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Angela
08-12-15, 18:19
I needed a giggle, so...

http://brilliantmaps.com/culinary-horrors-europe/

Actually, some countries eat more than one of those things. My father so loved the maggoty cheese of Sardinia that he used to go to the harbor in La Spezia to meet the boats so he'd be sure to get some. YUCK! :petrified: My mother made him eat it outside. :grin:

Stereotype maps are sometimes funny, so long as they don't cross the line into racism, and you don't take them too seriously...

How Italians view the food of Europe:
http://brilliantmaps.com/italian-food/

Interestingly, the map was made by a Russian.:startled:
I don't understand the difference between "literally" tasteless and "aesthetically" tasteless. :confused2:

Danelaw
08-12-15, 19:04
http://alphadesigner.com/about The author is Bulgarian.

sparkey
08-12-15, 21:22
LOL at Nestlé for Switzerland.

Other than Nestlé, I think the only one I've tried is head cheese. It was OK, nothing special, the gelatin was the more notable thing about it than the meat. Around here it's marketed as Bavarian rather than Dutch, though, so maybe I'm not getting the right variety.

Also, there have got to be more disgusting dishes for Scotland of all places than fried pizza.

FBS
08-12-15, 21:54
Yanko Tsvetkov (yes he is Bulgarian) and his absolutely hilarious Atlas of prejudice & Atlas of prejudice 2. They are great, however my favorite maps are "20 ways to slice a continent" lol http://www.movehub.com/blog/atlas-of-prejudice

Angela
08-12-15, 23:11
LOL at Nestlé for Switzerland.

Other than Nestlé, I think the only one I've tried is head cheese. It was OK, nothing special, the gelatin was the more notable thing about it than the meat. Around here it's marketed as Bavarian rather than Dutch, though, so maybe I'm not getting the right variety.

Also, there have got to be more disgusting dishes for Scotland of all places than fried pizza.

We eat a lot of tripe, but in stew, not soup; it's good with the right sauce, but I never was able to get my children to eat it. In Firenze it's street food; vendors sell it from little carts. :) Salted pig fat is just lard, isn't it? American pie crusts always used to be made with lard, before the invention of Crisco, that is. There's a bakery near me that still does it. They can't keep the pies in stock. We use it or used to use it in less health conscious times instead of olive oil or in addition to it to make the soffrito base for many dishes. It adds great flavor to food. The Lardo of Colonnata is a great delicacy. It's delicious on a nice piece of Italian bread.
http://www.italia.it/uploads/RTEmagicC_Lardo_colonnata.jpg.jpg

I would have thought they would have put haggis for Scotland. I don't think it sounds at all bad, frankly. Also, what's wrong with fried pizza? That's what this is, fried pizza dough, and it's delicious.

They're called zepolle, a Sicilian "pastry". They're divine, but one is enough unless you have a cast iron stomach.
http://www.jannorris.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Steves-zeppole-500x333.jpg


This is deep fried pasta dough. We call them farfalle or butterflies, but Americans call them bowties.
http://www.mangiabenepasta.com/images/bowties.jpg

oriental
09-12-15, 00:52
I had Iranian bosses and sometimes we go out quite frequently to Vietnamese restaurants. They like Vietnamese food and soup with ripe as well, who knew?

Boreas
09-12-15, 05:09
http://www.saraycigercisi.com/Yonetim/resimler/images/kuzu_kelle.jpg

Yammy :laughing:

and others

As the local taste (in Kilikia),


https://i.ytimg.com/vi/WOYCfPdILmM/maxresdefault.jpg

What if foreigners eat it,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vi8TQsqRm5Y

LeBrok
09-12-15, 05:41
We eat a lot of tripe, but in stew, not soup; it's good with the right sauce, but I never was able to get my children to eat it. Same in my house. I love it but kids can't look at it. I blame myself not feeding my kids more exotic dishes before they were big enough to hear about ingredients, lol.


Salted pig fat is just lard, isn't it? American pie crusts always used to be made with lard, before the invention of Crisco, that is. There's a bakery near me that still does it. They can't keep the pies in stock. We use it or used to use it in less health conscious times instead of olive oil or in addition to it to make the soffrito base for many dishes. It adds great flavor to food. The Lardo of Colonnata is a great delicacy. It's delicious on a nice piece of Italian bread.
Like it too when is well marinated to eat and with bread with butter. In my case with sourdough rye fresh and crispy.



This is deep fried pasta dough. We call them farfalle or butterflies, but Americans call them bowties.
http://www.mangiabenepasta.com/images/bowties.jpgAre known in Poland too.


The only food that I couldn't eat so far was boiled cow's tongue in horseradish souse. Actually it was delicious but my throat seized up in half the way. At least if they cut up it in small pieces, but no, it was served as God created.
I like creative french cousin with frog legs and fried liver, though I'm not fun of escargot.

Maciamo
09-12-15, 10:15
I needed a giggle, so...

http://brilliantmaps.com/culinary-horrors-europe/

Actually, some countries eat more than one of those things. My father so loved the maggoty cheese of Sardinia that he used to go to the harbor in La Spezia to meet the boats so he'd be sure to get some. YUCK! :petrified: My mother made him eat it outside. :grin:


I am not squeamish when it comes to blood or unusual foods, so the map doesn't really disturbs me. The only exception if the maggot cheese, which I really couldn't bring myself to eat (and I have eaten ants and grasshoppers). I like the touch of humour with Nestlé in Switzerland.



How Italians view the food of Europe:
http://brilliantmaps.com/italian-food/

Interestingly, the map was made by a Russian.:startled:


Funny, but highly inaccurate if it was really based on scores given by Italian tourists abroad. For example it doesn't make sense to give three different shades for France, where the cuisine is not considerably better or worse in any particular region. Preconceived ideas are pretty meaningless. It would be better to do a sort of scientific survey of people's opinion of food quality in various countries and sort the results by rationality to see if some nationalities have higher standards about foods than others, and how tastes vary across cultural groups, linguistic families, and genetic/ethnic groups (e.g. North vs South Italians).

As for the 'toxic' shade of the map, it is ironic since one of the few food items about which potential toxic content I worry when I buy it is mozzarella from Campania, after all the horror stories about the piles of illegal toxic wastes and dioxin spewed in the air by waste incineration in the so-called triangle of death (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_of_death_%28Italy%29) around Naples and inhaled and swallowed by local buffaloes. I love Italian food but it always gives me the chills when I see a package of mozzarella stating that it is real mozzarella from Caserta or Capua, just a few kilometers north of the triangle of death. I try to buy only organic mozzarella and if possible not from Campania for that reason. When it comes to toxicity, I would certainly trust more Swedish food items than Neapolitan ones.

