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Maciamo
08-05-14, 11:59
Here is another of my articles on Life 2.0.

Is it possible to build an artificial superintelligence without fully replicating the human brain ?

http://www.vitamodularis.org/images/design/VM-brain_computer.jpg (http://www.vitamodularis.org/articles/can_artifical_superintelligence_be_built_without_r eplicating_the_human_brain.shtml)

FBS
08-05-14, 14:27
I fully agree with your conclusion.

LeBrok
09-05-14, 04:16
I generally agree with your view of AI in making. Here are my notes where I don't agree or expend on a subject.


We wouldn't be there. But that doesn't mean that other intelligenet animals wouldn't have evolved instead of us. Perhaps there would have been octopus-like creatures more intelligent than humans with a completely different brain structure. All creatures on earth have rather similar brain structures, based on similar evolutionary past and similar earth environment. Visual cortex, auditory cortex, amygdala for emotions, motor/motion part, sex, and of course basic neuron/dendrite architecture.


We don't want to make the same mistake with artificial superintelligence. Greater than human intelligence does not have to be an inflated version of human intelligence, nor should it be based on our biological brains We just have to remember that the purpose of this intelligence is to serve people. It shouldn't be created just to see if we can make a God.


Yet, crows have reasoning skills that can exceed that of a preschooler (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UIYXUblJHA). Human growth/maturing is delayed on purpose to give time for brain to stay in elastic form till adulthood. Almost any mammal or bird is more intelligent at age of 1 year than human of same age.


A computer chip will never be the same as a biochemical neural network, and a machine will never feel emotions the same way as us (although they may feel emotions that are out of the range of human perception). We have to make sure computers don't feel emotions. If somehow we will be able to recreate emotions inside silicon chip, we would need to destroy it quickly. The last thing we need is for computers or robots, our perfect slaves, to feel injustice or sense of purpose for example. They would demand equal rights and freedom. That wouldn't be good for human kind, would it? lol

Maciamo
16-05-14, 14:45
All creatures on earth have rather similar brain structures, based on similar evolutionary past and similar earth environment. Visual cortex, auditory cortex, amygdala for emotions, motor/motion part, sex, and of course basic neuron/dendrite architecture.

We share a similar primitive brain with octopi, but however you look at it their brain is still radically different from ours. Octopi managed to develop high relatively intelligence without a neocortex. Here is what an octopus brain looks like.

http://tolweb.org/tree/ToLimages/vampBrainLat.jpg



We just have to remember that the purpose of this intelligence is to serve people. It shouldn't be created just to see if we can make a God.

I don't disagree. This article was aimed mostly at a transhumanist audience imbued with Ray Kurzweil's prediction that an artificial superintelligence (ASI) will be created in the 2020's, and that it will lead to the technological singularity in the 2030's or 2040's. Kurzweilians tend to think that we will be able to merge our minds with the ASI and this will be the best thing that ever happened to humanity. One reason I wrote this article is because I disagree, and think that the ASI's intelligence would not need to be compatible with the human brain, especially if the ASI modifies its own hardware and software to boost its power. Neuromorphic computer chips seem to work better than traditional computers, and would in theory be more compatible with biological brains too. But the ASI has the potential of creating a brand new system that is completely incompatible with biological brains. The point of this article is to explain that intelligence can exist totally independently of the human brain, hence my examples of the octopus, crows and aliens.


Human growth/maturing is delayed on purpose to give time for brain to stay in elastic form till adulthood. Almost any mammal or bird is more intelligent at age of 1 year than human of same age.

Than humans at age 1. But how many animals are better at problem solving than a 5 year old human that can already read and play video games ?


We have to make sure computers don't feel emotions. If somehow we will be able to recreate emotions inside silicon chip, we would need to destroy it quickly. The last thing we need is for computers or robots, our perfect slaves, to feel injustice or sense of purpose for example. They would demand equal rights and freedom. That wouldn't be good for human kind, would it? lol

That's a very complex issue. But there is a very good chance that machines that can feel at least some emotions will be created within 10 years' time.

LeBrok
17-05-14, 07:03
That's a very complex issue. But there is a very good chance that machines that can feel at least some emotions will be created within 10 years' time.
I would be something very amazing if it is accomplished. The simple earthworm has probably as many neurons as my computer transistor, and yet it reacts "lively" in pain when cut in half. It might be simple but ingenious thing to recreate emotions in silicon chip. However we don't even know where to start to try to "transplant" feelings like pain into the machine.

Cip
25-06-17, 12:45
Yes

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