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FBS
13-03-14, 15:06
Interesting to know:

Paris syndrome
Paris syndrome is a transient experience that affects tourists to Paris who find that the City of Light does not live up to their expectations. They may experience hallucinations, delusions of persecution, anxiety and other somatic symptoms. Paris syndrome may sound like a joke, but around twenty Japanese tourists a year are thought to be hospitalised with it. Some think it is brought on by culture shock, as the Japanese have a particularly idealised view of Paris. The usual treatment for Paris syndrome is to go home.

Jerusalem syndrome
Paris does not have the monopoly on causing visitors to be struck down by mental illness.

Some visitors to Jerusalem can become obsessed with the city after arriving.
Those experiencing the syndrome may suffer from anxiety, start wearing a toga, begin singing hymns or shouting out verses from the Bible.
Some even begin giving poorly practised sermons in public.
Estimates place the number of people who require hospital admission from this syndrome at around 40 per year.
As for Paris syndrome, the normal treatment is to go home.

The other 10 are in this link:http://www.spring.org.uk/2014/03/12-most-mind-blowing-mental-delusions-and-syndromes.php

Angela
15-03-14, 21:20
Interesting to know:

Paris syndrome
Paris syndrome is a transient experience that affects tourists to Paris who find that the City of Light does not live up to their expectations. They may experience hallucinations, delusions of persecution, anxiety and other somatic symptoms. Paris syndrome may sound like a joke, but around twenty Japanese tourists a year are thought to be hospitalised with it. Some think it is brought on by culture shock, as the Japanese have a particularly idealised view of Paris. The usual treatment for Paris syndrome is to go home.

Jerusalem syndrome
Paris does not have the monopoly on causing visitors to be struck down by mental illness.

Some visitors to Jerusalem can become obsessed with the city after arriving.
Those experiencing the syndrome may suffer from anxiety, start wearing a toga, begin singing hymns or shouting out verses from the Bible.
Some even begin giving poorly practised sermons in public.
Estimates place the number of people who require hospital admission from this syndrome at around 40 per year.
As for Paris syndrome, the normal treatment is to go home.

The other 10 are in this link:http://www.spring.org.uk/2014/03/12-most-mind-blowing-mental-delusions-and-syndromes.php

That was very interesting, but don't you think that the Paris Syndrome and the Jerusalem syndrome are of a different kind than the other syndromes listed in the link?

Well, at least the Paris Syndrome...it reminds me a lot of the Stendahl Syndrome.

From Wiki:
Stendhal syndrome, Stendhal's syndrome, hyperkulturemia, or Florence syndrome is a psychosomatic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosomatic) disorder that causes rapid heartbeat, dizziness, fainting, confusion and even hallucinations (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hallucination) when an individual is exposed to an experience of great personal significance, particularly viewing art (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art).[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stendhal_syndrome#cite_note-1)

The illness is named after the famous 19th-century French author Stendhal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stendhal) (pseudonym of Henri-Marie Beyle), who described his experience with the phenomenon during his 1817 visit to Florence (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence) in his book Naples and Florence: A Journey from Milan to Reggio.
When he visited the Basilica of Santa Croce (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basilica_of_Santa_Croce,_Florence), where Niccolò Machiavelli (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niccol%C3%B2_Machiavelli), Michelangelo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelangelo) and Galileo Galilei (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_Galilei) are buried, he saw Giotto (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giotto)'s frescoes for the first time and was overcome with emotion. He wrote "I was in a sort of ecstasy, from the idea of being in Florence, close to the great men whose tombs I had seen. Absorbed in the contemplation of sublime beauty... I reached the point where one encounters celestial sensations... Everything spoke so vividly to my soul. Ah, if I could only forget. I had palpitations of the heart (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stendhal_syndrome#), what in Berlin they call 'nerves.' Life was drained from me. I walked with the fear of falling."[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stendhal_syndrome#cite_note-2)

Believe it or not, it is a documented disorder for which people seek treatment. In this year's Oscar winner for best foreign film, The Great Beauty, the opening scene is of a Japanese tourist who falls prey to it while viewing the architecture of Rome, and falls dead from a heart attack. Black humor, and very symbolic in terms of the movie, which on one of many levels is about how most Italians no longer really see the beauty.

FBS
16-03-14, 00:07
Thanks for the input. It is interesting to know. The list that I have given the link to has different types of syndromes and delusions. Those two just seemed very unusual to me so I decided to share. I for eg was not enchanted by Rome but I simply loved Ravelo. So Rome I guess had the similar effect on me like Paris on Japanese:laughing:, I had to much of expectations. I did not need to go to hospital or home though...

Angela
16-03-14, 01:55
Thanks for the input. It is interesting to know. The list that I have given the link to has different types of syndromes and delusions. Those two just seemed very unusual to me so I decided to share. I for eg was not enchanted by Rome but I simply loved Ravelo. So Rome I guess had the similar effect on me like Paris on Japanese:laughing:, I had to much of expectations. I did not need to go to hospital or home though...

Ravello is one of my favorites too...perhaps you liked it because you went here...

I was looking for a video I've seen before, but found this recent one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mTVaRod0wM

I love this guy...God bless the English for what they have done to preserve and enhance some of Italy's treasures. The relationship between the two countries has not always been ideal, but credit must be given. Some of them know more about Italy than do the natives...I tell my American friends to forget all the Fodor's and those things, and pick up the Cadogan guides.

I once said that if I only had a couple of months to live, I would spend some of that time at the Villa Ciambrone...there, perhaps at my favorite hotel on Capri, or Portofino, or Fiesole...a morbid thought, right? :smile: I have to have won the Lotto by that time, however, as I would want to rent out the whole place. As Greta Garbo said, "I want to be alone"...well, almost alone.

I have to say that I am impressed by the sensibility of the Japanese to art and architecture and the beauties of western civilization in general, although some of them obviously take it too far. Unkind of the director to highlight them in that way, however.

FBS
17-03-14, 12:22
Well I guess it depends from the precepts that we have about a place that makes us react in certain ways. As per Ravello I wouldn't mind spending the rest of my life in such a place, being above the clouds while dining is just marvelous and breathtaking. Indescribable.