Maleth
09-12-15, 11:13
They're called zepolle, a Sicilian "pastry". They're divine, but one is enough unless you have a cast iron stomach.
http://www.jannorris.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Steves-zeppole-500x333.jpg




We have these too called Zeppolini called after GuZEPPI as they are a specialty for St Joseph feast round about March I think. They are filled with sweetened ricotta and as you said fried...I can eat more then one mmm :)

I had frog legs last time in France and they were absolutely delicious....no joking. They told me they are imported from Slovakia or Slovenia these days (Im not sure which)

Drac II
09-12-15, 12:29
What's supposedly "disgusting" about squid ink? And it is actually great. In Spain it is used for the sauce to make squid and rice ("calamares en su tinta"), and in Italy it is used to make the sauce for some rice and pasta dishes ("al nero di seppia")

FBS
09-12-15, 13:27
Yankos' maps are just funny, not to accurate but love them anyway. For e.g. in Kosovo, not all the regions eat tripe nor the heads of cow or sheep or other animal, they simply gave it away to poor. Highlanders, and their ancestors now, would never eat a "poor mans food" as they call it, but urban areas do eat tripe in soup known as paqa (pacha) which is made with head meat as well, but one can never find it in restaurants, they usually make it with meat since not everyone likes it. There is however a speciality, strict to few families, pie with tripe, and it is usually a man thing, women would make it but they do not like it, man simply die for it. I do not understand it since I come from the highlanders tribe, lol. In some families there was a version of haggis as well, my female (mothers) line used to have it as a family recipe but not in our family, it was a no no.

Angela
09-12-15, 17:09
Yankos' maps are just funny, not to accurate but love them anyway. For e.g. in Kosovo, not all the regions eat tripe nor the heads of cow or sheep or other animal, they simply gave it away to poor. Highlanders, and their ancestors now, would never eat a "poor mans food" as they call it, but urban areas do eat tripe in soup known as paqa (pacha) which is made with head meat as well, but one can never find it in restaurants, they usually make it with meat since not everyone likes it. There is however a speciality, strict to few families, pie with tripe, and it is usually a man thing, women would make it but they do not like it, man simply die for it. I do not understand it since I come from the highlanders tribe, lol. In some families there was a version of haggis as well, my female (mothers) line used to have it as a family recipe but not in our family, it was a no no.

You're absolutely right. They're just fun, not something to take too seriously or to take umbrage at...

Italians are very conservative about food, so a lot of traditional, "peasant" food is still part of the cuisine, although nowadays some of it's made only in certain restaurants or prepared at sagre during the summer instead of in the home kitchen. The fact is that many of these "old time" dishes are delicious as well as being testimony to the fact that nothing was ever wasted, or should be wasted from the animals we consume. People with a good palate and talent who are willing to spend a lot of time on a dish can indeed make "a silk purse out of a sow's ear metaphorically speaking"!They're actually sort of a vogue in urban areas. That's what's happened to a lot of traditional Roman food of the poor, which was based on offal of various sorts.

Oxtail Stew:
http://lemonsandanchovies.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Oxtail-Stew.jpg

@ Boreas, I have never eaten the head of a sheep or cow, nor seen one prepared, but I have eaten the head of fish, however. :) In fact, I was trained never to eat a fish unless the head was on it. It's one of the ways to know the fish is fresh.

I had to look up your Turkish specialty, and feared the worst. http://cdn.eupedia.com/forum/images/smilies/main/petrified.gif I was relieved to find it was just a haggis like stuffed intestine. http://cdn.eupedia.com/forum/images/smilies/main/grin.png

This is how they serve tripe at vendor's stalls in Florence. Not quite so frightening looking. http://cdn.eupedia.com/forum/images/smilies/main/smile.gif
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_e46G7H-mRDc/S3cWZrmb4LI/AAAAAAAAAv4/wx0_U0zXFPk/s320/lampredotto+panino.JPG

Stewed tripe Florentine style:
http://www.melroseplace.it/ratatouille/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Trippa_alla_Melrose1.jpg

LeBrok
09-12-15, 17:44
http://www.saraycigercisi.com/Yonetim/resimler/images/kuzu_kelle.jpg

Now, this is freaky, when food is looking back at you, lol.

Twilight
10-12-15, 08:23
Where is Andrew Zimmerman when you need him :D . I find it interesting that Rotten shark is available in Iceland, looks like the Greenland shark is poisonous to eat when fresh

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hákarl

Drac II
11-12-15, 10:03
Squid ink, horse meat, liver paste, head cheese, deep fried pizza, lard: some of these are not exactly "healthy" but I would hardly qualify them as "disgusting". Some of the blood ones, like blood sausage, also are not really "disgusting", at least not once you taste them and get over the fact that they have pig blood in them. Frog legs are also not that weird to be labelled "disgusting". Entrails, genitalia, raw urchin, rotting/fermenting fish and cheese with maggots one can understand why most people would consider them "disgusting".

Maciamo
11-12-15, 10:27
Squid ink, horse meat, liver paste, head cheese, deep fried pizza, lard: some of these are not exactly "healthy" but I would hardly qualify them as "disgusting". Some of the blood ones, like blood sausage, also are not really "disgusting", at least not once you taste them and get over the fact that they have pig blood in them. Frog legs are also not that weird to be labelled "disgusting". Entrails, genitalia, raw urchin, rotting/fermenting fish and cheese with maggots one can understand why most people would consider them "disgusting".

Why would raw urchins (known as uni or 海胆 in Japanese, for sushi aficionados) be disgusting ? That's just seafood. It's not more disgusting than eating raw scallops or oysters. Then why would you have a problem with fermented fish if you eat other fermented foods like yogurt, cheese or sauerkraut ?

I think that maggots cross a particular psychological line because dead human bodies are eaten by those very maggots, and you surely don't want to accelerate that process or tempt them to eat you alive from the inside !

