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Alan
25-11-15, 22:14
DUHOK, Kurdistan region 'Iraq', — The archeological director in Dohuk province (the Kurdistan Region) said his office has discovered over 100 historic pieces, some of them dating back to 200,000 years ago.

Hasan Ahmed told AK news the discovery was the outcome of several years of searching and digging across Duhok province.

Some of the items with 10,000 were used for milling grain. A 2200 year old statue made of baked clay has also been discovered.

Besides, there are 43 lanterns among the relics which are supposed to have been used by the residents in the religious ceremonies and for scaring the beasts and sending them away. These date back to 200,000 ago, Ahmed added.

The Artifacts Directorate in Duhok province revealed Tuesday about finding 100 artifacts which belong to various periods in one of the archaeological hills west of the province, saying that more artifacts may be found in the same area.

The head of the Directorate Hassan Ahmed Qassim said that the artifacts belong to various eras, including hammers that go back to the Neolithic era, which dates up to 10,000 years.

"There is also a second group includes a statue, eight coins and 34 lamps, pestles, and parts of the columns that go back to the Hellenistic era which dates up to 2300 years and continued for 300 years."

"There is also another group of artifacts that are pestles and pieces of pottery dating back to before 1000 years, and all these pieces were found in the same place where we found two statues and announced about them at the beginning of March."

The Artifacts Directorate in Duhok province announced on the second of last March finding archaeological statues that go back to the era before Christmas in one of the archaeological hills west of the province adding that the statues have been carved in the same area because they are made of the available limestone in the region.

"Our work, as directorate of artifacts, is done by our efforts, where we have PhDs, master's and bachelor's specialists in this field and we have ready teams that work at archaeological sites within Duhok province. We get the support from Duhok province and the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), and we rely on ourselves in all our works."

About the possibility of finding more artifacts he said: "We are continuing the excavation process at three sites, and I assure that we will announce about other discoveries soon. The area that we are working in is very old and goes back to the Paleolithic era, ie, before 70,000 years, and there are more than 700 archaeological sites discovered in Duhok as a whole."

Karim Shayar, as an expert on the archeological sites of other Kurdish area, sheds light in 2009 on the decay of the historical landmarks, and believes that the Kurdish government has not paid enough attention to them.

And after the 1991 uprising of Kurdish people and the establishment of the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), the Kurdish government has not paid enough attention to the place. The historical sites, in particular the citadel, are threatened by destruction, he claims.

There are hundreds more historical sites in other areas of Kurdistan which remain ignored, one of them being the village of Charmo, which is believed to be the oldest village in the world.


http://ekurd.net/mismas/articles/misc2011/4/300x225xstate4977.jpg.pagespeed.ic.8N422W6S_o.jpg


http://ekurd.net/mismas/articles/misc2011/4/state4977.htm

bicicleur
25-11-15, 23:02
incredible, this is spectacular
what kind of humans lived in the area 200 ka?
can you tell more about this Hassan Ahmed Qassim?

Alan
25-11-15, 23:14
incredible, this is spectacular
what kind of humans lived in the area 200 ka?
can you tell more about this Hassan Ahmed Qassim?
no sorry, hear his name for the first time.

I am not sure what kind of people lived in the area 200.000 years ago but certanly they had good knowledge of handicraft and had religious rituals which could indicate community lifestyle - first steps towards civilization?

Whoever they were they must have been close to Proto Eurasians.

LeBrok
25-11-15, 23:47
Whoever they were they must have been some kind of Proto Eurasians.
Yep, Neanderthals. They knew how to make fire, you know.

Alan
26-11-15, 00:32
Yep, Neanderthals. They knew how to make fire, you know.

But lanterns and religious ceremonies, where they capable of creating these kind of things? Possible.

LeBrok
26-11-15, 04:17
But lanterns and religious ceremonies, where they capable of creating these kind of things? Possible.
They say supposed religious use. All we know they had some sort of lanterns for fire.

