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Fire Haired14
20-02-16, 22:46
Sardinian mtDNA (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1JgzsBU1EwzxBvZRsbtfeeZE45GmhA2lchqR_F81EwKg/edit#gid=0)

Along with several thousand mito-genomes I've collected from Ian Logan are 90 Sardinian mito-genomes. I think it's important to know Sardinian mtDNA is very differnt from Neolithic Central Europeans and Anatolian, and the implications this has on European mtDNA in general.

Implications for all of Europe

Sardinian mtDNA is dominated by H1 and H3, with nearly 50% of Sardinians having either one. If you don't count non-H1/H3 mega-lineages about 60% of Sardinians have H1/H3. Sardinians have very little K, T2b, and N1a1a, which combine took up over 50% of Early Neolithic Central European/Anatolian mtDNA.

The high amount of H1/H3 in Sardinia and overall difference in haplogroup frequencies to EEF has implications to the rest of Europe, because it leaves room for difference in haplogroup frequency between modern/Neolithic Europeans and there still being a big chunk of EEF in all of Europe. The best way at determining whether an ancient population's mtDNA is ancestral to moderns, is subclades of haplogroups not haplogroup frequency. In this regard modern and Neolithic Europeans share a lot to the expense of all other humans.

My opinon is that H1 and H3 derive from EEF, and ultimately Neolithic Anatolia. Of the EEFs tested for H1/H3 a pretty high frequency do have H1/H3. From Neolithic France all samples were tested, and 17% had H1 and 9% had H3. Most H samples recently coming from Neolithic North Spain have been H3 with a few being H1. Swedish Funnel Beaker individual Gok2 had H1c, a H1 clade typical of my Danish and NorthWest European(American, British) samples.

Lack of Steppe mtDNA, some Middle Eastern mtDNA

All of the non-H1/H3 Sardinian mtDNA falls under typical Neolithic and modern European; J1c, T2b, J2a1a1, J2b1a, U5b, and HV0, except for a few exceptions. There's two U1a1c3s with Sardinian-specfic mutations and a U6d1a. The U1a1c3 is probably from West Asia and U6d1a from NorthWest Africa.

There is no typical Steppe mtDNA as far as I can see in Sardinia. They lack U5a, U4, T1a1, J1b1a1, H6a1a, H2a1, W6, and I. The only T1a sample from Sardinia is T1a*, while all Steppe and 90% of modern European T1a is T1a1.

Very Different H1/H3 from other Europeans

Sardinians share a high frequency of H1 with other Europeans and H3 with West Europeans, but the similarity ends there. The majority of Sardinian H1/H3 is H1*/H3*. They belong to undiscovered subclades. I've already had a detailed look at Danish and Basque H1/H3, and both mostly fall under discovered subclades. Furthermore Basque and Danish H1/H3 are mostly apart of differnt basal subclades. So, there's lots of diversity of H1/H3 in Europe, suggesting an old origin.

Promenade
23-02-16, 12:02
Do you have any information concerning mtDNA H1e? I have found sparse information regarding it and I was hoping that someone here could lead me down a path where I could learn more about by maternal haplogroup.

Regarding what you wrote here, from the little I heard about Haplogroup H, it was widespread in early europe and possibly related to the Gravettian culture, explaining its high prevalence in northern africa and western europe, but I know very little concerning this.

Fire Haired14
23-02-16, 13:30
Do you have any information concerning mtDNA H1e? I have found sparse information regarding it and I was hoping that someone here could lead me down a path where I could learn more about by maternal haplogroup.

No because H1e needs full-sequence testing to be identified. But I've been getting lots of fully sequenced mtDNA laterly, so I will soon. I know there are several examples of H1e from Neolithic Europe, and it exists basically everywhere today.


Regarding what you wrote here, from the little I heard about Haplogroup H, it was widespread in early europe and possibly related to the Gravettian culture, explaining its high prevalence in northern africa and western europe, but I know very little concerning this.

All mtDNA from pre-Neolithic so far is under haplogroup U, except for a few examples of rare R, N, M, and one H lineages. In my opinion most H arrived from Anatolia in the Neolithic, like 8,000 years ago.