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Veritator
26-11-13, 11:21
Compare and contrast Turkish and Armenian autosomal DNA test results.

Post any relevant material you possess that may assist in this investigation.

Post charts, tables of data, tests results, figures and graphs, excerpts from websites of studies or articles, links or references to sources online...etc.

It is also OK to post Y-chromosome DNA studies, figures, tables, etc. The more the merrier.

Veritator
04-12-13, 02:27
http://i43.tinypic.com/11jst3m.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/2yo5z86.png
Source of this figure (http://dodecad.blogspot.ca/2011/01/admixture-analysis-with-dodecad.html)

Veritator
04-12-13, 02:31
Click this link
Go to Page 9 of DNA Tribes' Nine Continental Zones Admixture Analysis (http://www.dnatribes.com/dnatribes-snp-admixture-2013-05-14.pdf)

Veritator
04-12-13, 02:33
http://i43.tinypic.com/99lw9c.png
Source of this figure (http://dienekes.blogspot.ca/2011/05/central-asian-element-in-turks-part-3.html)

Veritator
04-12-13, 02:38
The following is a Y-DNA haplogroup analysis of Turks
http://i40.tinypic.com/2v2ccnd.png
For the source of this figure, click this link (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_history_of_the_Turkish_people)

Veritator
04-12-13, 02:40
Genetic affinities comparison:
http://i41.tinypic.com/14v7nfc.png
Source of this figure (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Genetic_affinities_among_southeastern_Europea n_and_Central_Asian_populations.png)

Veritator
04-12-13, 02:42
Follow this link to Caucasus Wiki for a breakdown of Y-DNA haplogroups of Armenians (http://caucasus.wikia.com/wiki/Armenian_Genetics)

Veritator
04-12-13, 02:45
This link leads you to a website where major studies of Armenian DNA are discussed and sourced. (http://www.khazaria.com/genetics/armenians.html)

Veritator
04-12-13, 02:48
http://i39.tinypic.com/deqwb7.png
Source of this figure. Check out the other figures and tables of this website. (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp/2010/12/are-turks-acculturated-armenians/#.Up57MtiwUYI)

Veritator
04-12-13, 02:52
Another Y-DNA study bearing the following title:
Armenian Y-chromosome haplotypes reveal strong regional structure within a single ethno-national group (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/tcga/tcgapdf/Weale-HG-01-Armenia.pdf)

Veritator
04-12-13, 02:59
Paternal lineage analysis supports an Armenian rather than a Central Asian origin of the Hamshenis. (http://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1001&context=humbiol_preprints)

Veritator
04-12-13, 03:03
Regionalized autosomal STR profiles among Armenian groups suggest disparate genetic influences

Robert K. Lowery

Abstract
The archeology and ethnology of Armenia suggest that this region has acted as a crossroads for human migrations from Europe and the Middle East since at least the Neolithic. Near continual foreign influx has, in turn, led to the supposition that the gene pools of geographically separated Armenian populations may have diverged as differing historical influences potentially left distinct genetic traces in the various regions of the Armenian plateau. In this study, we seek to address whether any evidence for such genetic regional partitioning in Armenians exists by analyzing, for the first time, 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci in 404 Armenians from four geographically well-characterized collections (Ararat Valley, Gardman, Sasun, and Lake Van) that represent distinct communities from across Historical Armenia. In addition, to determine whether genetic differences among these four Armenian populations are the result of differential affinities to populations of known historical influence in Armenia, we utilize 27 biogeographically targeted reference populations for phylogenetic and admixture analyses. From these examinations, we find that while close genetic affiliations exist between the two easternmost Armenian groups analyzed, Ararat Valley and Gardman, the remaining two populations display substantial distinctions. In particular, Sasun is distinguished by evidence for genetic contributions from Turkey, while a stronger Balkan component is detected in Lake Van, potentially suggestive of remnant genetic influences from ancient Greek and Phrygian populations in this region.




Source of this excerpt

http://i43.tinypic.com/1zbtq1x.png
(http://dienekes.blogspot.ca/2011/08/armenian-population-structure-with.html)

Veritator
04-12-13, 03:05
http://i44.tinypic.com/n3sx1t.png

Veritator
04-12-13, 03:06
Admixture results of 19 Armenians

http://i41.tinypic.com/e049pu.png

Veritator
04-12-13, 03:15
Link to a test which demonstrates that among Iranians, Assyrians, Armenians, and Turks, it is the Iranians who overlap the least with Europeans, while the former groups overlap with Europeans as well as each other.

