, then I remember a stolen white elephant, the prince among many others, but Story of O, Lady Chatterley's Lover, I Claudius, Claudius the God and his wife Messalina, Don Quijote de La Mancha, The Art of Love, Crime and punishment, one of my favorite books, The Family of Pascual Duarte, Eloisa is under an almond tree, Aunt Tula and a myriad of wonderful books, now I'm rereading Les Miserables, I floor fans to the author, let books come to me.

Sirius2b
23-02-11, 05:48
I started with The Five, Agatha Christie, then I remember a stolen white elephant, the prince among many others, but Story of O, Lady Chatterley's Lover, I Claudius, Claudius the God and his wife Messalina, Don Quijote de La Mancha, The Art of Love, Crime and punishment, one of my favorite books, The Family of Pascual Duarte, Eloisa is under an almond tree, Aunt Tula and a myriad of wonderful books, now I'm rereading Les Miserables, I floor fans to the author, let books come to me.

My father was an asiduous reader of Agatha Christie... but I never.

"Lady Chatterley's Lover" (D.H. Lawrence) was a revelation to me. I think that it showed much more than mere passages of eroticism, but also some strong social critique.

Now, regarding fine eroticism, I recomend the books of the Cuban-Spanish-French writer Anaïs Nin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ana%C3%AFs_Nin)(e.g. Delta of Venus).

"The Art of Love" (Erich Fromm) have been in my shelves for decades, and I have not decided to read it yet, I don't know why. I however, appreciated the book of Fernando Savater "Etica para Amador (http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tica_para_Amador)".

"Don Quijote de la Mancha" I read no more than 5 years ago. Of course, I read a version in "castellano moderno" - de hecho, latinoamericanizado hasta cierto punto. What impressed me most, was the kind of modern style in the prose (not result of the "translation").

The Biography of Miguel de Cervantes is also very impressive. The most fabulous thing, is that he spent I don't remember if 20 years of his life imprissoned, and he was able to create that extraordinary novel. In fact, he ended definitively the "Middle Ages" in literature, ending the "chivalry genere (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knight-errant)", an aim that was proposed by the author himself conciously, from the very beginning.

I have to read it again to fully appreciate some detail.

Regards.

Carlitos
23-02-11, 17:26
Agatha Christie books I forced myself to read them, do not know why, but it is, only the titles and shook me, such as The twisted House, mentally repeat the title made me shudder. I tried to read a book by Anais Nin, but I could not continue reading, perhaps a code too feminine, as I did with Virginia Woolf, I read the book Waves and I heard nothing. No doubt the life of Miguel de Cervantes is writing a book.

Melusine
23-02-11, 22:34
Books by Britiish writer, Seven Runciman. A History of the Crusades volumes I, II, and III. And his "other, books.

Melusine

Glückspilz
23-02-11, 23:11
hmm, we had to read lots of stuff at school (in german and english) like the catcher in the rye, die Nibelungen, Goethes Faust, Romeo and Julia, the jungle book, girl against the jungle, Herman Hesse... I also love Agatha Christie and stuff from Charles Bukowski. My favourite book however is written by an American, the physician (german title: Der Medicus) from Noah Gordon.

Glückspilz
23-02-11, 23:19
..and not to forget.. Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry :)

Carlitos
24-02-11, 01:27
Chronicle of a Death Foretold, was also a reading of adolescence that I left a trace, also East of Eden also another of my favorite books and The Hive, tremendously impressive.

Melusine
24-02-11, 02:47
Re: The Little Prince.

Years ago I found a used book and inside it there was this discription of Antoine de Saint-Exupery: (don't have date of article).

From Readers digest;

The Most Unfogettable Character I've Met by Lewis Galantiere pg 174).


On a penthouse terrace overlooking Central Park in New York in the summer of 1942. Our host was Antoine de Saint-Exupery airline pilot and author. His very looks were unforgettable, he stood six feet one (tall). He had a round close cropped head, bull neck , barrel chest , slim waist. His large protuberant eyes set almost sidewasy in his head, he looked the bird-man he was.

