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Sile
10-08-13, 21:46
Anyone done this?

I am doing mine at the moment and came across the meaning of SNP alpha markers , as per example

Every SNP discovered is prefaced with a letter that tells people which lab or university discovered the SNP. The L SNPs have all been discovered at Family Tree DNA’s (http://www.familytreedna.com/cj.aspx?ftdna_ref=336)Genomics Lab in Houston, Texas, run by Thomas Krahn. They are the product of the WTY discovery process.

M = Peter Underhill, Ph.D. of Stanford University
PF = Paolo Francalacci, Ph.D., Università di Sassari, Sassari, Italy
P = Michael Hammer, Ph.D. of University of Arizona
L = Thomas Krahn, MSc (Dipl.-Ing.) of Family Tree DNA's Genomics Research Center
Z = G. Magoon, Richard Rocca, Vince Tilroe, David F. Reynolds, Bonnie Schrack, Peter M. Op den Velde Boots, Ray H. Banks, Roman Sychev

Some examples are above, my question is, when WTY are being done, does the lab which is doing your WTY have full access to other lab which found these SNP markers?

nordicwarrior
12-08-13, 02:00
Excellent post. I don't know the answer to your question, but please let us know if you find anything.

ebAmerican
12-08-13, 17:48
If they are collaborating, but I don't think so. It's probably why the ISSOG is updated every year and haplogroups like R have 13 designations, and confuse the hell out of me. People on this site use different SNP names, like R1b-P310 for L11, et..

Mikewww
12-08-13, 23:13
Anyone done this?

I am doing mine at the moment and came across the meaning of SNP alpha markers , as per example

Every SNP discovered is prefaced with a letter that tells people which lab or university discovered the SNP. The L SNPs have all been discovered at Family Tree DNA’s (http://www.familytreedna.com/cj.aspx?ftdna_ref=336)Genomics Lab in Houston, Texas, run by Thomas Krahn. They are the product of the WTY discovery process.

M = Peter Underhill, Ph.D. of Stanford University
PF = Paolo Francalacci, Ph.D., Università di Sassari, Sassari, Italy
P = Michael Hammer, Ph.D. of University of Arizona
L = Thomas Krahn, MSc (Dipl.-Ing.) of Family Tree DNA's Genomics Research Center
Z = G. Magoon, Richard Rocca, Vince Tilroe, David F. Reynolds, Bonnie Schrack, Peter M. Op den Velde Boots, Ray H. Banks, Roman Sychev

Some examples are above, my question is, when WTY are being done, does the lab which is doing your WTY have full access to other lab which found these SNP markers?


Since FTDNA is the only group actually executing the WTY tests, their policies have control. I don't think pass on data to other labs or groups without the individual's approval, but I think in the case of WTY they indicate they ask for some kind of pre-approval.

I think you have to ask FTDNA directly this question.

Mikewww
12-08-13, 23:15
If they are collaborating, but I don't think so. It's probably why the ISSOG is updated every year and haplogroups like R have 13 designations, and confuse the hell out of me. People on this site use different SNP names, like R1b-P310 for L11, et..

There is a lot of collaboration of citizen scientists and testing companies, but not enough standardization across the board. The commercial testing companies are competitors with each other so I think they will only go so far as far as working with each other.

ISOGG is really just folks like us. It's made up of just volunteers.

It is an integrating group sharing information in all directions and trying to keep up a current and documented Y phylogenetic tree. ISOGG is the only entity coming close on that endeavor.

nordicwarrior
13-08-13, 03:08
Mikewww, I nominate you for the ISOGG board membership (of course I have zero pull in this organization). But seriously if it's made up of volunteers you should try and get involved because you have a balanced approach to this stuff. Sparkey would be good candidate as well.