Here's the link! (http://iranian.com/main/blog/jahanshah-javid/genetics-iranians-least-similar-europeans-or-other-near-easterners.html)

Veritator
04-12-13, 03:20
Source of the study. (http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v20/n3/full/ejhg2011192a.html)

Abstract


Armenia, situated between the Black and Caspian Seas, lies at the junction of Turkey, Iran, Georgia, Azerbaijan and former Mesopotamia. This geographic position made it a potential contact zone between Eastern and Western civilizations. In this investigation, we assess Y-chromosomal diversity in four geographically distinct populations that represent the extent of historical Armenia. We find a striking prominence of haplogroups previously implicated with the Agricultural Revolution in the Near East, including the J2a-M410-, R1b1b1*-L23-, G2a-P15- and J1-M267-derived lineages. Given that the Last Glacial Maximum event in the Armenian plateau occured a few millennia before the Neolithic era, we envision a scenario in which its repopulation was achieved mainly by the arrival of farmers from the Fertile Crescent temporally coincident with the initial inception of farming in Greece. However, we detect very restricted genetic affinities with Europe that suggest any later cultural diffusions from Armenia to Europe were not associated with substantial amounts of paternal gene flow, despite the presence of closely related Indo-European languages in both Armenia and Southeast Europe.

Veritator
04-12-13, 03:26
Multidimensional Scaling Analysis
http://i44.tinypic.com/28bv76x.gif
Source (http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v13/n12/fig_tab/5201482f3.html?url=/ejhg/journal/v13/n12/full/5201482a.html#figure-title)

Veritator
04-12-13, 03:29
Map of the frequency distribution of the R1 haplotypes (Y-chromosome analysis), from the European Journal of Human Genetics. (http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v13/n12/fig_tab/5201482f2.html?url=/ejhg/journal/v13/n12/full/5201482a.html#figure-title)
http://i39.tinypic.com/2dtrh8y.jpg

Veritator
04-12-13, 10:28
Quotes by authorities on the subject (http://www.armeniansworld.com/category/armenian-dna/)

1.
University of Tartu
Faculty of Biology and Geography
Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology
Department of Evolutionary Biology
Urmas Roostalu
M Sc. Rva-Liis Loogvali
Prof Dr. Richard Villems
Tartu 2004

“In our study the ancestry of the Armenians was traced back to different parts of Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan and Turkey, illustrating the fact that historic Armenia was a much larger territory than that of the present Republic of Armenia”.

Veritator
04-12-13, 10:29
2.
–Banoei, Chaleshtori, Sanati, Shariati, Houshmand, Majidizadeh, Soltani & Golalipour (2007)
Variation of DAT1 VNTR Alleles and Genotypes Among Old Ethnic Groups in Mesopotamia to the Oxus Region.

“The Armenians are a nation and an ethnic group originating from the Caucasus
and eastern Anatolia, where a large concentration of this community has
remained, especially in Armenia.”

Veritator
04-12-13, 10:30
3.

Movsesian and Kochar, 2000

“Cranial similarities between modern Armenians and the Armenians of Armenia 1600 – 700 BC indicate the continuity of the genetic connection to the ancient people ”

Veritator
04-12-13, 10:31
4.
ALU INSERTION POLYMORPHISMS IN POPULATIONS
OF THE SOUTH CAUCASUS

“Armenians are a separate ethnic group,
which originated from Neolithic tribes of the Armenian Uplands”

Litvinov S*, Kutuev I, Yunusbayev B, Khusainova R, Valiev R,
Khusnutdinova E

Veritator
04-12-13, 10:35
5.
40% of Armenian genes dates back to Paleolithic era.
Levon Yepiskoposyan

6.

The result of the over 300 individuals that have already been tested revealed that the Armenian branches of DNA are at the root of many branches in Europe.

Armenians belong to 13 distinct genetic groups that go back tens of thousands of years, while at the same time there is no trace of invaders in their DNA in the last 4000 years, making them "homogeneous in their diversity".

Armenian DNA Project at Family Tree DNA (http://www.haigazian.edu.lb/NewsEvents/Pages/default.aspx?NewsID=294#)

Veritator
04-12-13, 10:42
7.
“Modern Armenians and Armenian inhabitants around that time [Neolithic era] have cranial similarities, indicating a genetic continuity with ancient populations. Spread to Indian subcontinent and Europe.”

