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View Full Version : 1st Post, I am a new R-BY3320 under L-48 and U-106



Michael Helmantoler
28-12-15, 01:55
I want to grow up to be a BioGeographer. I share a common surname with Dr. Hellenthal of Oxford Universities "People of the British Isles" project.

FTDNA just sent my results of the new L-48 Snip panel. I currently fall under Z381>Z301>L48>"636=11"> S23189> A6706> BY3320. There are currently three individuals in this clade, and this clade does not currently have any subclades. Only one of these individuals have taken a NGS type test (kit 299166). My AncestryDNA AT DNA is up loaded to FamilyFinder and tells me I am 53% Irish and only 2% western European. With a surname Helmantel from the Netherlands and Hellenthal from the Frankfurt/ Bavarian part of Germany going back to 1600, I am assuming that I am a Frank tribe member. On my MT DNA I actually have a maternal surname "Frankish".

Can anyone explain what the "636=11" means in my new clade results?
Thanks is advance, Michael

RobertColumbia
01-01-16, 16:57
Welcome! As you might know, U106 is generally considered a "Germanic" haplogroup, which indicates a likelihood that your paternal ancestors came from one of the Germanic tribes. While it is quite possible that you are a Frank, you could also have descended from medieval Anglo-Saxon or Viking traders who settled down in Frankfurt and became assimilated.

My own y-clade is part of the L21 "Atlantic Celtic" branch, another branch of the large R1b family.

I believe the "636=11" is an STR result, namely that your DYS636 has 11 repeats. Can anyone confirm?

There is a lot to learn! Keep learning!

Michael Helmantoler
01-03-16, 20:14
Welcome! As you might know, U106 is generally considered a "Germanic" haplogroup, which indicates a likelihood that your paternal ancestors came from one of the Germanic tribes. While it is quite possible that you are a Frank, you could also have descended from medieval Anglo-Saxon or Viking traders who settled down in Frankfurt and became assimilated.

My own y-clade is part of the L21 "Atlantic Celtic" branch, another branch of the large R1b family.

I believe the "636=11" is an STR result, namely that your DYS636 has 11 repeats. Can anyone confirm?

There is a lot to learn! Keep learning!
Thank you for your estimate of my linage. I agree on the Germanic but my AncestryDNA autosomal DNA results does not list any Germanic and states that I am 52% Irish with 1% Western European. :useless:

RobertColumbia
17-03-16, 20:53
Thank you for your estimate of my linage. I agree on the Germanic but my AncestryDNA autosomal DNA results does not list any Germanic and states that I am 52% Irish with 1% Western European. :useless:

You're welcome!

aDNA (admixture) results work best in concert with traditional genealogy. What do you know of your non-paternal ancestors' origins? Keep in mind that many populations are similar and that admixture calculations are steeped in empirical observations. In other words, they are "all other things being equal" results. Of course, the other things are hardly, if ever, equal. For example, Scottish Highlanders may be closer to Irish populations than other Scottish people are, so an "Irish" admixture result combined with genealogical documentation that simply says "Scotland" origins may point to Highlanders as a likely source. A Scandinavian autosomal result plus documentation saying "Scotland" could indicate ancestry from the Orkney or Shetland islands, areas of Scotland with strong Scandinavian (as opposed to Celtic) influences.

Of course, your y-DNA result may (or may not) match the rest of your ancestry.

The 1% "Western European" ancestry refers to DNA markers that do not seem to be specific to any more specific population. In other words, they are more spread out.

Michael Helmantoler
23-08-16, 03:25
The majority of my non-paternal ancestor origins are Scot-Irish. My maternal ancestors origins are from Yorkshire England and Artroix in northern France. The paternal surname line stays in the Rhineland Palatinate and Northern Netherlands back to the 1600s.


You're welcome!

aDNA (admixture) results work best in concert with traditional genealogy. What do you know of your non-paternal ancestors' origins? Keep in mind that many populations are similar and that admixture calculations are steeped in empirical observations. In other words, they are "all other things being equal" results. Of course, the other things are hardly, if ever, equal. For example, Scottish Highlanders may be closer to Irish populations than other Scottish people are, so an "Irish" admixture result combined with genealogical documentation that simply says "Scotland" origins may point to Highlanders as a likely source. A Scandinavian autosomal result plus documentation saying "Scotland" could indicate ancestry from the Orkney or Shetland islands, areas of Scotland with strong Scandinavian (as opposed to Celtic) influences.

Of course, your y-DNA result may (or may not) match the rest of your ancestry.

The 1% "Western European" ancestry refers to DNA markers that do not seem to be specific to any more specific population. In other words, they are more spread out.