From front of English translation of the Little Prince there is this drawing and words:

"I believe that for his escape he took advantage of the migraton of a flock of wild birds"

( a drawing with a boy holding multipule strings with birds attached ,instead of balloons lifting the Little Prince aloft.

Melusine

Sirius2b
25-02-11, 17:00
My favourite book however is written by an American, the physician (german title: Der Medicus) from Noah Gordon.

The name Noha Gordon looked familiar, and I checked...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noah_Gordon_(novelist)

I read a shortened version of "The last Jew" some years ago.

I liked the novel.

Sirius2b
28-02-11, 00:09
Well, now that not European authors have already been mentioned, I guess none will be hurt...

La Investigación Cientifica (Philosophy of Science ), by Mario Bunge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mario_Bunge)

An extraordinary book about the Philosophy of Science and how it differs from Pseudoscience, Dogma or Religion. An extraordinary book, however little know even in Spanish-speaking countries.

Really, a book that make me proud of being Latin American. According to me, never has been explained the concept of "Science" in a so clear and profound way, and a how can it work together with Philosophy in a productive way for both realms.


++++++++++++

Gödel, Escher, Bach... an Eternal Golden Braid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6del,_Escher,_Bach), by Douglas Hofstandter.

A book full of intuitions about the concepts of "Intelligence" and "Logic". Many people have failed (according to the author) to grasp the real meaning and the profound intuitions of this book. So I will not try myself to describe it.

The MIT even created a course "Gödel, Escher, Bach"... I guess mostly attended by students of Artificial Intelligence, and here we have an introduction of the course in YouTube, for those interested.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jFhq3Rj6DI (1/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbgSJuFhv9U (2/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zj6hP8Ge4zs (3/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSh0XY67CE4 (4/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEKGwl2PBZU (5/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sx_80v0-8JU (6/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbOyGFphnTE (7/7)

(trully fascinating!!)

Another book - together with Philosophy of Science - that probably will be legacies to coming centuries.

Regards.

P.S.

Sorry, couldn't stop seeing this course of GEB.... so I share the third class here... (I know that some of you will like it so much, and for others will be just a bit extra text... so no big deal).

Third Class of the MIT course "GEB"...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxhft2RY8t4 (1/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxlx5Vy0UUU (2/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIMswd72ezE&NR=1 (3/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOPIWgpkP-8&NR=1 (4/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlwig7xSHO4 (5/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKMpLATioWA (6/7)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qd6xEjOf484&NR=1 (7/7)

Sirius2b
01-03-11, 00:03
An interesting interview to Mario Bunge...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPmCiFSUvQk (Spanish)

Angela
01-03-11, 20:44
I love poetry, so...the works of Montale, Lorca and Pablo Neruda.

Carlitos
02-03-11, 00:53
I love poetry, so...the works of Montale, Lorca and Pablo Neruda.

Lorca a legend in Spain, I also love Juan Ramón Jiménez, Benedetti and Gioconda Belli.

Sirius2b
03-03-11, 00:57
Benedetti was Uruguayan...

Pablo Neruda was Chilean ;)

Carlitos
03-03-11, 01:07
Benedetti was Uruguayan...