Luigi Cavalli-Sforza (1922-), world renowned population geneticist, Princeton University.
Author of many books including:
Cavalli-Sforza, L. L., & P. Menozzi, A. Piazza. (1994). The History and Geography of Human Genes.

Princeton University Press, Princeton.
Cavalli-Sforza, L. (2000). Genes, Peoples, and Languages, tr. Mark Seielstad, North Point Press.

http://www.bjmg.edu.mk/record.asp?subrecordid=970
http://dspace.utlib.ee/dspace/bitstream/handle/10062/782/Roostalu.pdf?sequence=5

Different peoples throughout different times used different names for Armenia and Armenians. The Sumerians in around 2,800 BCE called Armenia – Aratta, while the Akkadians that succeeded them in the second half of Third Millennium BCE called Armenia – Armani or Armanum. The Hittites who rose in the Second Millennium BCE called Armenia – Hayasa, while the Assyrians who arose in the second half of Second Millennium BCE called Armenia – Uruatri or Urartu (Ararat of the Bible).
Aratta is considered the first recorded Armenian state.It is mentioned in the oldest Sumerian texts that we have found about the Epic of Gilgamesh. Although it is mentioned in the earliest inscriptions, about 4.800 years ago that does not mean Aratta did not exist before that. Quentin Atkinson and Russell Gray have proved that Armenian language already split from the Mother Tongue in the Indo-European Homeland in Armenian Highland some 8,500 years ago. When our ancestors built Portasar about 12,000 years ago there was already some kind of level of sophisticated organization which was surely required to accomplish such a massive undertaken for its time period.

Veritator
04-12-13, 10:45
8.
Peter Hrechdakian on “Armenian DNA Haplogroups: Ancient, Unique & Relevant”
Beirut, October 7, 2010- On October 5, 2010, Peter Hrechdakian, Administrator of the Armenian DNA Project at Family Tree DNA, delivered a lecture entitled “Armenian DNA Haplogroups: Ancient, Unique & Relevant” for the first Cultural Hour of this academic year in the Haigazian University Auditorium. This lecture is the first in a series of events and activities planned over the year, commemorating Haigazian University’s 55th anniversary.

Hrechdakian was visiting from Belgium, where he is currently working on the Armenian DNA Project, and was introduced to the audience by Dr. Arda Ekmekji, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Ekmekji stated that we uphold “a liberal arts system,” making us interdisciplinary, so that even scientific issues such as genetics and the makeup of the Armenian DNA are discussed in lectures at Haigazian.

Hrechdakian began his lecture by explaining how Armenian DNA is ancient, unique and relevant to the other populations in the world. Although himself neither a biologist nor a geneticist, Hrechdakian conveyed to the audience his passion for the Armenian DNA Project, which is based on individual DNA testing in collaboration with Family Tree DNA.
DNA testing, Hrechdakian emphasized, is very important for Armenians since most of their genealogical records were burned by the Ottoman Empire and this is a way for them to recover their history.
Going over the more scientific aspects of the topic, Hrechdakian described how paternal and maternal lines could each be uncovered by studying a different part of our DNA. He showed that Armenians belong to 13 distinct genetic groups that go back tens of thousands of years, while at the same time there is no trace of invaders in their DNA in the last 4000 years, making them “homogeneous in their diversity.”
Hrechdakian concluded with some surprising finds concerning Armenian DNA as a result of the over 300 individuals that have already been tested, revealing that the Armenian branches of DNA are at the root of many branches in Europe. In addition, 85% of Armenian groups are native to the region, having lived there even before the Armenian language came into existence.
This DNA project started 1 year ago and by 2011 Hrechdakian hopes to have 1000 individuals tested. It is his wish that other people will take interest and that the work will expand to research on ancient DNA, studying human remains that are thousands of years old, thus continuing to delve into the secrets of Armenian history and indeed that of the entire world.

http://www.haigazian.edu.lb/NewsEvents/Pages/default.aspx?NewsID=294

Veritator
04-12-13, 10:47
“The Armenians are a nation and an ethnic group originating from the Caucasus
and eastern Anatolia, where a large concentration of this community has
remained, especially in Armenia.”

