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Arame
14-07-15, 14:48
Excerpts:
In recent years, the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) led to the discovery of thousands of new polymorphisms used to improve the Y chromosome phylogenetic tree. In addition, the possibility of revealing a high number of stable polymorphisms has led to the reevaluation of SNPs as an optimal tool for age estimation of the tree nodes.

In this study, we present an updated phylogenetic structure for haplogroup E, which is the most represented MSY lineage in Africa (Cruciani et al. 2002), focusing on the E-M35 clade. This haplogroup received considerable attention in the literature because it has a broad geographic distribution, being present at high frequencies in a wide area stretching from northern and eastern Africa to Europe and western Asia. Moreover, the lineages sharing the M35 mutation have been linked to a wide range of human movements and a multitude of theories have been proposed about their time and place of origin (Arredi et al. 2004; Semino et al. 2004; Cruciani et al. 2006, 2007; Adams et al. 2008; Henn et al. 2008; Battaglia et al. 2009; Lancaster 2009; Trombetta et al. 2011; Bučková et al. 2013; Gebremeskel and Ibrahim 2014).
Within this clade, the posterior probability (0.97) strongly favors an eastern African placement for the origin of the E-M215 diversity, as previously suggested by Semino et al. (2004) and Gebremeskel and Ibrahim (2014), whereas a northern African location is favored for the node defining the M78 subclade (posterior probability = 0.76), supporting the previous hypothesis of Cruciani et al. (2007).
... our phylogeographic analysis, based on thousands of samples worldwide, suggests that the radiation of haplogroup E started about 58 ka, somewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, with a higher posterior probability (0.73) for an eastern African origin. Moreover, it seems that the next five major dichotomies also occurred in eastern Africa (posterior probabilities ranging 0.84–0.97) in a time frame of about 15 ky (55–40 ka), underlying the importance of this region for the early differentiation of this widespread haplogroup and for the peopling of the entire continent.
In conclusion, we show that haplogroup E and, more specifically, its subhaplogroup E-M35, previously refractory to several subsequent phylogenetic refinements, contain a lot of phylogenetic and phylogeographic information which can be useful for evolutionary and forensics purposes. These results emphasize the relevance of analyzing large population samples to fully disclose the phylogenetic information hidden in the great number of mutations that have been reported in recent Y chromosome NGS studies. In general, we look forward to large population studies that make use of newly available mutation resources as a promising way to reveal the paternal side of our evolutionary history, like it has been already done in a very limited number of studies so far (Rootsi et al. 2013; Underhill et al. 2015).

http://gbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/7/7/1940.long

The split between the M78 and M123 branches dates from 25.000 years ago. M78 itself is 15.000 years old while its V12, V13 and V22 branches are, respectively, 10,000, 8,000 and 8,000 years old. M34 itself is 20.000 years old.
It seems that E-V13 was part of a second neolithic wave from Levant perhaps alongside with J2.

http://gbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/7/7/1940/F1.large.jpg

Arame
14-07-15, 15:05
Please can someone help me to understand the subclade of Near Eastern E-V13.
It seems that it splited somewhere in Levant/Anatolia. One branch went to Europe, one is peaking in Kurdistan.
What is the subclade of Near Eastern E-V13?

Maleth
15-07-15, 08:50
Please can someone help me to understand the subclade of Near Eastern E-V13.
It seems that it splited somewhere in Levant/Anatolia. One branch went to Europe, one is peaking in Kurdistan.
What is the subclade of Near Eastern E-V13?

The verdict is still on. Main stream understanding as most papers suggest is that E-V13 crossed to Balkans from the East, but no one can pin point from were. If it was mutated in Levant/Anatolia a split would be possible.

Maciamo believes that it crossed directly from North Africa even suggested Libya to Italy.

There seems to be also a possibility that E-V13 was mutated in Balkans itself. Therefore most E-V 13 outside Balkans will be imports.

I dont think that anyone can say for certain, but things are moving.

Sile
15-07-15, 21:20
The verdict is still on. Main stream understanding as most papers suggest is that E-V13 crossed to Balkans from the East, but no one can pin point from were. If it was mutated in Levant/Anatolia a split would be possible.

Maciamo believes that it crossed directly from North Africa even suggested Libya to Italy.

There seems to be also a possibility that E-V13 was mutated in Balkans itself. Therefore most E-V 13 outside Balkans will be imports.

I dont think that anyone can say for certain, but things are moving.

Maybe the E-v13 began in cyprus and in the border area of modern turkey and syria, where dozens of pot furnaces in ancient times where creating hundreds of pots, these pots by their thousands of pieces are found also in Cornwall England, where recent matching techniques associate the finds with only 1 spot in the med.

Oppenheimer in his book The Origins of the British on p. 206 says that haplogroup E3b (now E1b) has its highest frequency in the British Isles at 33% in Abergele in Wales. Elsewhere in southern England the frequency of E1b is reported to be about 5-10%. It would appear that the vast majority of E1b males in the British Isles are in subhaplogroup E-V13. There were copper mines in Wales and Cornwall (Europe Between the Oceans, p. 181). These could have been manned by people who were imported from the Balkans during the Bronze Age.

Trade of anatolian pots for cornish tin has been confirmed.

Piro Ilir
20-07-15, 22:07
Maybe the E-v13 began in cyprus and in the border area of modern turkey and syria, where dozens of pot furnaces in ancient times where creating hundreds of pots, these pots by their thousands of pieces are found also in Cornwall England, where recent matching techniques associate the finds with only 1 spot in the med.

Oppenheimer in his book The Origins of the British on p. 206 says that haplogroup E3b (now E1b) has its highest frequency in the British Isles at 33% in Abergele in Wales. Elsewhere in southern England the frequency of E1b is reported to be about 5-10%. It would appear that the vast majority of E1b males in the British Isles are in subhaplogroup E-V13. There were copper mines in Wales and Cornwall (Europe Between the Oceans, p. 181). These could have been manned by people who were imported from the Balkans during the Bronze Age.

Trade of anatolian pots for cornish tin has been confirmed.
Maybe you're right on this, or maybe British EV13 you mentioned here came with Romans during the Roman invasion. But for more some Illyrian tribes became celticized during bronze age, and they migrated later to isles, I guess.