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Angela
22-11-14, 18:24
Mother's Soothing Presence Changes Gene Activity in Brains of Infants in Pain:

See:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141118125432.htm

Who knew that when you say let mommy kiss the boo-boo and it will go away there was an element of truth in it?

Maleth
23-11-14, 19:21
Mother's Soothing Presence Changes Gene Activity in Brains of Infants in Pain:

See:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141118125432.htm

Who knew that when you say let mommy kiss the boo-boo and it will go away there was an element of truth in it?

So true. I wonder if the Infant will have the same effect and influence with an adoptive mum? and can a daddy have the same effect in the absence of a mum (say mum passing away after birth or going through a phase of baby blues). All realities of life.

Ike
23-11-14, 20:48
What's TLC?

Angela
24-11-14, 02:01
So true. I wonder if the Infant will have the same effect and influence with an adoptive mum? and can a daddy have the same effect in the absence of a mum (say mum passing away after birth or going through a phase of baby blues). All realities of life.

I would doubt that a biological relationship has much to do with it, at least after the first few days. I think they respond to the "caregiver's" voice, and even smell, which they associate with food, and warmth, and comfort. I do think I read somewhere that infants seem to be rather hard wired to respond to high pitched voices. That said, I've seen fathers with a very deft touch with infants, and a very soothing, calm presence and voice. I've also seen a few mothers who just weren't cut out for the job...it's not that common, in my experience, but it happens.

Basically, I think it comes down to tenderness. Who can resist it, of whatever age? Who doesn't feel better when you're the recipient?

@Ike
TLC means tender, loving, care.

Maleth
25-11-14, 11:34
I would doubt that a biological relationship has much to do with it, at least after the first few days. I think they respond to the "caregiver's" voice, and even smell, which they associate with food, and warmth, and comfort. I do think I read somewhere that infants seem to be rather hard wired to respond to high pitched voices. That said, I've seen fathers with a very deft touch with infants, and a very soothing, calm presence and voice. I've also seen a few mothers who just weren't cut out for the job...it's not that common, in my experience, but it happens.

Basically, I think it comes down to tenderness. Who can resist it, of whatever age? Who doesn't feel better when you're the recipient?



Agreed.

(sorry to post this but it just reminded me of this thread but the opposite of course... but never the less an extreme exception but never the less a reality of life and can happen anywhere http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-30170796 ) :too_sad:

Mars
25-11-14, 17:07
Mother's Soothing Presence Changes Gene Activity in Brains of Infants in Pain:

See:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141118125432.htm

Who knew that when you say let mommy kiss the boo-boo and it will go away there was an element of truth in it?
The italian translation of boo-boo is "bua". Almost identical... What about other languages?

LeBrok
25-11-14, 18:08
The italian translation of boo-boo is "bua". Almost identical... What about other languages?

koo-koo in Polish (kuku)

Maleth
25-11-14, 18:21
The italian translation of boo-boo is "bua". Almost identical... What about other languages?

Mim Mi in Maltese

Maciamo
26-11-14, 08:05
The italian translation of boo-boo is "bua". Almost identical... What about other languages?

Boh-boh in French.

Angela
26-11-14, 15:24
Agreed.

(sorry to post this but it just reminded me of this thread but the opposite of course... but never the less an extreme exception but never the less a reality of life and can happen anywhere http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-30170796 ) http://cdn.eupedia.com/forum/images/smilies/big/too_sad.gif


It does happen all over the world, often out of extreme shame over the pregnancy, or sometimes out of psychiatric disturbance, whether through the rush of pregnancy hormones or because of an underlying condition or both. Some jurisdictions have tried to deal with the problem by designating a hospital or clinic as a sort of "drop off" center where no questions are asked. It's to fill the same sort of role once filled by orphanages or churches.

There are neglectful mothers too, particularly if drugs or alcohol are involved. Of such women, my mother used to say, "even cats are better mothers."

I do think that there is a biological, hormonal drive in the vast majority of women to have and nurture children, and it can attack even women who weren't necessarily the type who played with baby dolls constantly as children. I call it "baby hunger." http://cdn.eupedia.com/forum/images/smilies/main/smile.gif Then there's the fact that the bond is amplified by the experience of carrying a child for nine months and then going through the birth process. That doesn't mean they're all great at it, or that they're all equally self-sacrificing, or that psychiatric or emotional or drug fueled problems can't impact their choices or behavior. Even competing cultural imperatives can impact their behavior. To some extent you learn "mothering", as you learn a lot of things, from observing it.