PDA

View Full Version : Breakdown of R1b subclades in the USA and Canada



Tomenable
20-04-15, 09:49
R1b is the single most numerous Y-DNA hg among European-Americans, but I couldn't find any info about proportions of subclades.

mihaitzateo
21-04-15, 09:32
R1b is the single most numerous Y-DNA hg among European-Americans, but I couldn't find any info about proportions of subclades.

Do you have some Y-DNA testing of Caucasian race Americans and Canadians?

Tomenable
21-04-15, 12:56
Do you have some Y-DNA testing of Caucasian race Americans and Canadians?

Yes - Americans - but this study gives no info on subclades, authors lump all subclades of R1b together as simply "R1b":

http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/31036-U-S-race-groups-and-haplogroups?p=453487#post453487

RobertColumbia
23-06-15, 19:48
Do you have some Y-DNA testing of Caucasian race Americans and Canadians?

My y-haplotype of R1b-M222 matches up nicely with the documented journey of my paternal ancestors out of Appalachia (Kentucky specifically) in the mid 1800's. Appalachia, as mentioned in Albion's Seed, was largely settled by farmers being chased off the Ulster Plantation by Cromwell et al. and who went up into the mountains of North America in search of cheaper land. These Ulster Appalachians ("hillbillies") were largely of Northern Irish and Lowland Scottish origin, which matches up very closely with the current distribution of R1b-M222. Appalachia today remains a hotbed of Celtic culture and is sometimes visited by anthropologists seeking older versions of traditional Irish and Scottish music.

FunkyWanderer
25-06-15, 16:04
I'm R1B L21 DF13, pure french Canadian with my heritage coming through Ontario,Quebec,New Brunswich,Acadia,and originating from nobility in France escaping as a Huguenot.

It's been very interesting to do my geneology, I can trace back to 1009 and is filled with chivalry and crusades and great conquests all under the flag of the lion of the tribe of judah.

I recommend everyone do try and trace their geneology, it's uber fun.

LeBrok
25-06-15, 16:25
I'm R1B L21 DF13, pure french Canadian with my heritage coming through Ontario,Quebec,New Brunswich,Acadia,and originating from nobility in France escaping as a Huguenot.

It's been very interesting to do my geneology, I can trace back to 1009 and is filled with chivalry and crusades and great conquests all under the flag of the lion of the tribe of judah.

I recommend everyone do try and trace their geneology, it's uber fun.
It is amazing that you can trace you genealogy much farther than queen of England. I believe you needed to use some guesses and speculations.

FunkyWanderer
25-06-15, 17:36
It is amazing that you can trace you genealogy much farther than queen of England. I believe you needed to use some guesses and speculations.


Because the church marriage docs in Canada and then books written about the lineages of nobility I can follow a direct path established by genealogist to a common ancestor, which has proven itself with a triangulation by ydna with 3 other people who share my last name and ancestry.

I'm sure, had my ancestor not been a noble before escaping France, there would be no record of him... but he was, and the books are available online.

Brennos
25-06-15, 18:04
Because the church marriage docs in Canada and then books written about the lineages of nobility I can follow a direct path established by genealogist to a common ancestor, which has proven itself with a triangulation by ydna with 3 other people who share my last name and ancestry.

I'm sure, had my ancestor not been a noble before escaping France, there would be no record of him... but he was, and the books are available online.

Surname... the old French nobility hasn't a surname.

To be sure of a so deep genealogy, you must have all the so called "three graces" of every ancestor... that is:
1) birth certificate/baptism;
2) marriage certificate/act;
3) death certificate/act.

And, also, notarial acts of your ancestors that can certify their life and relationships: chartae testamenti, chartae dotis, chartae divisionum et finium, chartae emptionum, etc...

P.s.: I'm a genealogist.

Angela
25-06-15, 18:43
Plus, I don't mean to cast aspersions on anyone's ancestors, but I assume people are aware of the average NPE rate that's been calculated? Over a thousand year period to be absolutely sure that there wasn't at least one sort of stretches credulity doesn't it?

Even among royalty, where it was paramount that the succession be valid, you have about three, at last count, occurring in the Lancastrian and Yorkist lines.

hornblower35
08-10-15, 04:16
Surname... the old French nobility hasn't a surname.

To be sure of a so deep genealogy, you must have all the so called "three graces" of every ancestor... that is:
1) birth certificate/baptism;
2) marriage certificate/act;
3) death certificate/act.

And, also, notarial acts of your ancestors that can certify their life and relationships: chartae testamenti, chartae dotis, chartae divisionum et finium, chartae emptionum, etc...

P.s.: I'm a genealogist.

Here in the Basque Country we are in luck because we can acced to those certificates online. Using surnames in some branches I could reach to 1500...And all of them lived in a little area not bigger than 40 km radius.
Just to comment...As you say it is funny

Gladaman
31-10-15, 18:15
I'm on gedmatch.com and it seems that I can see the Haplogroup Mt, Y for some that are matches but I don't know how to find mine. I hope that doesn't make me sound as though I'm not very bright, cousins.