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View Full Version : Distribution of haplogroup T in Italy (Boattini et al.)



Maciamo
10-06-13, 11:05
The new paper by Boattini et al. (http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0065441) is the first Italy-wide study to report haplogroup T separately from K (along with Brisighelli et al. 2012 (http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0050794), which reported it as K2). It therefore provides valuable insight into this little studied haplogroup.

The sample sizes for each province tested is unfortunately too small to get a balanced view of haplogroup T's distribution. With a sample size under 100, low frequencies (under 3%) can often be missed altogether. It's also easy to get fake hotspots with just two samples out of 25, which makes it look like 8% when in fact a larger sample size would probably have resulted in 2 or 3%. So the frequencies here are to be taken with a pinch of salt.


North Italy

In Cuneo, south-west Piedmont, 1 out of 30 samples belongs to haplogroup T (3.5%).

In Savona/Genova, central Liguria, 0 out of 50 samples belongs to haplogroup T (0%).

In Como, north-west Lombardy, 0 out of 41 samples belongs to haplogroup T (0%).

In Brescia, north-east Lombardy, 1 out of 39 samples belongs to haplogroup T (2.5%).

In Vicenza, central-west Veneto, 2 out of 40 samples belongs to haplogroup T (5%).

In Treviso, central-east Veneto, 0 out of 30 samples belongs to haplogroup T (0%).

In Bologna, central Emilia-Romagna, 0 out of 29 samples I1 (0%).


Central Italy

In La Spezia-Massa, north-west Tuscany, 2 out of 24 samples belongs to haplogroup T (8%).

In Pistoia, central-north Tuscany, 0 out of 13 samples belongs to haplogroup T (0%).

In Grosetto-Siena, southern Tuscany, 2 out of 86 samples belongs to haplogroup T (2.5%).

In Foligno, central-east Umbria, 0 out of 37 samples belongs to haplogroup T (0%).

In Macerata, central-east Marche, 0 out of 40 samples belongs to haplogroup T (0%).


South Italy

In L'Aquila, Abruzzo, 6 out of 23 samples belongs to haplogroup T (26%), including three T2-P77.

In Campobasso, Molise, 0 out of 29 samples belongs to haplogroup T (0%).

In Benevento, Campania, 1 out of 36 samples belongs to haplogroup T (2.5%).

In Matera, Basilicata, 2 samples out of 25 belongs to haplogroup T (8%).

In Lecce, Apulia, 0 out of 39 samples belongs to haplogroup T (0%).

In Cosenza/Catanzaro/Crotone, Calabria, 0 out of 38 samples belongs to haplogroup T (0%).

In Catania, eastern Sicily, 0 out of 62 samples belongs to haplogroup T (0%).

In Ragusa, southeast Sicily, 2 out of 44 samples belongs to haplogroup T (4.5%).

In Agrigento, southwest Sicily, 1 out of 42 samples belongs to haplogroup T (2.5%)

In Olbia/Tempio/Nuoro, north-east Sardinia, 0 out of 40 samples belongs to haplogroup T (0%).

In Oristano, central-west Sardinia, 1 out of 42 samples belongs to haplogroup T (2.5%).


In comparison, Brisighelli et al. 2012 only found haplogroup T in their samples from:

- Liguria (4.3%)
- north-west Marche (7.9%)
- central Basilicata (3.3%)
- north-west Calabria (3.8%)
- Sicily (1.7%)

It was 0% elsewhere. This data doesn't agree with Boattini et al. which found 0% in Liguria, Marche or Calabria, meaning that larger sample sizes are required.

Ferri et al. 2007 (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0379073807005816%22) found 1.5% in Valmarecchia but 0% in nearby Rimini, both in eastern Romagna. The average for the two is 0.6%.

Battaglia et al. 2008 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2947100/) found 3.3% of T in Trento, southern Trentino-Alto-Adige ot of 67 samples.

Di Gaetano et al. 2009 (http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v17/n1/full/ejhg2008120a.html) found 3.3% in western Sicily and 7.9% in eastern Sicily, with big variations between places.