Nasidze,Ling, Quinque, Dupanloup, Cordaux, Rychkov, Naumova, Zhukova, Sarraf-Zadegan, Naderi, Asgary, Sardas, Farhud, Sarkisian, Asadov, Kerimov, Stoneking (2004)

”Analyses of a number of classical genetic markers (blood groups, serum proteins, red cell enzymes) showed substantial genetic diversity in the Caucasus (Barbujani et al. 1994a,b). The results of these studies indicated a single ancient origin for the Caucasus populations.”

Veritator
04-12-13, 10:52
Armenian Y-DNA (Paternal) Haplogroups (http://www.familytreedna.com/public/armeniadnaproject/default.aspx?section=news)
(Updated on 28 january 2012)

R1b1a2a represents the largest haplogroup for Armenians in general and project members in particular. It has been estimated to be 8,000 years old. According to Vince Vizachero who runs the haplogroup R-ht35 Project (http://www.familytreedna.com/public/ht35new/default.aspx): "From prior analysis, it appears that R1b1a2a moved north and west into Europe quite rapidly. And the data we are seeing in our project are consistent with that: the oldest forms of R1b1a2a are found at high frequency in the "homeland" of SW Asia and places with the most contact with that region. The closer we get to NW Europe, the more we observe the youngest, derived forms of R1b1a2a." The current distribution of this haplogroup shows a heavy concentration in Western Europe (from the Northern part of the Iberian peninsula to Ireland and England via France and Belgium) as can be seen in this MAP. (http://www.arslanmb.org/ArmenianDNAProject/Haplogroup-R1b.gif) The map corroborates Vince's conclusions as it shows a 15% concentration of R1b1a2a in a Northern swath of Anatolia - with a peak of 25% in the middle of the swath. The studies on which the map makers drew sampled broadly in the region including Turks, Kurds, Georgians and Azeris. If you sample only Armenians, you get a concentration of 30% of R1b1a2. If you sample only Armenians from Karabakh and Syunik you get concentrations of more than 40%.

Veritator
04-12-13, 10:59
Armenian Haplogroup Distribution Map (http://arslanmb.org/ArmenianDNAProject/Armenian-yDNA-Haplogroups.pdf)

Veritator
04-12-13, 11:07
The blogger Dienekes raises the question:

"All of the above combine (http://dienekes.blogspot.ca/2012/09/armenians-as-phrygian-colonists-or.html)to make a pretty compelling story. Could it be that Armenians preserve a legacy of admixture between a linguistically Indo-European speaking, genetically Sardinian-like population, which arrived in Asia Minor from the Balkans at the end of the Bronze Age, finally settling in the Armenian Highlands, and mixing with the local people they encountered?"

Veritator
04-12-13, 11:20
Mediterranean Admixture


http://i40.tinypic.com/11wg8zb.gif

Veritator
04-12-13, 11:21
Red Sea Admixture

http://i39.tinypic.com/30j5zjm.gif

Veritator
04-12-13, 11:22
West Asian Admixture


http://i39.tinypic.com/2008z8m.gif

Veritator
04-12-13, 11:23
African Admixture

http://i43.tinypic.com/20pvxwx.gif

Veritator
04-12-13, 11:24
East European Admixture

http://i41.tinypic.com/28so6df.gif

Veritator
04-12-13, 11:25
East Asian Admixture

http://i42.tinypic.com/2i8zx35.gif

Veritator
04-12-13, 11:26
South-West Asian Admixture

http://i42.tinypic.com/2lawv84.gif

Veritator
04-12-13, 11:27
Gedrosian Admixture

http://i41.tinypic.com/j91wk1.gif

Veritator
04-12-13, 11:28
Caucasian Admixture

http://i39.tinypic.com/33tqble.gif

Kardu
04-12-13, 11:28
Armenian Y-DNA (Paternal) Haplogroups (http://www.familytreedna.com/public/armeniadnaproject/default.aspx?section=news)
(Updated on 28 january 2012)

