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LeBrok
26-08-14, 07:41
http://i.imgur.com/S163PNu.gif
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/19/tipping-around-the-world_n_3779911.html

LeBrok
26-08-14, 07:43
http://dailyinfographic.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/110302-MINT-TIPSa.png
http://dailyinfographic.com/tipping-etiquette-around-the-world-infographic

Aberdeen
26-08-14, 17:13
Thanks for the info, LeBrok. Many of us learned what's expected in different countries by getting it wrong and seeing the reaction of the locals. Knowing in advance is better.

hope
26-08-14, 17:21
So no tipping in East Asia, for the most. I wonder if it is because they see their service as a team effort? I`m sure my friend did tip when in China, perhaps it is okay in certain places?

LeBrok
27-08-14, 02:07
So no tipping in East Asia, for the most. I wonder if it is because they see their service as a team effort? I`m sure my friend did tip when in China, perhaps it is okay in certain places?
In big centers full of western tourists the attitude towards tipping changed, I suppose.

Maciamo
27-08-14, 07:26
Thanks for posting this, LeBrok.

I would say that the first map is wrong regarding at least Belgium and France, where tipping is uncommon or done in limited circumstances. This is because service is restaurants is always included in the bill by law. The only circustance I can think of in which people may round up the bill is in case of having food from a restaurant delivered to one's home. But even this is uncommon as people often pay in advance by credit card when they order, so there is nothing to round up. In my experience delivery is usually so slow (expect 2 hours from the time you order in most Indian restaurants, for instance) that often one doesn't wish to tip.

Maciamo
27-08-14, 07:30
So no tipping in East Asia, for the most. I wonder if it is because they see their service as a team effort? I`m sure my friend did tip when in China, perhaps it is okay in certain places?

Having lived in East Asia and knowing particularly well Japanese culture and mindset, I can say that people don't like to tip because:

1) Service is always included by law.
2) Service in Japan is always impeccable, so there is no need of extra incentive like tipping.
3) Tipping is a subjective act, which causes unnecessary worrying about how much one should tip. It's just easier not to have to think about it.

If you try leaving a tip on the table in a restaurant in Japan (as many Americans do), the staff will fetch you on your way out to return the money that "you forgot" on the table. (That's not a joke, you can try it. I am pretty sure Japanese staff will do it anywhere in the country 99% of the time)

LeBrok
27-08-14, 07:42
Thanks for posting this, LeBrok.

I would say that the first map is wrong regarding at least Belgium and France, where tipping is uncommon or done in limited circumstances. This is because service is restaurants is always included in the bill by law. The only circustance I can think of in which people may round up the bill is in case of having food from a restaurant delivered to one's home. But even this is uncommon as people often pay in advance by credit card when they order, so there is nothing to round up. In my experience delivery is usually so slow (expect 2 hours from the time you order in most Indian restaurants, for instance) that often one doesn't wish to tip.
I was surprised to see how many countries made tipping a compulsory extra service charge by law. I like tips to be left out as discretionary gratitude from a happy client, than rather a state telling you that you need to be thankful. It is a very socialistic approach to tell people to be always thankful for a service, lol.

hope
27-08-14, 14:47
Having lived in East Asia and knowing particularly well Japanese culture and mindset, I can say that people don't like to tip because:

1) Service is always included by law.
2) Service in Japan is always impeccable, so there is no need of extra incentive like tipping.
3) Tipping is a subjective act, which causes unnecessary worrying about how much one should tip. It's just easier not to have to think about it.

If you try leaving a tip on the table in a restaurant in Japan (as many Americans do), the staff will fetch you on your way out to return the money that "you forgot" on the table. (That's not a joke, you can try it. I am pretty sure Japanese staff will do it anywhere in the country 99% of the time)
Actually Maciamo, it is odd but your last statement almost echoes something I read online several years ago. I am not quite sure what it was in connection to [ not tipping] but some-one had written they left a tip on table,just slightly under plate, in a Japanese establishment, and before they got to door, their waiter did in fact, as you have said, rush up to say they had left some of their change on the table. Despite trying to say it was for service, the waiter was quite persuaded it was their forgotten change. Your post now explains the reason why.