Maciamo
11-12-15, 10:41
Where is Andrew Zimmerman when you need him :D . I find it interesting that Rotten shark is available in Iceland, looks like the Greenland shark is poisonous to eat when fresh

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hákarl

It's never a good idea to eat carnivores on top of the food chain as they contain the most accumulated toxins and heavy metals. Just in case you were stranded in the Arctic and decided to hunt polar bears to survive, be warned that eating their liver is deadly, but for another reason. It contains far too much vitamin A, which would cause immediate acute hypervitaminosis A, which will cause severe headache, hypersensitivity to sunlight, vomiting, hair loss, yellow discoloration of the skin, skin peeling, softening of the skull bone, bone swelling, spontaneous fracture, atrocious pain, and eventually death. Not a fun way to go.

When you consider that, eating insects is not a bad alternative after all.

Maciamo
11-12-15, 10:42
http://www.saraycigercisi.com/Yonetim/resimler/images/kuzu_kelle.jpg



Now, this is freaky, when food is looking back at you, lol.

I was more worried about their last visit to the dentist.

Angela
11-12-15, 15:28
Another visual for you all. Polenta e osei. They're little birds. It's a dish particularly loved in the Veneto, but it's served in my area too. The real aficionados lift them up by their feet and just bite down, head and all. :shocked:

I can't do it myself but I'm used to seeing it. Not so our British part time residents. When my dinner companion assaulted the dish with gusto, an English woman sitting at an adjoining table started to heave and had to leave the table!:grin:

http://www.komitee.de/sites/www.komitee.de/files/images/P1050875.jpg

Eating raw sea creatures is sort of standard in most coastal communities, isn't it? There's a certain shell fish called datari because they're oval and black which used to be very common in the Ligurian Sea. I remember going with my father and he would just slice them open and gulp them down. So many people loved them that I think you can barely find them anymore.

Sea urchins are called ricci di mare in Italy...a lot of people love them. It's not really the eggs that you're eating; it's the gonads that produce them, which is a bit off putting for some people.

http://www.sardegnaricerche.it/immagini/13_119_20070124130148.jpg

LeBrok
11-12-15, 17:25
Why would raw urchins (known as uni or 海胆 in Japanese, for sushi aficionados) be disgusting ? That's just seafood. It's not more disgusting than eating raw scallops or oysters. Then why would you have a problem with fermented fish if you eat other fermented foods like yogurt, cheese or sauerkraut ?

I think that maggots cross a particular psychological line because dead human bodies are eaten by those very maggots, and you surely don't want to accelerate that process or tempt them to eat you alive from the inside !
Easy to say, I had shrimp first time in my life in age of 25. It took me good 10 years to fully enjoy them. Maybe because they look like big white maggots, lol?

Angela
11-12-15, 21:04
Easy to say, I had shrimp first time in my life in age of 25. It took me good 10 years to fully enjoy them. Maybe because they look like big white maggots, lol?

LeBrok, have you ever had pan fried soft shell crab? I know it might sound disgusting, because it's not gutted or anything, and instead you eat it whole, legs, insides and all, but take my word for it, it's absolutely divine, one of the highlights of American cuisine.

These are the nasty little critters in all their primordial ugliness. They remind me of some of the monsters in the Lord of the Rings!
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5182/5680505758_3813f53306_z.jpg


This is what they look like in all their crusty, buttery, deliciousness.
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1389/873077312_69e8ffdbb4.jpg

LeBrok
12-12-15, 03:44
LeBrok, have you ever had pan fried soft shell crab? I know it might sound disgusting, because it's not gutted or anything, and instead you eat it whole, legs, insides and all, but take my word for it, it's absolutely divine, one of the highlights of American cuisine.

These are the nasty little critters in all their primordial ugliness. They remind me of some of the monsters in the Lord of the Rings!
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5182/5680505758_3813f53306_z.jpg


This is what they look like in all their crusty, buttery, deliciousness.
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1389/873077312_69e8ffdbb4.jpg

Sounds like adventure to me, hehe. Where are they served, New York?

Angela
12-12-15, 04:37
Sounds like adventure to me, hehe. Where are they served, New York?

It's really a southern thing: Maryland, North and South Carolina, New Orleans. I normally wouldn't order them in New York. They should be cooked within a few hours of their dying, because they spoil very quickly and the delicate, sweet flavor disappears. I normally order them in Florida or if I happen to be in the Washington DC area. It's a spring through September season.

The fishermen usually catch them when they're still hard shelled, put them in a salt water tank until they molt the hard shell and then quickly remove them before their shell can harden again.

It's not so bad, really; they do remove the gills and the abdomen, I think.

They also serve them deep fried in a sandwich with french fries. I guess I never thought about it, but it does look a little barbaric, yes? :) They call it a Po-Boy.


http://thirstyreader.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/softshellpoboy2.jpg

LeBrok
12-12-15, 07:40
It's really a southern thing: Maryland, North and South Carolina, New Orleans. I normally wouldn't order them in New York. They should be cooked within a few hours of their dying, because they spoil very quickly and the delicate, sweet flavor disappears. I normally order them in Florida or if I happen to be in the Washington DC area. It's a spring through September season.

The fishermen usually catch them when they're still hard shelled, put them in a salt water tank until they molt the hard shell and then quickly remove them before their shell can harden again.

It's not so bad, really; they do remove the gills and the abdomen, I think.

They also serve them deep fried in a sandwich with french fries. I guess I never thought about it, but it does look a little barbaric, yes? :) They call it a Po-Boy.


http://thirstyreader.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/softshellpoboy2.jpg
No problem tasting them in this form. :) Looks very appetizing.

Drac II
12-12-15, 10:33
Why would raw urchins (known as uni or 海胆 in Japanese, for sushi aficionados) be disgusting ? That's just seafood. It's not more disgusting than eating raw scallops or oysters. Then why would you have a problem with fermented fish if you eat other fermented foods like yogurt, cheese or sauerkraut ?

I think that maggots cross a particular psychological line because dead human bodies are eaten by those very maggots, and you surely don't want to accelerate that process or tempt them to eat you alive from the inside !

In the case of the urchins it is more what they look like that puts off many people:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_l80GiiW2rtc/S7W0PnCwTlI/AAAAAAAAA1s/KLeUPvklX2M/s1600/james-island-sea-urchin-raw-eggs.jpg

The problem with fermented fish dishes is the strong smell they have. It is for a similar reason that many people can't bring themselves to try some other fermented foods, like some cheeses. Think of a "ripe" gorgonzola or limburger, they are great, but you have to get used to the smell first. Some people simply can't stomach the pungent smell and never try them.