R1b1a2a represents the largest haplogroup for Armenians in general and project members in particular. It has been estimated to be 8,000 years old. According to Vince Vizachero who runs the haplogroup R-ht35 Project (http://www.familytreedna.com/public/ht35new/default.aspx): "From prior analysis, it appears that R1b1a2a moved north and west into Europe quite rapidly. And the data we are seeing in our project are consistent with that: the oldest forms of R1b1a2a are found at high frequency in the "homeland" of SW Asia and places with the most contact with that region. The closer we get to NW Europe, the more we observe the youngest, derived forms of R1b1a2a." The current distribution of this haplogroup shows a heavy concentration in Western Europe (from the Northern part of the Iberian peninsula to Ireland and England via France and Belgium) as can be seen in this MAP. (http://www.arslanmb.org/ArmenianDNAProject/Haplogroup-R1b.gif) The map corroborates Vince's conclusions as it shows a 15% concentration of R1b1a2a in a Northern swath of Anatolia - with a peak of 25% in the middle of the swath. The studies on which the map makers drew sampled broadly in the region including Turks, Kurds, Georgians and Azeris. If you sample only Armenians, you get a concentration of 30% of R1b1a2. If you sample only Armenians from Karabakh and Syunik you get concentrations of more than 40%.

Keep in mind that Karabakh used to be Caucasian Albania in early medieval times and antiquity.

Kardu
05-12-13, 11:51
What Veritator (http://www.eupedia.com/forum/members/48229-Veritator)? Was not Karabakh part of Albania?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/04/Ancient_countries_of_Transcaucasia.jpg

Veritator
17-12-13, 04:23
What Veritator (http://www.eupedia.com/forum/members/48229-Veritator)? Was not Karabakh part of Albania?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/04/Ancient_countries_of_Transcaucasia.jpg

That's Caucasian Albania. It may have been.

Veritator
17-12-13, 04:24
http://i43.tinypic.com/24glqjb.png

Veritator
17-12-13, 04:32
Excavating Y-chromosome haplotype strata in Anatolia.Cinnioğlu C (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Cinnio%C4%9Flu%20C%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), King R (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=King%20R%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Kivisild T (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Kivisild%20T%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Kalfoğlu E (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Kalfo%C4%9Flu%20E%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Atasoy S (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Atasoy%20S%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Cavalleri GL (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Cavalleri%20GL%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Lillie AS (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Lillie%20AS%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Roseman CC (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Roseman%20CC%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Lin AA (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Lin%20AA%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Prince K (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Prince%20K%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Oefner PJ (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Oefner%20PJ%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Shen P (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Shen%20P%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Semino O (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Semino%20O%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639), Cavalli-Sforza LL (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Cavalli-Sforza%20LL%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639),Underhill PA (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Underhill%20PA%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=14586639).



Abstract (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14586639)

Analysis of 89 biallelic polymorphisms in 523 Turkish Y chromosomes revealed 52 distinct haplotypes with considerable haplogroup substructure, as exemplified by their respective levels of accumulated diversity at ten short tandem repeat (STR) loci. The major components (haplogroups E3b, G, J, I, L, N, K2, and R1; 94.1%) are shared with European and neighboring Near Eastern populations and contrast with only a minor share of haplogroups related to Central Asian (C, Q and O; 3.4%), Indian (H, R2; 1.5%) and African (A, E3*, E3a; 1%) affinity. The expansion times for 20 haplogroup assemblages was estimated from associated STR diversity. This comprehensive characterization of Y-chromosome heritage addresses many multifaceted aspects of Anatolian prehistory, including: (1) the most frequent haplogroup, J, splits into two sub-clades, one of which (J2) shows decreasing variances with increasing latitude, compatible with a northward expansion; (2) haplogroups G1 and L show affinities with south Caucasus populations in their geographic distribution as well as STR motifs; (3) frequency of haplogroup I, which originated in Europe, declines with increasing longitude, indicating gene flow arriving from Europe; (4) conversely, haplogroup G2 radiates towards Europe; (5) haplogroup E3b3 displays a latitudinal correlation with decreasing frequency northward; (6) haplogroup R1b3 emanates from Turkey towards Southeast Europe and Caucasia and; (7) high resolution SNP analysis provides evidence of a detectable yet weak signal (<9%) of recent paternal gene flow from Central Asia. The variety of Turkish haplotypes is witness to Turkey being both an important source and recipient of gene flow.