Pablo Neruda was Chilean ;)


Nobody is perfect. :laughing:

Angela
05-03-11, 18:14
Neruda is an honorary Italian in my book!:grin:

Reinaert
06-03-11, 14:07
Well.. One of the best writers:

Ortega Y Gasset

http://www.historyguide.org/europe/lecture9.html#gasset

http://www.historyguide.org/europe/gasset.html

crudshoveller
06-03-11, 19:40
I do have a long list of books that have meant something to me or that I adjudge to have played some role in developing interests I later explored more deeply. I don't think this tiresome list would have much relevance for anyone else.
A few items from my early literary awakening I will risk sharing: Gilbert Frankau's poem 'How Rifleman Brown Came to Valhalla'; 'The Ghost Ship' by Richard Middleton; 'Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1940'; 'The Golden Wonder Book for Children'.
An honourable mention must go to two books from the oversize section of my one-time local public library - I borrowed them many times - 'ffoulkes Fanfare' and Charles Adams' 'Monster Rally'. Another flagged item was 'The British Museum Is Falling Down'.
In my early years on the planet I also discovered in that same library a slim limited edition volume 'Verses of a Fighter Pilot'. This was a collection of F/O Archie Weir's poems collected and published by his mother after he was shot down and killed fighting the facist menace on behalf of all humanity in November 1940. I borrowed this book many times until it was removed from stock. Through the inter-library loan system a seach was made and a copy was located at Mansfield library, and from time to time I continued to requested the loan of this distant copy. Years later I unexpectedly came across the title in the catalogue of a New York aviation bookseller and I bought it.
I will now cease my ramblings to avoid the trap of self-indulgent nostalgiaizing.

Reinaert
06-03-11, 21:19
Well.. Another good book is..

Fromm, E. (1942) The Fear of Freedom

http://www.infed.org/thinkers/fromm.htm

Erich Fromm was born in Germany, but escaped the Nazi regime to the USA.
Great thinker and writer.

SiriusSocketPuppet_2
24-03-11, 18:20
Now that @Reineart mention E. Fromm... I want also mention Thomas Mann... one of those Authors that flee from the Nazis...

Books like the "The Magic Mountain" and "Dr. Faustus"... really are examples of those books that I think only could have been produced in the turbulent first part of the XX Century...

(Unfortunately I have only read them "piecewise"... :embarassed:... but one day I will give myself time to read them from begininng to end.)

An interesting documentary about the Exile of Thomas Mann...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5TMUdoIMK0

*

Riccardo
24-03-11, 20:10
Friedrich Nietzsche!

adamski
01-09-11, 10:09
Jane Austen - purely epic and highly addictive. A modern female Shakespeare. Pride and Prejudice is one of my most favorite books followed by her Emma... I love the understated heroic protagonist that is so affirmative and aware of herself at any given point of time. Elizabeth and Mr Darcy follow my famous couple competition taking first runner up right after Romeo and Juliet and their tragic love story of a love that was meant to be but not accepted :(

Cimmerianbloke
13-11-11, 06:15
Jules Verne is definitely something (or was, you'd find it boring if you were born in this digital age...), and le Petit Prince is one of these timeless yarns. I am surprised nobody named Charles Dickens. I used to read a lot of Arturo Perez-Reverte, his Alatriste is as good as the columns he used to write in El País. Tartarin de Tarascon from Daudet has a special place on my shelves, as Flaubert's Salambo has, and a lot of the European myths (Irish, germanic, scandinavian,...) as well as lots of folktale books from all corners of the continent. The only living European author I still read is belgian writer Amelie Nothomb, her mastery and usage of the french language has no equal.

himagain
21-01-12, 21:03
Not to disparage any of the many other great European authors I've read, but Jules Verne had a big early influence on me. I was also struck deeply by Hasek.

Michel Gilson
09-05-13, 18:59
Charles Dickens A Tale of Two Cities. Sydney Carton is a character I can relate to,(a man with great potential who never quite realizes it in life).I pray my end is as noble as his.

American Idiot
25-11-13, 13:02
Friedrich Nietzsche!


I also like Neitzsche alot and Machiavelli too.

2 of my other favorites (books) are "Les Miserables" and "Beowulf".....both very sad.

and of course, Bram Stoker's "Dracula" and Mary Shelly's "Frankenstein's Monster"


but isn't it weird how Mein Kampf by Hitler is the best seller of all time second only to the Bible?

adamo
25-11-13, 13:34
Les miserables takes an S big guy, its a silent S and ’les’ sounds somewaht like ´lay’ in english grammar.