Maciamo
12-12-15, 11:12
In the case of the urchins it is more what they look like that puts off many people:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_l80GiiW2rtc/S7W0PnCwTlI/AAAAAAAAA1s/KLeUPvklX2M/s1600/james-island-sea-urchin-raw-eggs.jpg



Sea urchins look more appetizing once they have been cleaned up and made into sushi. Just think you are eating alien brains and you'll be fine. ;-)

https://c1.staticflickr.com/7/6207/6122832043_e43652d59f_b.jpg



The problem with fermented fish dishes is the strong smell they have. It is for a similar reason that many people can't bring themselves to try some other fermented foods, like some cheeses. Think of a "ripe" gorgonzola or limburger, they are great, but you have to get used to the smell first. Some people simply can't stomach the pungent smell and never try them.

It's easier to try new fermented foods when you've been used to it since you were a child. Once you know how to ignore the smell of blue cheese, it's not that hard to try more exotic stuff. Japanese and Korean cuisines in particular have lots of fermented food items.

LeBrok
12-12-15, 17:08
Sea urchins look more appetizing once they have been cleaned up and made into sushi. Just think you are eating alien brains and you'll be fine. ;-)

https://c1.staticflickr.com/7/6207/6122832043_e43652d59f_b.jpg

I wouldn't mind trying it in this form. Looks great.




It's easier to try new fermented foods when you've been used to it since you were a child.Indead, kids need to introduced to variety of food since a very young age. Before they start questioning what they eat, and make them very hungry before trying new stuff. Otherwise we are raising food handicap generation.

son1ane
14-11-16, 08:35
Many are people are very fond of fig and camembert (http://www.cheese.com/camembert/) cheese bread and even mine. I personally love the classic mix of creamy, pungent cheese (http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/main/cheese/cheese2/whey/stinky-cheeses.asp) mixed with sweet and fruity fig preserve (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005GGUITQ?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creativeASIN=B005GGUITQ&linkCode=xm2&tag=nyfobl-20). But also love in addition caramelized onions and a few nuts for extra volume and crunchiness.

Joey D
10-12-16, 06:05
I remember staying with relatives in North Queensland, where they lived a short walk from the mangroves and mud flats. They'd put out traps each morning, and we've have fresh mud crabs for lunch, without fail. Mangoes were in season, which grew everywhere, and you are talking pretty much the perfect lunch.

Angela
10-12-16, 17:55
Many are people are very fond of fig and camembert (http://www.cheese.com/camembert/)cheese bread and even mine. I personally love the classic mix of creamy, pungent cheese (http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/main/cheese/cheese2/whey/stinky-cheeses.asp) mixed with sweet and fruity fig preserve (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005GGUITQ?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creativeASIN=B005GGUITQ&linkCode=xm2&tag=nyfobl-20). But also love in addition caramelized onions and a few nuts for extra volume and crunchiness.

Wow, missed this post originally. That sounds GREAT!!! Just my sort of food.

@Joey D,

Love, love, love, crab. You just have to forget what it looks like in its natural state and concentrate on the wonderful taste. I type this as I sip on a mango smoothie! :) Yum!

Minty
11-12-16, 07:58
Squid ink, horse meat, liver paste, head cheese, deep fried pizza, lard: some of these are not exactly "healthy" but I would hardly qualify them as "disgusting". Some of the blood ones, like blood sausage, also are not really "disgusting", at least not once you taste them and get over the fact that they have pig blood in them. Frog legs are also not that weird to be labelled "disgusting". Entrails, genitalia, raw urchin, rotting/fermenting fish and cheese with maggots one can understand why most people would consider them "disgusting".

What is wrong with frog legs, or liver? We eat those, and we are a lot thinner than Americans. My recent visit back to my birth country Malaysia tells me that these days a lot of Malaysians are overweight thanks to Western imported foods. Sugar Sugar Sugar !!! Obesity is a big problem now in Malaysia! I look slim and tall over there, where as in western countries I am petite and petite :P

Joey D
11-12-16, 08:14
What is wrong with frog legs, or liver? We eat those, and we are a lot thinner than Americans. My recent visit back to my birth country Malaysia tells me that these days a lot of Malaysians are overweight thanks to Western imported foods. Sugar Sugar Sugar !!! Obesity is a big problem now in Malaysia! I look slim and tall over there, where as in western countries I am petite and petite :P

I love Malaysia, its people and the cuisine is to die for (although I have to admit I prefer the coolness of the highlands to the humidity in places like KL :)

Talking about sugar, the one thing I do remember is that the various drinks you buy, not just the Western ones, but the unique flavours you can buy all over SE Asia, are very, very sweet, sweeter than I think we'd be used to in Australia.

I have one great memory of ordering a cup of tea, Western style, somewhere in Malaysia, and without even asking, the proprietor gave it to me with about four teaspoons of sugar sitting in it, the teaspoon was almost standing upright!

Yetos
11-12-16, 14:13
Πατσας Patsas soup is fantastic

and ideal for the 'alchool hangover'
the enemy of an alchoolic.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/73/Patsas_soup_200509.jpg

Twilight
11-12-16, 22:39
Have you guys ever tried Raw Salmon bellies or raw shrimp in Europe? Just curious


What is wrong with frog legs, or liver? We eat those, and we are a lot thinner than Americans. My recent visit back to my birth country Malaysia tells me that these days a lot of Malaysians are overweight thanks to Western imported foods. Sugar Sugar Sugar !!! Obesity is a big problem now in Malaysia! I look slim and tall over there, where as in western countries I am petite and petite :P

You know, I might as well try Frog legs. Wonder if there are any in the Asian grocery store in Chinatown. Might as well get some ready made lunch makings. Thanks for the suggestion :)

Jovialis
15-07-17, 04:19
http://i.imgur.com/ivNHetal.jpg

Here's a tripe and vegetable soup that my grandmother makes. I took a picture of it last time she had prepared it. I really like it, but people that aren't used to it sometimes are hesitant to try it.

I also really like lobster, and make it sometimes. A lot of people are grossed out by them. Which I find odd, since lobsters are pretty common I think.

davef
15-07-17, 07:23
http://i.imgur.com/ivNHetal.jpg

Here's a tripe and vegetable soup that my grandmother makes. I took a picture of it last time she had prepared it. I really like it, but people that aren't used to it sometimes are hesitant to try it.

I also really like lobster, and make it sometimes. A lot of people are grossed out by them. Which I find odd, since lobsters are pretty common I think.

That tripe looks delish! It's Italian, right? So it has to be good! I've never had tripe, but to me it's protein (meat) so I wouldn't be afraid of it.