Veritator
17-12-13, 04:37
TURKEY - TÜRKIYE - Y-DNA Classic Chart (http://www.familytreedna.com/public/turkey/default.aspx?section=yresults)

Chart of Y-DNA STR markers of Turkish samples

Veritator
17-12-13, 04:43
Anatolian Turkish Genetics: Abstracts and Summaries (http://www.khazaria.com/genetics/anatolian-turks.html)

Excerpt:

Genetic studies tell us that the Anatolian Turks (those Turks who live in theRepublic of Turkey (http://www.khazaria.com/turkic/turkey.html)) are a mix of West Asian, Central Asian, and Northeast Asian ancestral elements, but primarily West Asian. This means most Turks have deep roots in Turkey and are descended from peoples like the Armenians (http://www.khazaria.com/genetics/armenians.html) and the Hittites who once lived in large numbers in that land. Some "Turks" in Turkey also have recent ancestry from the Balkans (e.g., Albanians, Bosnians) and Caucasus (e.g., Circassians (http://www.khazaria.com/genetics/circassians.html)) but have fully assimilated into Turkish culture. Some "Turks" have some recent Jewish (Israelite) ancestors (http://www.khazaria.com/genetics/abstracts.html)."


Excerpts from Abstract (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14586639): (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14586639)

The major components (haplogroups E3b, G, J, I, L, N, K2, and R1; 94.1%) are shared with European and neighboring Near Eastern populations and contrast with only a minor share of haplogroups related to Central Asian (C, Q and O; 3.4%), Indian (H, R2; 1.5%) and African (A, E3*, E3a; 1%) affinity. [...] high resolution SNP analysis provides evidence of a detectable yet weak signal (<9%) of recent paternal gene flow from Central Asia. The variety of Turkish haplotypes is witness to Turkey being both an important source and recipient of gene flow.

Below are Y-DNA haplogroups Cinnioğlu's team (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14586639) found among Anatolian Turks:
E1b1b1 = 10.7% (common in the Mediterranean region)
G = 10.9% (common in the Caucasus, also found in the Middle East)
I = 5.3% (common in Central Europe, the Western Caucasus, and the Balkans)
J1 = 9% (common in Arabia and Daghestan)
J2 = 24% (common in Western Asia and Southeastern Europe and also found in Central and South Asia)
K = 4.5% (common in Asia and the Caucasus)
L = 4.2% (common in India and Khorasan)
N = 3.8% (common in Eastern Europe and North Asia, including Siberia [e.g. Turkic-speaking Yakuts], the Altai Mountains region, and the Ural Mountains region - the article however did not consider N to come to Turkey's Turks from North Asia)
Q = 1.9% (common in North Asia including Northern Altaic peoples)
R1a = 6.9% (common in Central Asia, the Caucasus, Eastern Europe, and among Indo-Aryans)
R1b = 14.7% (common in Western Europe)
T = 2.5% (common in the Mediterranean, South Asia, and Northeastern Africa)

Veritator
17-12-13, 05:17
HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 allele distribution in a large Armenian population sample. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21501120)

Matevosyan L (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Matevosyan%20L%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=21501120), Chattopadhyay S (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Chattopadhyay%20S%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=21501120), Madelian V (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Madelian%20V%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=21501120), Avagyan S (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Avagyan%20S%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=21501120), Nazaretyan M (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Nazaretyan%20M%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=21501120), Hyussian A (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Hyussian%20A%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=21501120), Vardapetyan E (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Vardapetyan%20E%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=21501120), Arutunyan R (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Arutunyan%20R%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=21501120), Jordan F (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Jordan%20F%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=21501120).
Author information (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21501120#)



Armenian Bone Marrow Donors Registry, Yerevan, Republic of Armenia.



Abstract

Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 gene frequencies were investigated in 4279 unrelated Armenian bone marrow donors. HLA alleles were defined by using PCR amplification with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) high- and low-resolution kits. The aim of this study was to examine the HLA diversity at the high-resolution level in a large Armenian population sample, and to compare HLA allele group distribution in Armenian subpopulations. The most frequently observed alleles in the HLA class I were HLA-A*0201, A*0101, A*2402, A*0301, HLA-B*5101, HLA-B*3501, and B*4901. Among DRB1 alleles, high frequencies of DRB1*1104 and DRB1*1501 were observed, followed by DRB1*1101 and DRB1*1401. The most common three-locus haplotype found in the Armenian population was A*33-B*14-DRB1*01, followed by A*03-B*35-DRB1*01. Our results show a similar distribution of alleles in Armenian subpopulations from different countries, and from different regions of the Republics of Armenia and Karabagh. The low level of genetic distances between subpopulations indicates a high level of population homogeneity, and the genetic distances between Armenians and other populations show Armenians as a distinct ethnic group relative to others, reflecting the fact that Armenians have been an 'isolated population' throughout centuries. This study is the first comprehensive investigation of HLA-allele group distribution in a subset of Armenian populations, and the first to provide HLA-allele and haplotype frequencies at a high-resolution level. It is a valuable reference for organ transplantation and for future studies of HLA-associated diseases in Armenian populations.

