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DavidCoutts
13-07-11, 01:08
I apologise in advance for this Thread: I'm probably reading this entirely wrong, given my extremely limited knowledge of Genetics and Ancestry.

So, having got that out of the way; I read in another DNA Forum that L159.2 has been found in Ireland - it is apparently linked to some Irish kings - as well as the UK, the Hebrides, Norway and Denmark.

According to the post I read, the Norwegians who tested positive for L159.2 and the Scots differed in one area: the Norwegians all had a value of 10 at DYS391, while none of the Scots did.

If the L159 in Norway was a result of Scots living in Norway, perhaps taken there as slaves during the Viking era, I would have expected the Norwegian L159.2's to have similar DYS391 values(told you I was a Newbie:ashamed2:).

The fact that the Norwegians had a different value leads me to ask this question; if an L21+/L159.2 + Scot has a value of 10 at DYS391, does this indicate possible Norwegian/Viking ancestry?

Or, far more probable, have I got it all completely wrong?

Thanks for taking the time to read this.

Canek
13-07-11, 19:25
If you have norwegian ancestry... you may also have a bit of amerindian heritage. Did you made a complete test?

DavidCoutts
13-07-11, 20:04
That depends on how you define "complete". I had my Y DNA tested by GeneBase and came back as R1b L21+. I have'nt yet tested for L159.2.

Excuse my ignorance, but why would there be an automatic link between Norse and Amerindian ancestry?

sparkey
13-07-11, 20:17
I'm actually not that familiar with L159.2, it's downstream of L21, right? L21 is principally Celtic, but has some representation around Norway. Does L159.2 isolate the Norwegian bit? If so, it could indicate that it is Norse, or that it has a Norse component (and the rest is Celtic, like is typical of L21). It depends on the age of L159.2, which I don't know.


Excuse my ignorance, but why would there be an automatic link between Norse and Amerindian ancestry?

Canek suspects that North Germanic peoples are in part Amerindian on the basis that they have Y-DNA Q and mtDNA C. I think (and I believe most others think) that this is primarily from shared Siberian ancestry, rather than anything like early Inuit colonization of Scandinavia, which is what I think Canek is trying to imply.

DavidCoutts
13-07-11, 20:45
IIRC, the approximate age of L159.2 is something around 1,500 years, although I could be completely wrong. If it is true, though, that would tie in with the Viking Age...

sparkey
13-07-11, 20:53
IIRC, the approximate age of L159.2 is something around 1,500 years, although I could be completely wrong. If it is true, though, that would tie in with the Viking Age...

That's very young, and would make it easy to isolate it as a component Early Middle Age population like the Vikings. If it's really that young and appears where you say it does, then I don't know of another explanation for it. It would just about have to be a conquering population of some sort to expand so much in so little time.

DavidCoutts
13-07-11, 21:07
I'll try and double check the timeline.

Canek
14-07-11, 14:07
That depends on how you define "complete". I had my Y DNA tested by GeneBase and came back as R1b L21+. I have'nt yet tested for L159.2.

Excuse my ignorance, but why would there be an automatic link between Norse and Amerindian ancestry?

Norwegians have amerindian heritage in their blood.

Canek
14-07-11, 14:26
More info David: http://www.twcenter.net/forums/showthread.php?t=314935

Canek
14-07-11, 14:43
You may want to see this thread also: http://www.eupedia.com/forum/showthread.php?26580-DNA-Shows-Viking-Amerindian-Link-To-Iceland

Canek
14-07-11, 14:43
DNA Shows Viking, Amerindian Link To Iceland


DNA Shows Viking, Amerindian Link To Iceland

Posted on: Thursday, 18 November 2010, 07:37 CST
Vikings may be responsible for bringing the first Native American to Europe via Iceland more than a thousand years ago, Spanish and Icelandic researchers suggest in a new study.
The findings may confirm long-accepted theories, based on Icelandic medieval texts and a Viking settlement in Newfoundland in Canada, that Vikings reached the Americas several centuries before Christopher Columbus did in 1492.
The Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) said genetic analysis of about 80 people from four Icelandic families showed they possess a type of DNA normally found only in Native Americans or East Asians.
�It was thought at first that (the DNA) came from recently established Asian families in Iceland,� CSIC researcher Carles Lalueza-Fox said in a statement, according to the institute.
�But when family genealogy was studied, it was discovered that the four families were descended from ancestors who lived between 1710 and 1740 from the same region of southern Iceland,� He said.
The specific gene -- C1e -- was found to also be mitochondrial, which means the genes were introduced into Iceland by a woman.
�As the island was virtually isolated from the 10th century, the most likely hypothesis is that these genes corresponded to an Amerindian woman who was brought from America by the Vikings around the year 1000,� Lalueza-Fox told the AFP news agency.
Data for the study was used from the Icelandic-based genomics firm deCODE Genetics. Lalueza-Fox said the research team hopes to find more instances of the same Native American DNA in Iceland�s population.
The report, published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, said 75 to 80 percent of modern-day Icelanders can trace their lineage to Scandinavia, while nearly the rest trace back to Scotland and Ireland.
The C1e gene makes up a very small percentage of those who can trace some of their lineage back to the Americas.
�Contrary to an initial assumption that this lineage was a recent arrival (in Iceland), preliminary genealogical analyses revealed that the C1 lineage was present in the Icelandic mitochondrial DNA pool at least 300 years ago,� the journal reported.
�This raised the intriguing possibility that the Icelandic C1 lineage could be traced to Viking voyages to the Americas that commenced in the 10th century,� said the journal.


http://www.redorbit.com/news/science...nk_to_iceland/ (http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1952940/dna_shows_viking_amerindian_link_to_iceland/)


Bye.

DavidCoutts
14-07-11, 15:02
Thanks for the links, Canek.