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View Full Version : Celtic heritage in a Small town (vettones, Caceres, Spain) (video)



Ziober
17-01-15, 14:39
Cultural legacy and vetton-roman conflict performance in a small village in Salamanca, Castilla, Spain. Music; Spanish and irish Neo-celtic music;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QcUbZ2aDxn8 Edited; this town is placed in Salamanca, not caceres, sorry...

Ziober
17-01-15, 15:00
Vetton archeological and cultural legacy in Jerte's Valley (Salamanca, Avila and caceres, Spain);
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g55u_RMDjeM

bicicleur
17-01-15, 16:06
how long did they resist the Romans?
did they join Hannibal before?

Ziober
17-01-15, 17:10
how long did they resist the Romans?
did they join Hannibal before?
Sincerely I don't know Bicicleur. What I know is regarding a strong resistance over more than 50 years in Numantia (Numancia, Soria) A celtiberian opidum surrounded by at least 5 roman battle camps in hills as Numantia was founded. Thank for your question. Edited (add info); I think Hannibal had not entering as western as vettons lived. The leader of the ally between lusitans and vettons was Viriato I had thougt.

Ziober
17-01-15, 18:19
Cultural legacy and vetton-roman conflict performance in a small village in Salamanca, Castilla, Spain. Music; Spanish and irish Neo-celtic music; Edited; this town is placed in Salamanca, not caceres, sorry... Another video from the same town:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94VtSwY83Y0

Aberdeen
18-01-15, 16:14
Celts in an isolated village who resisted the Romans for a long time? I wonder if these people are related to Astrix and his friends.

Ziober
18-01-15, 17:57
Celts in an isolated village who resisted the Romans for a long time? I wonder if these people are related to Astrix and his friends.
Exactly Aberdeen, as Asterix and friends. The videos regarding to small village, I haven't mentioned Numantia in these videos. Numantia was an opidum with about 4000-8000 soldiers, whose inhabitants resisted around 50 years: http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/txumi_ledauno/numantiaatwar_zps4374c0d4.jpg
Pic from this website: http://www.academia.edu/2058522/New_Model_Legion._The_archaeology_of_Roman_camps_a t_Numantia

Ziober
18-01-15, 18:25
Further info here: http://www4.uwm.edu/celtic/ekeltoi/volumes/vol6/6_2/gorbea_lorrio_6_2.html

bicicleur
18-01-15, 19:40
how did they do this? did they use the same fighting tactics as the well-trained Roman legions?

Ziober
18-01-15, 20:52
how did they do this? did they use the same fighting tactics as the well-trained Roman legions? Absolutely not bicicleur. They just were celtiberians and they prefer suicide than surrender as slaves.

bicicleur
18-01-15, 22:23
many Celts prefered to die rather than being enslaved
but they didn't stop Romans for 50 years
they went into battle to hastily and unorganized

Ziober
19-01-15, 00:01
many Celts prefered to die rather than being enslaved
but they didn't stop Romans for 50 years
they went into battle to hastily and unorganizedMany people haven't known that Iberia probably had had the largest celtic population in a current nation. Edited to add video; I have open a thread with a very explicit documental about: http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/30808-Galician-celts-documental-Arquit-trade-customs-(Spanish-audio-Swedish-subtitles)

Ziober
19-01-15, 07:48
So this is the arts and entertainment subforum, lets we see this galician or Gael-ician dances (Galicia, Spain):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSZcP_ed60E

Ziober
19-01-15, 08:02
And this version of " Munheira de Chantada (better quality sound). Carlos nuñez (galician wind musician) and the Chieftains:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJ1ynTMUj0c

Mars
19-01-15, 14:00
Sincerely I don't know Bicicleur. What I know is regarding a strong resistance over more than 50 years in Numantia (Numancia, Soria) A celtiberian opidum surrounded by at least 5 roman battle camps in hills as Numantia was founded. Thank for your question. Edited (add info); I think Hannibal had not entering as western as vettons lived. The leader of the ally between lusitans and vettons was Viriato I had thougt.
Romans usually encountered strong resistance in area covered with woods, and/or mountains. The ligures, too, fought them for a long time, especially the tribes living in the Appenine regions. Roman soldiers feared their ability in ambushes. Curiously, 2000 years later, the partisan brigades which fought nazi and fascist troops in the same places, adopted similar guerilla tactics, though obviously "modernized".

Angela
19-01-15, 17:03
Romans usually encountered strong resistance in area covered with woods, and/or mountains. The ligures, too, fought them for a long time, especially the tribes living in the Appenine regions. Roman soldiers feared their ability in ambushes. Curiously, 2000 years later, the partisan brigades which fought nazi and fascist troops in the same places, adopted similar guerilla tactics, though obviously "modernized".


Indeed. Nothing much changes in terms of the essentials of warfare and conquest. "Guerrilla" fighters can hold out in mountains or forests or swamps and engage in hit and run attacks for a long time. The ultimate result depends on the amount of resources the invading or pacifying force possesses and is willing to expend (and the level of brutality in which they're willing to engage) versus the value of the target.As time went on and resources were stretched to cover large areas decisions had to be made as to what was and was not worth the expenditure of those resources.

In the case of the Ligures, they held out for a very long time...
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/71/Extent_of_the_Roman_Republic_and_the_Roman_Empire_ between_218_BC_and_117_AD.png

Ultimately, they were doomed because they lay athwart the path along the coast into France desperately needed by a strong and still expanding Roman empire. So, the result of all that death and destruction was that they lost anyway. They would have been better off, in my opinion, if they had taken client status, as had so many other tribes. They had a penchant for choosing the wrong side, however, as they showed by siding with the Carthaginians. After all, it's not like this was the Third Reich where they planned to exterminate all the Poles, for example, and take over all the land. Fifty years after they were defeated, the descendents of the Celt-Ligurians who had hidden out in the mountains were prosperous citizens of Rome. Meanwhile, huge chunks of their population had been exterminated and another huge chunk had been exiled. With the Germans in WWII it was a different story. There could be no accommodation with them because their goal was not eventual incorporation on any kind of equal footing, but permanent virtual slave status or annihilation. However, given their level of resources, the "Ligures" would again have been defeated if it weren't for the aid given by the British and the Allied invasion of Italy.