Veritator
17-12-13, 05:24
Patrilocality and recent migrations have little impact on shaping patterns of genetic structure of the Armenian population. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19769303)

Harutyunyan A (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Harutyunyan%20A%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=19769303), Khudoyan A (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Khudoyan%20A%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=19769303), Yepiskoposyan L (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Yepiskoposyan%20L%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=19769303).

Abstract

In general, genetic distances between human populations (also within one ethnic group) are larger for the Y chromosome markers than for the mtDNA. It is usually explained by higher rate of female versus male migration due to the cultural practice of patrilocality, when women move to their husbands' residence after marriage. Recently found a reversed picture for the genetic variation in some ethno-territorial groups confirm the strict role of cultural traditions in shaping patterns of populations' genetic structure. To test the role of patrilocality for the genetic structure of the Armenianpopulation, we compared the Y chromosome and the mtDNA haplotype variations among and between geographical groups identified according to paternal (maternal) grandparental place of birth, from one side, and the populations currently living in the same geographical areas, from the other side. The results demonstrate that the Armenian population is regionally more structured for the Y chromosome than for the mtDNA. Additionally, in spite of expressed directivity of migration processes (caused by the phenomenon of patrilocality as well), the patterns of genetic variations for the populations of the same geographic areas remain without any significant changes during the last three generations.

Kardu
18-12-13, 00:39
That's Caucasian Albania. It may have been.

That's what I said

Brokensword
18-12-13, 01:27
You copy-pasted too much Armenian academics. Not reliable...

Veritator
21-12-13, 16:55
The ethnicity of the Academics has no bearing on the truth of their claims. That's what scientific peer-review is for. What matters is what they can prove, and clearly they were able to. So, clearly they have been judged (already) to be reliable.

Peace365
05-01-14, 18:01
Veritator could you explain that "Analysis of 89 biallelic polymorphisms in 523 Turkish Y chromosomes revealed 52 distinct haplotypes with considerable haplogroup substructure"

when this research has made an which are that 52 districs? could you give any source?

Peace365
05-01-14, 18:03
"The ethnicity of the Academics has no bearing on the truth of their claims."

unfortunatelly its not true,very often its effecting on their claims and conclusions on researches

Peace365
05-01-14, 18:07
"This means most Turks have deep roots in Turkey and are descended from peoples like the Armenians (http://www.khazaria.com/genetics/armenians.html) and the Hittites who once lived in large numbers in that land. "

Hittites?? are they really existed in Anatolia during the Byzantine period? :) by the way how many Turkish people are joined to that so called researches?

cylnlts
03-02-17, 15:48
my origin results
My results by my origin:
Asia Minor % 70
Eastern Middle East %6
Western and central Europe %15
Eastern Europe %3
Northeast Asia %4
Central Asia %3
am I turkısh or Armenian ???

Seanp
03-02-17, 18:26
Based on Gedmatch:

Armenian:

#


Population
Percent


1
Caucasus
49.9


2
Gedrosia
16.98


3
Southwest_Asian
13.96


4
Atlantic_Med
13.02


5
North_European
4.91


6
Northwest_African
0.71


7
East_Asian
0.31


8
East_African
0.2



Single Population Sharing:



#
Population (source)
Distance


1
Armenian (Dodecad)
6.16


2
Armenians_15 (Yunusbayev)
6.74


3
Azerbaijan_Jews (Behar)
6.91


4
Assyrian (Dodecad)
7.19


5
Georgia_Jews (Behar)
7.37


6
Turks (Behar)
8.05


7
Uzbekistan_Jews (Behar)
8.42


8
Turkish (Dodecad)
8.42


9
Armenians (Behar)
10.13


10
Iranian_Jews (Behar)
11.12


11
Iraq_Jews (Behar)
11.94


12
Druze (HGDP)
12.21


13
Cypriots (Behar)
12.97


14
Lebanese (Behar)
13.97


15
Kurds (Yunusbayev)
13.99


16
Kurd (Dodecad)
15.32


17
Iranian (Dodecad)
16.06


18
Syrians (Behar)
17.93


19
Iranians (Behar)
19.02


20
Kumyks (Yunusbayev)
19.95




Armenian 2


#


Population
Percent


1
Caucasus
50.02


2
Gedrosia
16.49


3
Atlantic_Med
15.41


4
Southwest_Asian
14.85


5
North_European
2.36


6
South_Asian
0.27


7
Southeast_Asian
0.25


8
Northwest_African
0.24


9
East_Asian
0.11



Single Population Sharing:



#
Population (source)
Distance


1
Armenian (Dodecad)
7.12


2
Azerbaijan_Jews (Behar)
7.23


3
Assyrian (Dodecad)
7.24


4
Armenians_15 (Yunusbayev)
8.22


5
Georgia_Jews (Behar)
8.67


6
Uzbekistan_Jews (Behar)
9.9


7
Turkish (Dodecad)
10.27


8
Turks (Behar)
10.46


9
Druze (HGDP)
11.24


10
Iranian_Jews (Behar)
11.35


11
Armenians (Behar)
11.35


12
Cypriots (Behar)
11.53


13
Iraq_Jews (Behar)
11.57


14
Lebanese (Behar)
13.85


15
Kurds (Yunusbayev)
15.87


16
Kurd (Dodecad)
17.05


17
Syrians (Behar)
17.49


18
Iranian (Dodecad)
17.79


19
Sephardic_Jews (Behar)
18.99


20
Jordanians (Behar)
19.6




Turkish from Trabzon:

#


Population
Percent


1
Caucasus
57.95


2
Gedrosia
14.45


3
Southwest_Asian
10.94


4
Atlantic_Med
10.89


5
North_European
5.16


6
Northwest_African
0.58


7
South_Asian
0.03



Single Population Sharing:



#
Population (source)
Distance


1
Armenians (Behar)
2.63


2
Armenian (Dodecad)
4.58


3
Armenians_15 (Yunusbayev)
5.3


4
Georgia_Jews (Behar)
9.98


5
Azerbaijan_Jews (Behar)
10.16


6
Assyrian (Dodecad)
10.58


7
Turks (Behar)
12.1


8
Turkish (Dodecad)
12.2


9
Uzbekistan_Jews (Behar)
14.66


10
Iranian_Jews (Behar)
15.24


11
Druze (HGDP)
15.42


12
Cypriots (Behar)
15.64


13
Iraq_Jews (Behar)
16.77


14
Abhkasians (Yunusbayev)
19.02


15
Adygei (HGDP)
19.59


16
Kurds (Yunusbayev)
19.61


17
Lebanese (Behar)
19.88


18
Balkars (Yunusbayev)
19.96


19
North_Ossetians (Yunusbayev)
20.29


20
Kumyks (Yunusbayev)
20.65




Random Turkish from Western part:

#


Population
Percent


1
Caucasus
40.69


2
Gedrosia
15.91


3
Atlantic_Med
15.34


4
Southwest_Asian
11.44


5
North_European
8.31


6
East_Asian
4.17


7
Siberian
2.08


8
Southeast_Asian
1.46


9
Northwest_African
0.32


10
South_Asian
0.27



Single Population Sharing:



#
Population (source)
Distance


1
Turkish (Dodecad)
6.56


2
Turks (Behar)
7.23


3
Uzbekistan_Jews (Behar)
12.84


4
Lebanese (Behar)
15.13


5
Kurds (Yunusbayev)
15.14


6
Kurd (Dodecad)
15.48


7
Cypriots (Behar)
15.61


8
Azerbaijan_Jews (Behar)
15.82


9
Georgia_Jews (Behar)
15.84


10
Iranian (Dodecad)
15.89


11
Armenian (Dodecad)
16.09


12
Assyrian (Dodecad)
16.1


13
Armenians_15 (Yunusbayev)
16.39


14
Sephardic_Jews (Behar)
16.73


15
Ashkenazy_Jews (Behar)
16.87


16
Druze (HGDP)
17.62


17
Iraq_Jews (Behar)
17.85


18
Iranian_Jews (Behar)
17.92


19
Ashkenazi (Dodecad)
17.93


20
Kumyks (Yunusbayev)
18.06