Speaking of lobster, when my dad was dating a girl in high school, they ordered lobster...you know how lobster is sometimes served with those little cups of butter, right? Well my dad mistook it for a beverage and drank it down before realizing what it was. The relationship didn't last...(like the relationship with one of the other girls he went out with who broke up after he offered to take her out for a date...at a hot dog stand).

I think I know a) why I'm more of a frog than a prince...and b) what's behind my occasional silliness... genes. Lol.

Jovialis
21-07-17, 20:17
That tripe looks delish! It's Italian, right? So it has to be good! I've never had tripe, but to me it's protein (meat) so I wouldn't be afraid of it.

Speaking of lobster, when my dad was dating a girl in high school, they ordered lobster...you know how lobster is sometimes served with those little cups of butter, right? Well my dad mistook it for a beverage and drank it down before realizing what it was. The relationship didn't last...(like the relationship with one of the other girls he went out with who broke up after he offered to take her out for a date...at a hot dog stand).

I think I know a) why I'm more of a frog than a prince...and b) what's behind my occasional silliness... genes. Lol.

As far as I know, this recipe is Italian. Though I was suprised to see on that food map, that its popular in the Balkan region; but perhaps prepared differently. I live right accross the river from Manhattan (NJ); a lot of Hispanics (mostly Puerto Ricans) I know said they make tripe too.

davef
21-07-17, 20:33
I would imagine that tripe is an Iberian delicacy as well, since Puerto Ricans are largely Spanish.

Jovialis
18-09-17, 17:37
One of my new favorite things to eat is cow heart. It has a rubbery texture which I really like. I had it barbecued on a shish kabob. Totally not disgusting to me, but I think the average person may be apprehensive to eating a heart.

There's an Italian recipe for it:

Cuore di Bue sulla Brace (http://www.cliffordawright.com/caw/recipes/display/bycategory.php/recipe_id/627/id/37/)

Angela
18-09-17, 19:50
People couldn't afford to be squeamish about food until very recently; every single edible bit would get eaten. That includes countries like England.
"Dressed tripe was a popular nutritious and cheap dish for the British working classes from Victorian times until the latter half of the 20th century.[5] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tripe#cite_note-5)[6] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tripe#cite_note-6)[7] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tripe#cite_note-7) While it is still popular in many parts of the world today, the number of tripe eaters, and consequently the number of tripe dressers, in the UK has rapidly declined."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tripe

That isn't the case in France, or Italy, or Spain, for that matter, or perhaps also the Balkans, where it is still eaten. In fact, in Italy I think there's a trend to go back to "cucina povera" or poor people's food because it is seen as both more authentic and less processed, and as part of our heritage, which some of us are loathe to give up.

There are still a lot of stands in Firenze which sell trippa alla fiorentina and lampredotto.

https://cuthemap.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/wpid-20141211_155103.jpg
If prepared well there's very little that can't be made edible in my experience. I exclude maggoty cheese!

In my experience the French are very enthusiastic eaters of "organ meats", more so than Italians. A friend of mine is married to an Irish-American guy who is very unadventurous when it comes to food, food phobic, actually, when it comes to certain types of food. They cut short their visit to France and went across into Italy partly because the menus were so heavy in those kinds of dishes, and things like snails, frogs legs etc. The man was pining for some simple pasta. :) I was his friend originally, study buddies, but this is something I really couldn't stand about him. I could never have lived with him.

Rognon de veau-Calf kidneys
https://i.pinimg.com/736x/dc/63/42/dc634238f7fbee47f79bdf402a6020d0--plats-mijot%C3%A9s-les-plats.jpg

Jovialis
19-09-17, 01:45
That girl I dated that disliked Italian food thought pasta with clams, shrimp or mussels was odd. I was blown away...

She disliked all seafood as well. Once I cooked lobster for the both of us, and she refused to eat it when she saw it's underside. I'm a huge lover of seafood myself.

Ironically, lobster was considered poor people's food, and was commonly served to prisoners originally.


In North America, the American lobster did not achieve popularity until the mid-19th century, when New Yorkers and Bostonians developed a taste for it, and commercial lobster fisheries only flourished after the development of the lobster smack (https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lobster_smack&action=edit&redlink=1),[28] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobster#cite_note-28) a custom-made boat with open holding wells on the deck to keep the lobsters alive during transport.[29] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobster#cite_note-29) Prior to this time, lobster was considered a mark of poverty or as a food for indentured servants or lower members of society in Maine (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maine), Massachusetts (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts), and the Canadian Maritimes (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maritimes). It has been suggested servants specified in employment agreements that they would not eat lobster more than twice per week, however there is no evidence for this.[30] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobster#cite_note-30)[31] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobster#cite_note-31) Lobster was also commonly served in prisons, much to the displeasure of inmates.[32] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobster#cite_note-32) American lobster was initially deemed worthy only of being used as fertilizer (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fertilizer) or fish bait, and until well into the 20th century, it was not viewed as more than a low-priced canned staple food.[33] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobster#cite_note-Fish_Forever-33)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobster


My father sometimes prepares it on the barbecue or bakes it in the oven, like this.:

https://i.imgur.com/EBO6Ygt.jpg

I really like it, but I prefer to have it with linguine and the lobster cooked in red sauce. But I know this is not an authentic Italian dish, considering it's the north american lobster. Nevertheless, it comes out amazing imo.

As for authentic Italian food, I need to start learning from my mother and father more about how to prepare it, so I can keep up the tradition. I have to admit it, but my father is the superior cook. But that's something I must never tell my mother, or she will disown me. I guess people from my dad's town are a little more nuanced in how they prepare food. They are also famous for their bread; Pane di Altamura (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pane_di_Altamura).

Angela
19-09-17, 04:25
I guess she wouldn't have gone for our seafood dishes, then. They can look pretty scary. :)


http://www.buonissimo.org/archive/borg/Fxu5tJ496yM%252FpyJbobuSpaLp8tLuLfJqrKvq5NTXVKw8nl EKDGHvUA%253D%253D

http://www.oggi.it/cucina/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2014/07/SaporiMare_115g.jpg

A real French bouillabaisse would probably scare some people witless. :)
http://blog.giallozafferano.it/lacucinadisusana/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/bouillabaise.jpg

I adore lobster, all seafood, really, but my favorite in America is crab.

