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View Full Version : Interested to learn how many have Hunt surname and Haplogroup J24a -- anyone?



pdarwin
05-05-13, 05:06
Hello everyone - first post here. I have read that J2a4 is fairly rare - likely even more so for me as I am 50% English and 43% Scandinavian (by autosomal DNA). Surname is Hunt. Research appears to indicate my ancestor moved into England (Wiltshire) after the Norman invasion of 1066.

BakodiP
05-05-13, 10:52
You are J2 and half-Scandinavian, half-English, I think is quite rare! I mean your Y-DNA haplogroup in that area of Europe.

Yaan
05-05-13, 11:51
Hello everyone - first post here. I have read that J2a4 is fairly rare - likely even more so for me as I am 50% English and 43% Scandinavian (by autosomal DNA). Surname is Hunt. Research appears to indicate my ancestor moved into England (Wiltshire) after the Norman invasion of 1066.
I am Bulgarian and I am J2a4h also known as J-M530. Is this what u r? In Bulgarian this group is 2.4%, so it is rare for us too.It is also the biggest subgroup of J2a in Bulgaria and the second biggest J2 after the Balkan J2b2 which is 3.8%. This group is rare everywhere, still in is like 6-7% in Iran and it is observed in some places of Italy. Every European and Middle Eastern population has it, but in small %. I guessed we were the elite in the tribes :embarassed:

RHAS
22-08-13, 21:22
"Rare names are strikingly more likely to share haplogroups than are common names. In the highest-frequency decile, only 7/15 surname pairs share a haplogroup, as opposed to 14/15 for the lowest-frequency decile (p = 0.001). In the high-frequency half of all surname pairs, 47% share a haplogroup, while in the low-frequency half the figure is 69% (p < 0.01). Furthermore, a greater proportion of the sharing observed within the high-frequency half probably occurs by chance, since it is overwhelmingly (91%) in hg R1b, the most prevalent haplogroup in the population. By contrast, in the low-frequency half, only 65% of sharing is within hg R1b, and there are examples of sharing within the rare haplogroups (R1a, G, DE, J2, and K*), which strongly suggests that the sharing is due to common ancestry."
Genetic Signatures of Coancestry within Surnames.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982206000650 (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982206000650)

"Some haplogroups that are rare (,10%) or absent in the controls exist at high frequencies within particular surnames: Examples are hgA1a in R, E1a in Bray, G in ‘‘Wadsworth,’’ J2 in Ketley, T in ‘‘Feakes,’’ Q* in ‘‘Mallinson,’’ R1* in ‘‘Northam,’’ and R1a in ‘‘Swindlehurst’’ (fig. 2a)."
Founders, Drift, and Infidelity: The Relationship between Y Chromosome Diversity and Patrilineal Surnames.
http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/5/1093.full.pdf (http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/5/1093.full.pdf)