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John Doe
02-06-14, 16:35
My paternal haplogroup is E1b1b1, but 23andme doesn't say much about it, it just says that it's predecessor, E1b1b has an East African source, and that it's most common in North Africa and Southern Europe and that the example populations are Berbers, Greeks, Albanians and Ashkenazis. Anyone knows more about this haplogroup? :confused2:

John Doe
02-06-14, 16:37
BTW my haplogroup is E1b1b1 (M35) if that helps.

LeBrok
02-06-14, 17:02
Welcome to Eupedia John.
Go to Genetics section of Eupedia and check Maciamo's research and articles.
http://www.eupedia.com/genetics/

Here is about E1b1b
http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_E1b1b_Y-DNA.shtml

John Doe
03-06-14, 10:23
Thanks, that's very nice of you.
Thanks for the link. :)

John Doe
03-06-14, 11:02
I looked for information on E1b1b1 with the defining mutation of M35 on the link you gave me but unfortunately I didn't find any info on that, thanks anyway, and thank you. :)

Sile
03-06-14, 12:47
I looked for information on E1b1b1 with the defining mutation of M35 on the link you gave me but unfortunately I didn't find any info on that, thanks anyway, and thank you. :)

there you go

http://www.isogg.org/tree/ISOGG_HapgrpE.html

plenty SNPs and also reading material at bottom

John Doe
03-06-14, 13:43
Thanks. :)

John Doe
03-06-14, 13:50
So it according to ISOGG 2014 Y-DNA the clusters of E1b1b1 (the haplogroup I belong to) are seen today in Western Europe, Southeast Europe, the Near East, Northeast Africa and Northwest Africa. This brings up a question, if the clusters (or subclades, correct me if I'm wrong) of E1b1b1 are most common to day in Western Europe, Southeast Europe, the Near East, Northeast Africa and Northwest Africa, where is E1b1b1, not it's subclades most common in the world, and where did it originate? According to 23andme the latest mutation of my paternal haplogroup is identified as "M35", where is E1b1b1 M35 most common throughout the world today and where did it originate? If I got it wrong and E1b1b1 is most common in the regions I mentioned twice then feel free to correct me. :)

Dalmat
03-06-14, 13:59
i think horn of africa

http://www.stclairresearch.com/images/pathE1b1.jpg

John Doe
03-06-14, 14:39
Thanks mate. :)

So... Northeastern Sudan, interesting... Do you have any idea where it's most common today/500 years ago?

Dalmat
03-06-14, 14:46
Thanks mate. :)

So... Northeastern Sudan, interesting... Do you have any idea where it's most common today/500 years ago?

E hgs seems to be concetrated most on coastline around mediteran sea, so north africa, southern europe, and east mediteran


As a Jew you fit right into its domain

John Doe
03-06-14, 15:28
That makes sense, I always get mainly Southern European (Atlantic, West med etc) and Middle Eastern ancestry (East Med, west Asian etc) on many Gedmatch calculators and I always share closest genetic similarities with Italians and Greeks when it comes to non Jews. Thanks. :)

albanopolis
03-06-14, 15:36
i think horn of africa

http://www.stclairresearch.com/images/pathE1b1.jpg
I think the birthplace of Ev-13 is not Levant where you have pointed it is. If not Bosnia I think its Greece where all subclades of Ev-13 are present. Ev-13 in Levant is Greek and Roman conquests.

noUseForAname
29-09-14, 04:54
BTW my haplogroup is E1b1b1 (M35) if that helps.

Hi John,
Very interesting have you got it more specific except E1b1b1 (M35)?....i think Berbers have not the same subclades with Greeks and Albanians
as far as i know Greeks and Albanians have E-V13 and it shows it has minimal % in north Africa so to Berbers.