Not only Italians know how to cook, even if I think we and the French are better at it.:)

There's nothing much better than a great Maryland crab cake, or a real New England style clam bake. In fact, when my family comes from Italy, that's the kind of food I tend to serve them: barbecued ribs and steak, lobster, crab, clams and mussels etc.

Sometimes I serve them New England style clam chowder in a hollowed out small loaf of sourdough bead. Once, as a treat when some great clams had come in I made them both Clams Casino and Clams Oreganata as a starter. They loved it.
http://foodnetwork.sndimg.com/content/dam/images/food/fullset/2004/4/13/0/tm1e19_clams_casino_royal.jpg.rend.sniipadlarge.jp eg

http://cf.restaurantimages.menuism.com/cDv-l82bCr37dqeJe7eb4F-giardino-restaurant-640x480.jpg

Given how much seafood is eaten on the New England and New York/New Jersey coasts, and all the way down to Florida it's remarkable to me that there are some people in these areas who won't eat it or any fish, really. How could someone not like Snow Crab? Maybe it's because they were never exposed to these foods in childhood. I fed my kids absolutely everything I liked to eat, and there isn't much I don't like...brussels sprouts maybe, and lima beans. :) I also don't much like raw protein. They only thing they got squeamish about was when the lobster got tossed into the water if I was steaming it, and they never really developed a taste for trippa.


@Twilight,

I just saw your post above. I've very rarely seen raw shellfish on restaurant menus, but my father used to go to the shore and buy dateri, a mollusk which is now just about extinct in our area, fresh from the fishermen, open it with a knife, squeeze some lemon juice on it, and just eat it. I have seen a lot of ceviche style fish, however. You know, very thinly sliced pieces marinated in lemon juice or vinegar and spices.

My dad liked our version of a steak tartar too. I'll eat raw protein, but I prefer these kinds of things cooked. Same with raw eggs. My nonno used to suck out two fresh eggs every morning, followed by a shot of grappa. That'll put hair on your chest, I guess. :)

davef
19-09-17, 06:10
I'm super adventurous!!! Cow's heart? Kidneys? I'll eat eyeballs if they're on the menu!! I'm a total ghoul!

I used to watch Bear Grylls religiously (warning...not for the squeamish) and my appetite would skyrocket after seeing him stick his hand in a tree and pull out a handful of squirmies and other multi legged things.

And yes I've had snails, cat brains (they're kinda like really thick and slightly rubbery pieces of scrambled eggs, and they taste eggy as well), and frog legs and they were DELISH!!

davef
19-09-17, 07:57
This covered in melted maggot cheese! I'm opening my own restaurant...Ristorante di Davef!
Angela will be one of my top customers!
https://c1.staticflickr.com/8/7152/6720032299_e5fdea29d5_b.jpg

davef
19-09-17, 08:01
But one food item that I would stay away from is tuna from a can...it grosses me out badly

Jovialis
20-09-17, 16:52
It's really a southern thing: Maryland, North and South Carolina, New Orleans. I normally wouldn't order them in New York. They should be cooked within a few hours of their dying, because they spoil very quickly and the delicate, sweet flavor disappears. I normally order them in Florida or if I happen to be in the Washington DC area. It's a spring through September season.

The fishermen usually catch them when they're still hard shelled, put them in a salt water tank until they molt the hard shell and then quickly remove them before their shell can harden again.

It's not so bad, really; they do remove the gills and the abdomen, I think.

They also serve them deep fried in a sandwich with french fries. I guess I never thought about it, but it does look a little barbaric, yes? :) They call it a Po-Boy.


http://thirstyreader.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/softshellpoboy2.jpg

I've had the pleasure of eating this too, when I went to Maryland near the Chesapeake Bay. It was really tasty, and I had it in a sandwich as well.

One of my favorite things to do is to go crabbing on the pier late at night with my friends when I would visit South Jersey. The best bait to use is squid.

I've seen people go crabbing and fishing on piers in the Hudson River. I hope they're only doing it for sport. However, I've seen people actually swim and kayak in there too. :shocked: Reminds me of this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hK3pBcY3k0).

Angela
20-09-17, 18:45
I've had the pleasure of eating this too, when I went to Maryland near the Chesapeake Bay. It was really tasty, and I had it in a sandwich as well.

One of my favorite things to do is to go crabbing on the pier late at night with my friends when I would visit South Jersey. The best bait to use is squid.

I've seen people go crabbing and fishing on piers in the Hudson River. I hope they're only doing it for sport. However, I've seen people actually swim and kayak in there too. :shocked: Reminds me of this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hK3pBcY3k0).

Too funny. :)

I'd never swim or fish in the lower Hudson, but actually the upper reaches of the Hudson have been really cleaned up. They used the millions from GE and companies like it to do it. Old fears die hard, though. I'd kayak on it, but I'd be leery of eating fish caught in it.

I think Europeans have a skewed view of American food. It's not all about fast food places, although Americans do eat way too much of that kind of food. There's also very good regional food, like in the south. The coastal southeast has great food, even if some of it's very fattening.

Keeping just to foods which some people are squeamish about...

Shrimp and grits:Amazing how good grits can taste when they're made with tons of cream and butter. :)
https://newinnolablog.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/7185094067_a23b65e001_o1-e1378927806455.jpg?w=672


Seafood stew:
https://img1.10bestmedia.com/Images/Photos/292014/p-Poogans-2_54_990x660.jpg

Twilight
21-09-17, 06:44
I guess she wouldn't have gone for our seafood dishes, then. They can look pretty scary. :)


http://www.buonissimo.org/archive/borg/Fxu5tJ496yM%252FpyJbobuSpaLp8tLuLfJqrKvq5NTXVKw8nl EKDGHvUA%253D%253D

http://www.oggi.it/cucina/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2014/07/SaporiMare_115g.jpg

A real French bouillabaisse would probably scare some people witless. :)
http://blog.giallozafferano.it/lacucinadisusana/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/bouillabaise.jpg

I adore lobster, all seafood, really, but my favorite in America is crab.

Not only Italians know how to cook, even if I think we and the French are better at it.:)

There's nothing much better than a great Maryland crab cake, or a real New England style clam bake. In fact, when my family comes from Italy, that's the kind of food I tend to serve them: barbecued ribs and steak, lobster, crab, clams and mussels etc.