FrankN
27-08-14, 16:21
The way I learnt it for Germany (but it also seems to apply to many other European countries) is that you may, even should, tip off staff, but never the restaurant owner - that would be an insult! So, if you go to your friendly family-run German, Italian, Greek or Chinese restaurant around the corner, you don't tip, unless you are sure the waiter is not the owner or one of his relatives.

In a restaurant chain, you of course tip. German waiters usually receive a very low salary (only minimum wage), and expect to make some extra money on the tips (which is, btw, tax-free for them). If the food is really nice, I sometimes also give some tip especially to the cooks (they also don't receive much salary). Several restaurants anyway have a policy of collecting all tips, and sharing it among the serving and cooking staff. The rule is up to 10% tip, but if you round up to a reasonable amount (not only 1-2 Euros), it is fine. When the service is lousy or late, I usually give a tip of 5-10 cents, to signal that I haven't forgotten tipping but that the service provided wasn't worth any more..

SE Asia is quite special. Many Japanese businesses (also Japanese-run hotels outside of Japan, e.g. in Indonesia) have a "no tips" policy. If tips are welcome, some restaurants will either provide you the change in very small coins/notes, or round up automatically (you can still ask for the money that is missing, they will hand it out a bit reluctantly).

Angela
27-08-14, 17:51
I feel guilty for saying so, as I made a ton of money from tips when I worked in my uncle's restaurant during college, but I don't like the whole tipping thing. I like the service charge system. That way you know ahead of time what something will cost. For really exceptional service you can then give something a little extra. Even from the service provider's point of view, at least you don't get stiffed by some cheap so and so...If the service is really bad, report it to the owner or floor manager. The second time it happens, just don't go back.

Was it the Americans who brought about some of this change in Europe?

LeBrok
28-08-14, 01:16
I feel guilty for saying so, as I made a ton of money from tips when I worked in my uncle's restaurant during college, but I don't like the whole tipping thing. I like the service charge system. That way you know ahead of time what something will cost. For really exceptional service you can then give something a little extra. Even from the service provider's point of view, at least you don't get stiffed by some cheap so and so...If the service is really bad, report it to the owner or floor manager. The second time it happens, just don't go back.

Was it the Americans who brought about some of this change in Europe?
Could be. From surveys above looks like Americans are the biggest tippers in the world. .....of course right behind Canadians. :D

LeBrok
28-08-14, 02:51
In a restaurant chain, you of course tip. German waiters usually receive a very low salary (only minimum wage), and expect to make some extra money on the tips (which is, btw, tax-free for them).

In Canada tips are taxed. Service people have obligation to include tips for Income Tax purposes. If tip is in cash government have a little chance to find out about it, but recently most of tips are paid through credit and debit cards, so it is imposible to hide it.




When the service is lousy or late, I usually give a tip of 5-10 cents, to signal that I haven't forgotten tipping but that the service provided wasn't worth any more..
That's a great tip (pun intended). I never knew how to let people know inconspicuous way that their service sucked in.

LeBrok
28-08-14, 03:01
SE Asia is quite special. Many Japanese businesses (also Japanese-run hotels outside of Japan, e.g. in Indonesia) have a "no tips" policy. That's probably a subject needing its own thread. If it comes to money Japanese are very secretive, shameful and touchy, or perhaps they posing as such for others to see. Typical Japanese will never ever ask for a pay rise and will sit at work after house to show how much they care about company. It is not that they don't want to make more money or they work hard after hours it is more about a custom, culture in general, or simple posing.

kamani
28-08-14, 04:05
I tip 13% even if the service is bad. No 15-20% because I know tipping is just a shameless ploy to keep paying waiters miniumum wage. The more you tip them, the lower their wages are going to be.