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View Full Version : Slavs or their relatives on the Balkan before V cen.



Jovan
28-11-13, 03:29
Maybe I should have put this thread in linguistics, but idk...

I found many toponyms and names of tribes on the Balkan before the Vth century that have meaning in Macedonian and other slavic languages.

So here we go:

Tribes:
Dardania - Dar means gift and dan means day (ia is common ending)
Bryges - Briga means care
Doberes - Dobar means good

Cities:
Stobi (ancient city in Macedonia) - the word stolb means pillar. The city has many pillars
Byla Zora - Byla is actually vila V-B in english, it could mean like Fairy and zora is morning
Scupi - it has two meanings expensive or gather
Pela - the word bela means white and b is so close to p, actually the same letter but one is sound and the other isn't
Pelagonia - pela is from bela and i don't know how to explain the word goni since there isn't accurate word in english

bicicleur
01-12-13, 12:33
what about the Illyrians, the Thracians or the Dacians?
could they allready have spoken some Slavic language?

Eldritch
01-12-13, 17:37
what about the Illyrians, the Thracians or the Dacians?
could they allready have spoken some Slavic language?
Absolutely not.

MOESAN
07-12-13, 20:39
Maybe I should have put this thread in linguistics, but idk...

I found many toponyms and names of tribes on the Balkan before the Vth century that have meaning in Macedonian and other slavic languages.

So here we go:

Tribes:
Dardania - Dar means gift and dan means day (ia is common ending)
Bryges - Briga means care
Doberes - Dobar means good

Cities:
Stobi (ancient city in Macedonia) - the word stolb means pillar. The city has many pillars
Byla Zora - Byla is actually vila V-B in english, it could mean like Fairy and zora is morning
Scupi - it has two meanings expensive or gather
Pela - the word bela means white and b is so close to p, actually the same letter but one is sound and the other isn't
Pelagonia - pela is from bela and i don't know how to explain the word goni since there isn't accurate word in english

it is legitime to look for ancient common roots in languages but do give a glance to a I-E roots "dictionary" and you 'll see that very close roots (concerning forms) exist in a lot of I-E languages sometimes with striking meanings evolutions (amazing results!) - and concerning phonetic, except for some languages as proto-germanic or armenian, I have some reserves about P-B- connexions at the beginning of words ...
no offense, have a good week-end
*: for bryges the meaning of 'care' is far enough from what I think: the supposed *B-r (or ? *Bh-r?) root has maybe more links to the "height", "mountain" "altesse" meanings or *Bh-r- >> "break" meaning ??? - just a game of bets...