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View Full Version : Possibility of modern/recent hominid sightings?



Power77
17-10-14, 22:49
I was wondering about it after reading Maciamo's thread about Neanderthals:http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/24893-Do-modern-Europeans-partly-descend-from-Neanderthal. In this thread, he mentions the story of Zana in Georgia a supposed hominid female(related to Neanderthal according to Maciamo)who's been captured in the late 19th century and got impregnated thus gave birth to a boy(Khwi) and a girl(Can't remember her name). According to some sources, her descendants still live in Georgia. Considering that many places in either cold(Caucasus, Himalayas, Siberia) or subtropical(Insular Southeast Asia, African jungles) places remain relatively unexplored is it possible for some hominid descendants to still thrive in the wild unnoticed by the rest of the population? Share.

oreo_cookie
22-11-14, 03:36
If so it'd probably be on isolated Pacific islands, or somewhere in Papua New Guinea; there are parts of the country that have not been explored, or where they believe the native population has not had any contact with the outside world.

I am sure there might be uncharted Pacific islands also.

LeBrok
22-11-14, 04:00
I am sure there might be uncharted Pacific islands also. Where have you been in last 50 years? We have satellites now making a detailed pictures of entire earth with resolution good enough to read licence plates. Even on low resolution google maps, accessible by everyone, you can see cars on roads, and you think there is an island in the ocean we don't know about.
What can we say if in US, country over 300 million people, there might be a Bigfoot still eluding all the smartphone cameras.
People get real, there are no more hominids to be discovered on this planet. Unless through archeology, of the ones who lived way back.

oreo_cookie
23-11-14, 05:29
Where have you been in last 50 years? We have satellites now making a detailed pictures of entire earth with resolution good enough to read licence plates. Even on low resolution google maps, accessible by everyone, you can see cars on roads, and you think there is an island in the ocean we don't know about. .

Well even if we knew a group of people existed that we have no contact with, we wouldn't have a means of telling their features or genetics, if they live isolated inland in unexplored areas.

LeBrok
23-11-14, 07:01
Well even if we knew a group of people existed that we have no contact with, we wouldn't have a means of telling their features or genetics, if they live isolated inland in unexplored areas. We have contact with all human groups, and there is no unexplored area on Earth. All we can find as new species are smaller animals, especially bugs and bacteria, and in deep ocean.
Do you know about new tribes that were discovered in last decades?
We don't have genetics of many small tribes, as some are protected or avoiding contacts with outsiders. However, local authorities know about existence of all the tribes in their jurisdiction.

oreo_cookie
01-12-14, 07:47
Maybe you're right. I just wonder, because we have not genetically tested every isolated group of people, so we don't know if any ancient genes have been preserved that we did not know of. I know they say Papuans and Andamanese preserve Denisovan genes better than anyone else, as well as some people deep in south India.