Sometimes I serve them New England style clam chowder in a hollowed out small loaf of sourdough bead. Once, as a treat when some great clams had come in I made them both Clams Casino and Clams Oreganata as a starter. They loved it.
http://foodnetwork.sndimg.com/content/dam/images/food/fullset/2004/4/13/0/tm1e19_clams_casino_royal.jpg.rend.sniipadlarge.jp eg

http://cf.restaurantimages.menuism.com/cDv-l82bCr37dqeJe7eb4F-giardino-restaurant-640x480.jpg

Given how much seafood is eaten on the New England and New York/New Jersey coasts, and all the way down to Florida it's remarkable to me that there are some people in these areas who won't eat it or any fish, really. How could someone not like Snow Crab? Maybe it's because they were never exposed to these foods in childhood. I fed my kids absolutely everything I liked to eat, and there isn't much I don't like...brussels sprouts maybe, and lima beans. :) I also don't much like raw protein. They only thing they got squeamish about was when the lobster got tossed into the water if I was steaming it, and they never really developed a taste for trippa.


@Twilight,

I just saw your post above. I've very rarely seen raw shellfish on restaurant menus, but my father used to go to the shore and buy dateri, a mollusk which is now just about extinct in our area, fresh from the fishermen, open it with a knife, squeeze some lemon juice on it, and just eat it. I have seen a lot of ceviche style fish, however. You know, very thinly sliced pieces marinated in lemon juice or vinegar and spices.

My dad liked our version of a steak tartar too. I'll eat raw protein, but I prefer these kinds of things cooked. Same with raw eggs. My nonno used to suck out two fresh eggs every morning, followed by a shot of grappa. That'll put hair on your chest, I guess. :)

I'm not sure, I'll see if I can ask my dad about raw clams. It might depend on the specific locations. You got to be careful with eating clams in America One thing to be careful is to watch out Red tide. Sometimes on beaches there are signs that say no eating clams because of toxins. Perhaps there is a location where pollutants are not in the water.

davef
21-09-17, 07:39
I'm not sure, I'll see if I can ask my dad about raw clams. It might depend on the specific locations. You got to be careful with eating clams in America One thing to be careful is to watch out Red tide. Sometimes on beaches there are signs that say no eating clams because of toxins. Perhaps there is a location where pollutants are not in the water.
Clams drenched in horse radish! Delish! I can eat those creatures all day, I swear

davef
21-09-17, 07:51
What I like about lobster is that you're given the entire carcass to feast on. It's been found that men like to cook meat simply due to being exposed to a piece of a dead animal and having control over it. It must be an archaic hunter and gatherer trait. I think this explains why I've always enjoyed lobster or wanted to eat a succulent pig or other farm/big game animal with most of its structures intact. It instills a very satisfying sense of dominance in me (nite: this only applies to farm or game animals commonly hunted like deer).

SimonTiger
30-06-18, 21:25
When I was in Berlin, I tried Turkish cuisine. I liked it very much.

Strudel
24-10-18, 10:37
Interesting how articles like this divvy up dishes into countries, when really many of these are eaten in various incarnations in many countries of Europe. Take liver pate for example. It is listed under Denmark, yet is eaten by French, Germans and other Europeans. It is delicious. Perhaps gross if you think about it too hard by North American standards, but then my dad ate schmaltz which is basically congealed goose fat on a slice of rye bread with some salt and paprika sprinkled on it and as a kid I loved it. My own kids would puke at it but hey...times change.

Angela
24-10-18, 16:14
Interesting how articles like this divvy up dishes into countries, when really many of these are eaten in various incarnations in many countries of Europe. Take liver pate for example. It is listed under Denmark, yet is eaten by French, Germans and other Europeans. It is delicious. Perhaps gross if you think about it too hard by North American standards, but then my dad ate schmaltz which is basically congealed goose fat on a slice of rye bread with some salt and paprika sprinkled on it and as a kid I loved it. My own kids would puke at it but hey...times change.

We eat it too.

Basically, people used to eat every part of the animal. You couldn't be squeamish.

Countries differ in how much of their old "poor food" traditions they maintain. Americans have retained very few if any of them. The Italians and the French have retained a lot of them, just for two examples. That's why there are so many organ meats on French menus, and why they still have stands selling tripe on the streets of Florence.

CottonMoney
26-10-18, 19:42
In Romania(

Strudel
26-10-18, 22:21
We eat it too.

Basically, people used to eat every part of the animal. You couldn't be squeamish.



Yes, that is so true. I have had blood pudding and head cheese and a number of other old world foods. I can't say I'm much of a fan of them but they also don't disgust me. I do enjoy the taste of some smelly cheeses as well. I must have gotten this from my dad who adored his Limburger to the disgust of the whole family's noses in the house. I have never had casu marzu. This would be too much for me as I have a strong natural reaction against spoiled/rot odour and infestation.

Some of this might be not just culturally established by what one is used to, but also individually determined. For instance, I have a very defined and strong sense of smell - known as "The nose" by my family and close friends because I only have to give any food one whiff and can tell you if it is spoiled. I would love to learn if there's is any genetic component to this ability.

Also, the dishes with the full head of the animal, I have to admit make me pretty squeamish. This is more I would guess due to non-exposure. I even have trouble with fish looking up at me, which I only recently learned is best to get the fish this way as it ensures more freshness? Even a whole pig on a spit gives me uncomfortable and that I have been exposed to, so I just must be a bit too removed from my earthy roots. It's maybe not the best to get so detached from the reality of meat eating, which is another topic altogether.




Countries differ in how much of their old "poor food" traditions they maintain. Americans have retained very few if any of them. The Italians and the French have retained a lot of them, just for two examples. That's why there are so many organ meats on French menus, and why they still have stands selling tripe on the streets of Florence.

Yes, I see this with Italian and French. Also, I think Germans and other Europeans too have kept some of their traditional foods when they have emigrated. My mother owned a European delicatessen and I also grew up knowing Dutch, Poles, Croats and Greek as well as of course Italian who still maintained their traditional cooking at home to varying degrees. It does get diluted and change with the generations, though. Perhaps those with stronger family ties hold onto the ethnic cuisine longer. It is interesting.

Angela
27-10-18, 00:20
Yes, that is so true. I have had blood pudding and head cheese and a number of other old world foods. I can't say I'm much of a fan of them but they also don't disgust me. I do enjoy the taste of some smelly cheeses as well. I must have gotten this from my dad who adored his Limburger to the disgust of the whole family's noses in the house. I have never had casu marzu. This would be too much for me as I have a strong natural reaction against spoiled/rot odour and infestation.