DuPidh
26-11-15, 04:31
DUHOK, Kurdistan region 'Iraq', — The archeological director in Dohuk province (the Kurdistan Region) said his office has discovered over 100 historic pieces, some of them dating back to 200,000 years ago.

Hasan Ahmed told AK news the discovery was the outcome of several years of searching and digging across Duhok province.

Some of the items with 10,000 were used for milling grain. A 2200 year old statue made of baked clay has also been discovered.

Besides, there are 43 lanterns among the relics which are supposed to have been used by the residents in the religious ceremonies and for scaring the beasts and sending them away. These date back to 200,000 ago, Ahmed added.

The Artifacts Directorate in Duhok province revealed Tuesday about finding 100 artifacts which belong to various periods in one of the archaeological hills west of the province, saying that more artifacts may be found in the same area.

The head of the Directorate Hassan Ahmed Qassim said that the artifacts belong to various eras, including hammers that go back to the Neolithic era, which dates up to 10,000 years.

"There is also a second group includes a statue, eight coins and 34 lamps, pestles, and parts of the columns that go back to the Hellenistic era which dates up to 2300 years and continued for 300 years."

"There is also another group of artifacts that are pestles and pieces of pottery dating back to before 1000 years, and all these pieces were found in the same place where we found two statues and announced about them at the beginning of March."

The Artifacts Directorate in Duhok province announced on the second of last March finding archaeological statues that go back to the era before Christmas in one of the archaeological hills west of the province adding that the statues have been carved in the same area because they are made of the available limestone in the region.

"Our work, as directorate of artifacts, is done by our efforts, where we have PhDs, master's and bachelor's specialists in this field and we have ready teams that work at archaeological sites within Duhok province. We get the support from Duhok province and the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), and we rely on ourselves in all our works."

About the possibility of finding more artifacts he said: "We are continuing the excavation process at three sites, and I assure that we will announce about other discoveries soon. The area that we are working in is very old and goes back to the Paleolithic era, ie, before 70,000 years, and there are more than 700 archaeological sites discovered in Duhok as a whole."

Karim Shayar, as an expert on the archeological sites of other Kurdish area, sheds light in 2009 on the decay of the historical landmarks, and believes that the Kurdish government has not paid enough attention to them.

And after the 1991 uprising of Kurdish people and the establishment of the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), the Kurdish government has not paid enough attention to the place. The historical sites, in particular the citadel, are threatened by destruction, he claims.

There are hundreds more historical sites in other areas of Kurdistan which remain ignored, one of them being the village of Charmo, which is believed to be the oldest village in the world.


http://ekurd.net/mismas/articles/misc2011/4/300x225xstate4977.jpg.pagespeed.ic.8N422W6S_o.jpg


http://ekurd.net/mismas/articles/misc2011/4/state4977.htm


Does Hasan Ahmed Qasim know all numbers?

bicicleur
26-11-15, 09:40
Yep, Neanderthals. They knew how to make fire, you know.

probably not
200 - 350 ka Yabrudian people lived in the Levant, Neanderthals came later
humans know the use of fire at least since 400 ka, probably much longer even

I'd like to know what kind of 'lanterns'

LeBrok
26-11-15, 09:45
probably not
200 - 350 ka Yabrudian people lived in the Levant, Neanderthals came later
humans know the use of fire at least since 400 ka, probably much longer even

I'd like to know what kind of 'lanterns'
Sure, could be some related homo erectus, or still unknown hominid.

Alan
26-11-15, 13:11
@LeBrock and bicicleur

I found another article that in Iraqi Kurdistan 60-80.000 year old Neanderthal sekeltons have been found. But I haven't heard of any Neanderthal findings from 200.000 years.

bicicleur
26-11-15, 13:55
@LeBrock and bicicleur

I found another article that in Iraqi Kurdistan 60-80.000 year old Neanderthal sekeltons have been found. But I haven't heard of any Neanderthal findings from 200.000 years.

yes 80 ka Neanderthals in Shanidar cave, this is well known