Haplogroup E-V13 is the only lineage that reaches the highest frequencies out of Africa. In fact, it represents about 85% of the European E-M78 chromosomes with a clinal pattern of frequency distribution from the southern Balkan peninsula (19.6%) to western Europe (2.5%). The same haplogroup is also present at lower frequencies in Anatolia (3.8%), the Near East (2.0%), and the Caucasus (1.8%). In Africa, haplogroup E-V13 is rare, being observed only in northern Africa at a low frequency (0.9%).
—Cruciani et al. (2007 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_E-V68#CITEREFCrucianiLa_FrattaTrombettaSantolamazza2 007))

In contrast, another major discovery relevant to the study of E-V13 origins was the announcement in Lacan et al. (2011 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_E-V68#CITEREFLacanKayserRicautBrucato2011)) that a 7000 year old skeleton in a Neolithic context in a Spanish funeral cave, was an E-V13 man. (The other specimens tested from the same site were in haplogroup G2a (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Haplogroup_G2a_(Y-DNA)&action=edit&redlink=1), which has been found in Neolithic contexts throughout Europe.) Using 7 STR markers, this specimen was identified as being similar to modern individuals tested in Albania, Bosnia, Greece, Corsica, and Provence. The authors therefore proposed that, whether or not the modern distribution of E-V13 of today is a result of more recent events, E-V13 was already in Europe within the Neolithic, carried by early farmers from the Eastern Mediterranean to the Western Mediterranean, much earlier than the Bronze age.
Speculations about his look….
http://www.livescience.com/42838-european-hunter-gatherer-genome-sequenced.html

Y haplogroup E1b1b (E-M35) in the modern Balkan population is dominated by its sub-clade E1b1b1a (E-M78) and specifically by the most common European sub-clade of E-M78, E-V13.[68] The area in and around Albanian speaking regions has the highest known percentages E-V13 in the world, and it is thought that the majority of E-V13 in Europe and elsewhere descend from a common ancestor who lived in the Balkans in the late Mesolithic or Neolithic, and that men of this lineage began to spread outside the Balkans as early as the Neolithic, or even as recently as the Roman era.[68][69][70][71][72][73]

i think this might help
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_E-V68#CITEREFLacanKayserRicautBrucato2011

John Doe
29-09-14, 11:15
Hi John,
Very interesting have you got it more specific except E1b1b1 (M35)?....i think Berbers have not the same subclades with Greeks and Albanians
as far as i know Greeks and Albanians have E-V13 and it shows it has minimal % in north Africa so to Berbers.

Haplogroup E-V13 is the only lineage that reaches the highest frequencies out of Africa. In fact, it represents about 85% of the European E-M78 chromosomes with a clinal pattern of frequency distribution from the southern Balkan peninsula (19.6%) to western Europe (2.5%). The same haplogroup is also present at lower frequencies in Anatolia (3.8%), the Near East (2.0%), and the Caucasus (1.8%). In Africa, haplogroup E-V13 is rare, being observed only in northern Africa at a low frequency (0.9%).
—Cruciani et al. (2007 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_E-V68#CITEREFCrucianiLa_FrattaTrombettaSantolamazza2 007))

In contrast, another major discovery relevant to the study of E-V13 origins was the announcement in Lacan et al. (2011 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_E-V68#CITEREFLacanKayserRicautBrucato2011)) that a 7000 year old skeleton in a Neolithic context in a Spanish funeral cave, was an E-V13 man. (The other specimens tested from the same site were in haplogroup G2a (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Haplogroup_G2a_(Y-DNA)&action=edit&redlink=1), which has been found in Neolithic contexts throughout Europe.) Using 7 STR markers, this specimen was identified as being similar to modern individuals tested in Albania, Bosnia, Greece, Corsica, and Provence. The authors therefore proposed that, whether or not the modern distribution of E-V13 of today is a result of more recent events, E-V13 was already in Europe within the Neolithic, carried by early farmers from the Eastern Mediterranean to the Western Mediterranean, much earlier than the Bronze age.
Speculations about his look….
http://www.livescience.com/42838-european-hunter-gatherer-genome-sequenced.html

Y haplogroup E1b1b (E-M35) in the modern Balkan population is dominated by its sub-clade E1b1b1a (E-M78) and specifically by the most common European sub-clade of E-M78, E-V13.[68] The area in and around Albanian speaking regions has the highest known percentages E-V13 in the world, and it is thought that the majority of E-V13 in Europe and elsewhere descend from a common ancestor who lived in the Balkans in the late Mesolithic or Neolithic, and that men of this lineage began to spread outside the Balkans as early as the Neolithic, or even as recently as the Roman era.[68][69][70][71][72][73]

i think this might help
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_E-V68#CITEREFLacanKayserRicautBrucato2011

Very interesting info. Thanks. Unfortunately I don't know which branch of M35 I belong to.