Some of this might be not just culturally established by what one is used to, but also individually determined. For instance, I have a very defined and strong sense of smell - known as "The nose" by my family and close friends because I only have to give any food one whiff and can tell you if it is spoiled. I would love to learn if there's is any genetic component to this ability.

Also, the dishes with the full head of the animal, I have to admit make me pretty squeamish. This is more I would guess due to non-exposure. I even have trouble with fish looking up at me, which I only recently learned is best to get the fish this way as it ensures more freshness? Even a whole pig on a spit gives me uncomfortable and that I have been exposed to, so I just must be a bit too removed from my earthy roots. It's maybe not the best to get so detached from the reality of meat eating, which is another topic altogether.



Yes, I see this with Italian and French. Also, I think Germans and other Europeans too have kept some of their traditional foods when they have emigrated. My mother owned a European delicatessen and I also grew up knowing Dutch, Poles, Croats and Greek as well as of course Italian who still maintained their traditional cooking at home to varying degrees. It does get diluted and change with the generations, though. Perhaps those with stronger family ties hold onto the ethnic cuisine longer. It is interesting.

I think you're right. It's exposure culturally, but also individual differences.

My Dad would pick up Casu Marzu (Sardinian cheese) in La Spezia after work, but my mother would make him eat it outside. :) The very sight and smell of it made her gag. Me too, for that matter. On the other hand, she liked tripa and made it occasionally. The way she made it resulted in a quite tasty dish and you wouldn't have known it was tripe. I tried to give it to my children and they ran out of the room. :)It does smell really bad when it's cooking. My husband likes chicken liver, and I make them for him occasionally with white wine etc., but I can't eat it. I don't know why exactly. It may be the texture. That's certainly why I won't eat calves liver.
https://www.thebossykitchen.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Chicken-Livers-With-Caramelized-Onions-And-Wine6.jpg?x21659


As for whole pigs spit roasted, that's something very, very common in Italy, and I don't get squeamish at all.

The same goes for fish. I don't think I've ever been in an Italian restaurant in Italy where the head doesn't come on the plate. It's by looking at the eyes that you can tell if it's fresh or not. I have a very dear friend from Croatia. We often go out as couples and eat at Croatian/Italian restaurants in Manhattan or Astoria. These are the only places where she'll eat fish, because it always comes out with the head. It doesn't bother me at all. However, I never join her in scooping out the brains and popping the eye balls into my mouth. That's a step too far for me. :)

davef
27-10-18, 01:46
We all have our tastes. I love liver; in fact chopped liver on toast, mustard and onions is something i enjoy a lot. At work, the IT team orders pizza (yes, we developers love our pizza) and I tried bacon and pineapple pizza for the first time and i won't hesitate to admit it was one of the best pizzas I've ever had

bicicleur
27-10-18, 12:32
I like liver too, but I never get it as nobody else likes it here.
But when we eat out, and it is on the menu, 2 times out of 3 I'll pick that.

Same for the pizza, I'm the only one who needs anchovis on it.

ToBeOrNotToBe
27-10-18, 17:57
I like liver too, but I never get it as nobody else likes it here.
But when we eat out, and it is on the menu, 2 times out of 3 I'll pick that.

Same for the pizza, I'm the only one who needs anchovis on it.

Anchovies on pizza is a crime

Angela
27-10-18, 18:48
I like liver too, but I never get it as nobody else likes it here.
But when we eat out, and it is on the menu, 2 times out of 3 I'll pick that.

Same for the pizza, I'm the only one who needs anchovis on it.

You have to learn to make it for yourself. :) They're easy and quick recipes.

I'm not squeamish about liver at all. It's the smell of the chicken liver I don't like. As for the calves' liver, it's that grainy texture.

Anchovy is a "secret ingredient" in a lot of my recipes, but I don't like the "hairy" texture of the tiny ones from a can that people put on things like pizza or what Americans call "Caesar" salad. They're also too pungent for me or "fishy" tasting because of the way they're processed.

http://www.slate.com/content/dam/slate/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2012/03/120315_EX_anchovyPizza.jpg.CROP.cq5dam_web_1280_12 80_jpeg.jpg

Fresh anchovies taste very different: fresh and mild. Whenever I go back to my area in Italy I eat them as much as possible since I can't get them here. They're delicious. If we didn't eat anchovies and sardines, and various other small, ugly, fish, we wouldn't eat much fish at all, because the Ligurian sea is famously pretty empty of big fish like the kinds you get in other places in Italy.

http://gqtrippin.com/wp-content/gallery/italy/anchovies.jpg

Sardines are different. I can get the fresh ones here and I love them. I even like the jarred variety. My favorite way of eating them, though, is grilled over a wood fire. In the summer we go to Greek restaurants in Astoria to eat them. They are so yummy. The Portuguese have a nice way with them too. Most of the Italian restaurants have more "assimilated" restaurants.
http://s3.amazonaws.com/foodspotting-ec2/reviews/4892891/thumb_600.jpg?1406692903

I don't know when Anglo countries decided that eating rabbit was "gross", but it's stupid. It's the most delicious, sweet, low fat meat.
On the rare occasions I'm in a Portuguese market and see it, I grab it. Otherwise, I have to eat it at Portuguese restaurants, although I prefer it "our" way. Considering how over-run Australia is with rabbits because they weren't part of the original ecosystem and they have no predators, they should start a campaign where they're hunted and sold and people should eat it a couple of times a week.

http://www.lastampa.it/rw/Pub/p3/2014/08/28/Speciali/Foto/RitagliWeb/I3JEPV227140-kaeD-U10302612381171ECE-640x320%40LaStampa.it.jpg

davef
28-10-18, 08:40
I think it has to do with rabbits being "too cute and adorable" to eat, according to whoever decided that they shouldn't be eaten. I personally don't care, I never had rabbit but I would be happy to give it a try. I had cat brains at a French restaurant and I loved every ounce of them! They were juicy and they felt like really thick pieces of scrambled egg. They even tasted a bit like eggs, but mostly like any piece of beef

elenekaterrr
07-02-19, 11:30
I appreciate all people who are discussing these recipes because these recipes are very cool because these recipes are connected to Europian cuisine

Carlos
07-02-19, 15:13
The blood in tomato is a typical dish of the province and one of the oldest tapas that were served in the bars of Cádiz. It is a typical recipe for the slaughter of pigs and the use of all their products. It is also usually made with chicken blood or turkey.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-mAGGT_z2Bes/UZSGSQ64Z1I/AAAAAAAAA1c/Fq753Uxx-sg/s400/P1000404.JPG

I love