Dutch Michael Gilson
20-10-16, 23:04
Martin Luther Commentary on Galatians, John Calvin The Institutes, John Bunyan The Pilgrim's Progress, John Foxe Acts and Monuments,Plato The Republic, Charles Dickens A Tale of Two Cities.

lukah.izreal
07-11-19, 17:47
I also like Neitzsche alot and Machiavelli too.

2 of my other favorites (books) are "Les Miserables" and "Beowulf".....both very sad.

and of course, Bram Stoker's "Dracula" and Mary Shelly's "Frankenstein's Monster"


but isn't it weird how Mein Kampf by Hitler is the best seller of all time second only to the Bible?
Yeah, those guys are really good! Also like horrors ) especially good ones )

07-11-19, 18:31
I could never get into poetry, but looking at my Kindle I can see that I frequently reread Pride & Prejudice, Wouk's Winds of War (I guess an American fits as a European author), Lord of the Rings (though I feel like a geek for saying so), Gone With the Wind, and the Patrick O'Brian seafaring novels. Clavell's Shogun also gets a frequent reading.

For mysteries I prefer Dick Francis, his characters are so well drawn.

Because I'm cheap, I've explored the free books available on Kindle extensively and that led me to Stoker's Dracula (a revelation) and Tarzan. The latter, while not great literature, is a fantastic window into a previous era when readers could be swept up by such tales of distant places.

Angela
07-11-19, 19:11
I could never get into poetry, but looking at my Kindle I can see that I frequently reread Pride & Prejudice, Wouk's Winds of War (I guess an American fits as a European author), Lord of the Rings (though I feel like a geek for saying so), Gone With the Wind, and the Patrick O'Brian seafaring novels. Clavell's Shogun also gets a frequent reading.

For mysteries I prefer Dick Francis, his characters are so well drawn.

Because I'm cheap, I've explored the free books available on Kindle extensively and that led me to Stoker's Dracula (a revelation) and Tarzan. The latter, while not great literature, is a fantastic window into a previous era when readers could be swept up by such tales of distant places.

I see we have somewhat similar tastes. I have a one volume collection of all of Jane Austen's novels and re-read them every couple of years. I'm getting more and more fond of "Persuasion". Same for Gone with the Wind, and yes, I like the Winds of War and Shogun as well. I've already said I love Lord of the Rings. :)

I've taken to getting all my fiction books on loan from the library. As long as you have a library card, getting it on a kindle is a click and done. You can extend it for more than two weeks as well. If I really want it permanently, I'll buy it. Sometimes it's almost as cheap to get a paperback good quality used copy as to get it on kindle, and for certain things, I really want "the book".

08-11-19, 02:15
I see we have somewhat similar tastes. I have a one volume collection of all of Jane Austen's novels and re-read them every couple of years. I'm getting more and more fond of "Persuasion". Same for Gone with the Wind, and yes, I like the Winds of War and Shogun as well. I've already said I love Lord of the Rings. :)

I've taken to getting all my fiction books on loan from the library. As long as you have a library card, getting it on a kindle is a click and done. You can extend it for more than two weeks as well. If I really want it permanently, I'll buy it. Sometimes it's almost as cheap to get a paperback good quality used copy as to get it on kindle, and for certain things, I really want "the book".

You're a bit like my wife then. She wants "the book," to have the feel of it in her hands as she leaves (leafs?) through the pages. I'm cool with either.

I suppose I like that both Jane Austen and Patrick O'Brian are my great likes (I also like The Influence of Sea Power on History). I've always wanted to be eclectic! Or should I say, interesting?

There is a great gap between the great Austen, P&P and Emma, and the lesser. Persuasian is good, but Mansfield Park is rather dreary and no one would read Northanger Abbey if the author hadn't written P&P.